Blind Calf

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Anonymous

We have a two week old calf whose mother would not claim him at all. He never got to nurse her. We fed him 3 quarts of powdered colostrum that I got from the vet within the first 48 hours. He drinks really good from the bottle (about 1 1/2 qts. twice a day). When he was four days old, his eyes started tearing and now that has cleared up, but he is blind. The eyes have a funny color opacity in the pupil. My husband gave him a shot of combiotic (that is all we had on hand). Now I am wondering if there is a chance he could see again, what could I try? He is healthy in every other way and has a marvelous appetite.

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Anonymous

Colostrum should be fed in the first 6 to 12 hours, and is useless after 24 hours. The stomach lining changes quickly in the newborn and by 24 hours he can no longer absorb colostrum.

If he just had a gray haze in/over his lens I would expect it to gradually disappear. You say it is opaque and is in the pupil. That doesn't sound like something that is going away. The good news is that a blind calf or cow can get along pretty well. Some can be let out to pasture with the herd, if they show ability to stay with the other animals. Some might need to be kept in a lot where they can memorize their surroundings.

We had a cow that had both eyelids sewn shut to heal a case of pinkeye. She knew when I was coming with feed, and she would listen to it fall to locate it. Her eyes were fine when we took the stitches out and she is a much tamer cow since that experience.



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Anonymous

One of the dairies I work with had a heifer freshen blind. She learned her way through the milking parlor, went to pasture with the main herd, and learned that if you tap her on one side she is supposed to turn the other way. She once went in the opposite side of the parlor from the side she nprmally went in on and was very confused, a couple of taps and she turned and went right out the door. Gentle as a kitten. The farmer gave her someting in both eyes and within two weeks had cleared up and could see perfectly. She is now mean as a snake.

dunmovin farms

> Colostrum should be fed in the
> first 6 to 12 hours, and is
> useless after 24 hours. The
> stomach lining changes quickly in
> the newborn and by 24 hours he can
> no longer absorb colostrum.

> If he just had a gray haze in/over
> his lens I would expect it to
> gradually disappear. You say it is
> opaque and is in the pupil. That
> doesn't sound like something that
> is going away. The good news is
> that a blind calf or cow can get
> along pretty well. Some can be let
> out to pasture with the herd, if
> they show ability to stay with the
> other animals. Some might need to
> be kept in a lot where they can
> memorize their surroundings.

> We had a cow that had both eyelids
> sewn shut to heal a case of
> pinkeye. She knew when I was
> coming with feed, and she would
> listen to it fall to locate it.
> Her eyes were fine when we took
> the stitches out and she is a much
> tamer cow since that experience.
 

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