• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

bottle baby

KNERSIE

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 16, 2006
Messages
7,058
Reaction score
0
Location
3rd World
The difference between a bottle calf that is raised to the best of my ability on the right compared to a calf about a week younger raised on a good cow without any supplement on sourveld. The calf on the left and his dam has been pulled in on Monday to be AI-d, they weren't on planted pasture before this week.

 

angie1

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2006
Messages
4,179
Reaction score
0
Location
minnesota
S&WSigma40VEShooter":3efy1dgj said:
Bottle feeding really does stunt em. Proof is in the picture puddin.
Nah, too many variables regardless. All that it proves is that KNERSIE would be on the cull list for raising a calf that turns out less than his counterparts. :lol2: It takes more time than most people have. If you pay yourself for your time, it takes more time that what it is worth. It is easy to underestimate the cows job until you have to do it. Still think 0904 will taste good though. :nod:
 

hillsdown

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2006
Messages
9,925
Reaction score
0
Location
Alberta, Canada
I have to agree with Angie. Bottle feeding is an effort and time consuming. You can't just give them a bottle twice a day and leave them on pasture and expect them to gain the same as their contemporaries. (not that this is what you did, I am replying to S&W post) I think the only way you could even get close to being as good as mom with just milk and grass is if you had a free range milk bar set up and the calf could come drink as much as it wanted anytime it wanted and use real milk that is high in protein and fat.

Knersie how do you know that maybe the calf just isn't as good genetically as the one raised by mom, maybe that is all you could get out of that calf even if it was raised by mom.

Still a nice calf and will taste really good too.
 

Workinonit Farm

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2004
Messages
7,151
Reaction score
0
Location
Ctrl Virginia
hillsdown":1bqw1zaa said:
Knersie how do you know that maybe the calf just isn't as good genetically as the one raised by mom, maybe that is all you could get out of that calf even if it was raised by mom.

I was thinking along similar lines. I have a cow out in the pastures now, #528, that was bottle raised (she's had 3 calves so far). Going with the theory that had she been raised by her momma, and looking at the pics of those two Herf calves, then had #528 been raised by her momma, she'd have grown to be one heck of a monster-sized cow.

Not all bottle babies are the same. I have had a few that did not do as well as their contemporaries.

Katherine
 

aussie_cowgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
1,228
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Australia
That's right, some calves, no matter how well you feed them, don't take to bottle feeding. But then I was at the state show last week and the junior champion red angus bull who had an eye muscle of 123cm2 was actually a bottle calf. He was smaller than the other BUT he was also more filled out than the other one from the same stud. If you saw him, you would not have picked he was a bottle calf.
 

Australian

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
1,189
Reaction score
0
Location
Northern New England Region, Tenterfield NSW Austr
Once upon a time in our herd and others you could tell a bottle or bucket fed calf from the rest but now we can't tell the difference. Often they were pot bellied and did stand out. We start them off on half strength bought milk ( not powder) to this we add 2 or 3 hens eggs, some sugar is added for the first couple of days then we stop that. Feed them five times a day for the first two weeks them get them back to 3 times a day till about a month to 6 weeks then onto twice daily. We give them custom mix ( a grain mix with corn,sorghum,barley etc) just a little taste to start off with. They never ever get grain before they have their milk. They have lucerne hay to nibble on as well. We feed them til they are about 9 months old. We have a bucket reared South Devon steer that is 2 years old now and weighs 800kgs he is the same weight as some of our SD bulls in the same paddock.
 

cfpinz

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 8, 2005
Messages
5,865
Reaction score
2
Location
Virginia
The cow in the picture (with her first calf at side) lost her mom when she was a couple weeks old. We didn't have a good place to keep her at the time so my wife's parents raised her for us. I'd say they did a pretty good job.

 

regolith

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2009
Messages
2,794
Reaction score
0
Location
New Zealand
That's fairly typical of the difference I've seen the few times I let a cow rear calves. They tend to be leaner and framier.

Although it's convenient, I'm no real fan of putting babies in a shed either. They feel 'soft' compared to the ones left outside.
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2009
Messages
805
Reaction score
0
Location
East TN
angie":1xgqqq2d said:
S&WSigma40VEShooter":1xgqqq2d said:
Bottle feeding really does stunt em. Proof is in the picture puddin.
Nah, too many variables regardless. All that it proves is that KNERSIE would be on the cull list for raising a calf that turns out less than his counterparts. :lol2: It takes more time than most people have. If you pay yourself for your time, it takes more time that what it is worth. It is easy to underestimate the cows job until you have to do it. Still think 0904 will taste good though. :nod:


Oh no doubt he will taste good.
 
Top