BIRTH DEFECT IN CALVES

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MICHAEL

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HAD A REGISTERED BRANGUS COW GIVE BIRTH TO A LARGE CALF THIS AM. CALF WALKS ON THE BACK OF HIS R ANKLE. ALL OTHER LEGS APPEAR SOUND. CALF EXHIBITS NO DISTRESS, APPEARS NORMAL AND HEALTHY OTHERWISE. WILL THIS CORRECT ITSELF?
 

tapeworm

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Dont know what you are calling an ankle on a calf...but is it something that could be broken from pulling since you said it was a large calf???...dont know if R ANKLE means right ankle or rear ankle. Many structural defects of feet and legs in calves will correct themselves...such as being knuckled over. But if he is actually walking on the BACK of it sounds to me like it must be a broken bone
 

Muratic

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CT search engine results for "knuckled over"...

milkmaid":1jym8vwv said:
calf32leg.JPG


This is how he stands (it's a front leg) when he gets tired. He can't completely straighten it like a normal calf - see pic below.

calf32leg1.JPG


That's as straight as it gets.

This is a post milkmaid made a while back. (please see poll for obnoxious posters in the coffee shop) This is not a genetic defect. Just a result of not having enough room.
Any how...is this what you are talking about????? Here is the link to the thread too. http://cattletoday.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=9844&highlight=knuckled
 

Dee

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I usually have a couple every year that are knuckled over as in the above pic. Big calf little cow problem usually. Yesterday I had a #76 bull calf with the opposite problem. It's like his ankels bend opposite. He is walking on his whole hoof, and part of his leg. Both front legs are like that. Never seen that before. They are not broke, he walks a little slow, but other wise he's ok. Anyone else seen this?
 

Wren

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It's just simply that his tendons are not tight. I see this is foals regularly. It will fix its self usually. It just has to do with how the calf layed in the uterus. This applies to both knuckling over and walking on his whole hoof and the back of his leg.
 
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MICHAEL

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SORRY ABOUT THE IFY INFO IN FIRST MESSAGE. IT IS THE RIGHT FRONT LEG. ANKLE REFERS TO FIRST JOINT UP THE LEG FROM THE HOOF. IT IS NOT KNUCKELED OVER AS IN PHOTOS THAT WERE POSTED IN REPLY. IT BENDS THE OTHER WAY. IT WALKS WITH NO APPARENT DISCOMFORT. I WOULD NOT THINK IT COULD WALK LIKE IT DOES W/BROKEN LEG. ALSO THERE IS NO SWELLING SOMETHING I WOULD EXPECT TO SEE W/BREAK. DAM WAS A LARGE MATURE COW SHE CALVED W/NO PROBLEMS, I DID NOT PULL THE CALF.
THANKS FOR YOUR REPLYS. I WILL GET BETTER AT SENDING CORRECT INFO.
MICHAEL
 

Wren

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Your calf just probably has weak tendons. They will fix themselves. If they don't you may need to put a brace on him. It could also be a manganese deficiency if your cows are not getting minerals.

For the claves that knuckle over here is what is going on:
Contracted flexor tendons are probably the most prevalent abnormality of the musculoskeletal system of newborn foals and calves. This condition is caused by an autosomal recessive gene. In utero positioning may also affect the degree of disability.

At birth, the pastern and fetlocks of the forelegs and sometimes the carpal joints are flexed to varying degrees due to shortening of the deep and superficial digital flexors and associated muscles. A cleft palate may accompany this condition in some breeds. Slightly affected animals bear weight on the soles of the feet and walk on their toes. More severely affected animals walk on the dorsal surface of the pastern and fetlock joint. If not treated, the dorsal surfaces of these joints become damaged, and suppurative arthritis develops. Rupture of the common digital extensor can occur as a sequela. This condition should be differentiated from arthrogryposis.

Mildly affected animals recover without treatment. In moderate cases, a splint can be applied to force the animal to bear weight on its toes. The pressure from the splint must not compromise the circulation or the foot may undergo ischemic necrosis. Frequent manual extension of the joints, attempting to stretch the ligaments, tendons, and muscles, aids in treating these intermediate cases. Severe cases require tenotomy of one or both flexor tendons. A plaster-of-Paris cast may also be indicated in some cases. Extreme cases may not respond to any treatment.
 

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