• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Bad girls (cows)

Help Support CattleToday:

Bigfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
12,826
Reaction score
40
Location
Kentucky
You lose track of time, but about a year, or a year and a half ago, I sold a really really mean cow. Literally a few days later, I caught a donkey i had forever trying to kill a calf. He was involved in a serious farm accident, and that problem was solved. I beat my brains out, trying to figure out why he had never done it before. I finally realized, the old bitty was keeping him in check. I had a pretty good selection, of just old mean cows. The kids are taking a much more active roll in actually working the cattle etc. We've had some close calls, and I decided everything that looked at me crossed eyed had to go. I have been slowly selling off the bad ones as I weaned their calves. I'm down now to a pretty docile herd. (not docile by many standards I see here, but docile). I have had coyotes for as long as I can remember, and never had a single problem. I had actually bought in to the "good coyote" mentality after making fun of it here. Well, low and behold all of a sudden this year, I have lost 2 already to coyotes. No doubt in my mind, those old bad girls were probably keeping them beat back.

Those cows were actually pretty good producers for me, and I kinda wish I had them back. I didn't want the kids getting hurt, or making them scared of cattle though. Those 2 calves could have easily been worth $1600-$1800 this fall. All in all, I'd have to say, that I should have rethought selling those bad girls.
 

Ol' 243

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2016
Messages
738
Reaction score
0
Location
Wedowee, Al
I have one sorta nasty one I am keeping just for that reason. My neighbor has a couple of dogs that occasionally wander into my pastures, they aren't bad dogs, but as soon as this ol girl sees 'em she hauls a$$ at them and chases 'em off.
 

Boot Jack Bulls

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 5, 2015
Messages
1,178
Reaction score
39
Location
NW WI
Bigfoot, just remember that any harm to your kid is not worth any cattle. I have a three year old daughter, and she has changed our management in lots of ways. Our stock was pretty docile before, but know, as you said, anything that looks cross eyed at anyone gets the road. I won't tolerate a doe that won't just stand back and let her play with the kids, if she stomps one foot at my child, she is gone! Same goes even for the young bucks. She knows to leave the old guy be, but if the young ones don't behave, they are gone. Even my bulls have learned to back away from the fence when the see her on the other side (her dog is a massive help in training the stock to respect her space). I am willing to put in some extra effort in certain areas so that she can grow up reasonably safe on the farm.
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,030
Reaction score
138
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
We lose hens to yotes if we don't watch closely.. never lost a calf.. I also don't have a dog, so my cows aren't used to dogs running around and perhaps getting the idea that canines are OK.. I have some totally docile cows that get in a real tissy about anything intruding on the pasture... One of them broke through the fence, no doubt chasing something, there's no other way she'd have broken the two BOTTOM wires of the fence unless she had her head down... she's still a 1/4 Saler though and that shows.

Boot jack, Agreed :)
 

cow pollinater

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 22, 2010
Messages
5,749
Reaction score
0
Location
Eastern OK
I think I've told this story before but my neighbor on one of my valley pastures back in CA was big time into rescue dogs. She got a bad bunch that she couldn't handle. I told her shooting them was a last resort but that was the pasture I kept my heifers and registered cows in to AI and the dogs had them pretty stirred up.
I went to the sale and bought a rank old broken mouth salers-ish looking cow with a set of daggers on her head and a three day old calf that tried to kill the ring man and dumped her out with my cattle. About three days later I was looking at cattle and saw a rescued rottweiler with leash still attatched limp around my fenceline to get to the other side where he headed off in his original direction. :lol: She wasn't bad once the calf got a little older but her tolerance for BS was about zero.
 

WalnutCrest

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
2,469
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast KS (USA)
The lesson being there are lots of ways to solve a problem! Just try to make sure you're not making more headaches than you're fixing.
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,030
Reaction score
138
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
cow pollinater":1c79mku4 said:
I think I've told this story before but my neighbor on one of my valley pastures back in CA was big time into rescue dogs. She got a bad bunch that she couldn't handle. I told her shooting them was a last resort but that was the pasture I kept my heifers and registered cows in to AI and the dogs had them pretty stirred up.
I went to the sale and bought a rank old broken mouth salers-ish looking cow with a set of daggers on her head and a three day old calf that tried to kill the ring man and dumped her out with my cattle. About three days later I was looking at cattle and saw a rescued rottweiler with leash still attatched limp around my fenceline to get to the other side where he headed off in his original direction. :lol: She wasn't bad once the calf got a little older but her tolerance for BS was about zero.
I've had a few cows that just HATED dogs but were totally docile otherwise.... I'm OK with that.. those are good temperaments in my books
 

wacocowboy

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2013
Messages
3,201
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Texas
That is why I love a lot of Brahma in my cows. It is just me I don't have any kids so I don't worry about a bad girl. I guess it would be different if I had someone else to worry about getting hurt. In the past took some bad girls from some newbies who couldn't handle them. I will say this bunch of Beefmaster are the gentlest cattle I've ever owned follow me around like a bunch of dogs. They are not so gentle that they will let you pet them or anything but they are gentle enough they get on my nerves sometimes. Some days I miss those old high head F1 Tigers, Brangus and Charbray.
 

ez14.

