• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Blood in stool of new born bottle fed calf

Bar E

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2016
Messages
66
Reaction score
0
Location
Saskatchewan, Canada
Seen Lil baby had a poo this morning, had a hint of blood in it, poop looked brown with a tinge of yellow. It has had 3 helpings of milk replacer already. (Two yesterday and one this morning.) 20-20-20 formula. No soy in it. Is this normal or am I being a worry wort?
-E
 

farmerjan

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 1, 2016
Messages
3,065
Reaction score
15
Location
Shenandoah ValleyVirginia
It is not unheard of but watch closely as it often can mean coccidiosis. Usually shows up after 10days - 2 weeks or so but have had new babies have it too. I wouldn't do anything drastic yet just keep a close eye. Did the calf get colostrum? If it gets weak, wobbly or doesn't want to drink then jump right on treatment for coccidiosis, for starters, as they can dehydrate so quick. Coccidiosis is very easy to treat and get rid of.
 

Bar E

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2016
Messages
66
Reaction score
0
Location
Saskatchewan, Canada
farmerjan":afmeg4j6 said:
It is not unheard of but watch closely as it often can mean coccidiosis. Usually shows up after 10days - 2 weeks or so but have had new babies have it too. I wouldn't do anything drastic yet just keep a close eye. Did the calf get colostrum? If it gets weak, wobbly or doesn't want to drink then jump right on treatment for coccidiosis, for starters, as they can dehydrate so quick. Coccidiosis is very easy to treat and get rid of.


I bought her yesterday at an auction sale. Not sure any background info.
 

SIMMGAL

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 7, 2016
Messages
219
Reaction score
0
Location
Home is where the HERD is, VA
Bar E":39vbcyvy said:
farmerjan":39vbcyvy said:
It is not unheard of but watch closely as it often can mean coccidiosis. Usually shows up after 10days - 2 weeks or so but have had new babies have it too. I wouldn't do anything drastic yet just keep a close eye. Did the calf get colostrum? If it gets weak, wobbly or doesn't want to drink then jump right on treatment for coccidiosis, for starters, as they can dehydrate so quick. Coccidiosis is very easy to treat and get rid of.


I bought her yesterday at an auction sale. Not sure any background info.

I've had some shoddy luck with buying young calves from the sale barn. They usually seem to pick something up from there. In a newborn, it's normal. In an older calf, its more troubling. If you're wondering (and especially since you have limited background info on the calf), it doesn't hurt to mix some corid in the milk you're feeding it.
 

TCRanch

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
4,787
Reaction score
39
Location
Winfield, KS
I'm currently supplementing a calf that had a little blood in her stool and she would hunch her back, wasn't as thrifty/developing as well as this cows previous calves. Called the vet thinking it could be coccidiosis and he said she probably wasn't getting enough nutrition. Checked the cows milk & sure enough she has mastitis (cow is doing better after treatment, calf is doing GREAT). Seeing as how you just bought this calf, I'm assuming it had a rough start, possibly little or no colostrum but too late to remedy that. I started my calf on electrolytes then mixed electrolytes with replacer and now just replacer. No more blood, poo is normal.
 

farmerjan

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 1, 2016
Messages
3,065
Reaction score
15
Location
Shenandoah ValleyVirginia
I would agree with both that some electrolytes, and some corid would be a good preventative. Another thing that I usually do with a calf I know little/nothing about is to get some probiotic paste or powder and give it to them to get the bacteria in their gut tract up and working.
Regardless, if I buy a calf at an auction for any reason, I will give it at least one dose of colostrum. You don't know how old it is, and although the experts say the window for absorption of the antibodies is 24 hours, there is proof that the action of the colostrum being thicker also helps to get the gut tract to working better. So, no matter how old the calf MIGHT be, they get a bottle of colostrum when they get here unless they have come off a dairy directly that I know starts their calves off right.
Since you don't know what this calf did/didn't have, I might be inclined to go with a medicated milk replacer, but you will have to have a VFD for that, thru your vet. And I do not feed medicated milk replacer as a rule.
 

Latest posts

Top