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2017
Messages
1,400
Reaction score
2
Location
west MI
how old are the kids that are helping you?

there is nothing like a good scare to teach a kid to watch out and pay attention! :nod:
 

Hogtiming

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 20, 2016
Messages
237
Reaction score
0
Coyotes or not. I can say I will not run from or after a cow cow on my place. They make cows everyday. I would be in search of another donkey
 
OP
Bigfoot

Bigfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
12,826
Reaction score
40
Location
Kentucky
ez14.":1kr42kt8 said:
how old are the kids that are helping you?

there is nothing like a good scare to teach a kid to watch out and pay attention! :nod:

12 and 9.
 

Aaron

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 26, 2005
Messages
5,220
Reaction score
1
Location
Stratton, ON, Canada
No mean cows here, ever. Those kind never stick around past 6 months of age. All external disturbances can be dealt with either bullets or poison.
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,030
Reaction score
138
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
Aaron":153xluiq said:
No mean cows here, ever. Those kind never stick around past 6 months of age. All external disturbances can be dealt with either bullets or poison.
Yup!.. Cows see *everything*.. you watch them to see what's around
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
Granny used top run off anything in the pasture other then cows. She even chased turkeys, deer, crows and possums, etc.. It wasn;t long and all of the rest of the cows started getting into keeping trespassers out of the pastures. Sincew she has gone, there isn;t lead cow and now it's not unusual to see coyotes take short cuts through the pastures, deer feed right along side the herd. They still don;t like dogs. Shortly after we got her, an emu got into the pature. That thing had everyone all spunup and running their brains out. Untill then, Granny had barely tolerated me or anyone else around her. She would give you that evil eye, like just give me a reason and I'll kill you. I shot the emu and dragged it out the back gate of the pasture. Granny followed along with her nose to the ground like a hound trailing the corpse. That evening when I fed, Granny walked up to me and just stood next to me. No evil eye. I guess she decided that I actually had some value. From that day on the whole herd got more calm with people around. Still wouldn;t let strange critters in the pasture though.
 

ez14.

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2017
Messages
1,400
Reaction score
2
Location
west MI
Bigfoot":bo6ki12l said:
ez14.":bo6ki12l said:
how old are the kids that are helping you?

there is nothing like a good scare to teach a kid to watch out and pay attention! :nod:

12 and 9.
having some mean cows around might not be a bad thing! but how mean a cow can your kids handle is the question! they will probably never forget the lessons that a few mean cows can teach! (i know i've learned somethings that i dont think i'll ever forget :nod: )


and most kids can handle more than most parents think! they just need a chance to learn
 

frieghttrain

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Messages
785
Reaction score
2
Location
south/east MN
ez14.":1iqns54v said:
Bigfoot":1iqns54v said:
ez14.":1iqns54v said:
how old are the kids that are helping you?

there is nothing like a good scare to teach a kid to watch out and pay attention! :nod:

12 and 9.
having some mean cows around might not be a bad thing! but how mean a cow can your kids handle is the question! they will probably never forget the lessons that a few mean cows can teach! (i know i've learned somethings that i dont think i'll ever forget :nod: )


and most kids can handle more than most parents think! they just need a chance to learn
Well said ez :clap:
 

greybeard

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Messages
19,323
Reaction score
32
Location
Cleveland Tx
dun":t8fra6a6 said:
. That evening when I fed, Granny walked up to me and just stood next to me. No evil eye. I guess she decided that I actually had some value.
:D
You do have a way with words dun.
Usually, it's US that are deciding if a Cow has value--not the other way around.
(I've sometimes wondered just what's going on in a cow's head)

wacocowboy, my beefmasters have gotten way TOO friendly. I can't walk or drive thru a gate anymore without them wanting to come too. I have one that gets a little antsy when she has a calf by her, but even she has become way too much of a 'pet' and I'm not real comfortable with it--she's got a set of stickers on her head and..it's them kind that worries me more than any other--they'll hurt ya just trying to get close to you.
 
OP
Bigfoot

Bigfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
12,826
Reaction score
40
Location
Kentucky
I think some of us are talking about 2 different things. I'm not talking about a high headed cow, that gets antsy when she's in a corner. I'm talking about head hunters. Your blocking the sorting hole on a horse, and she tries to jump the horse. That sort of thing.
 

wacocowboy

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2013
Messages
3,201
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Texas
greybeard":341mtqt3 said:
dun":341mtqt3 said:
. That evening when I fed, Granny walked up to me and just stood next to me. No evil eye. I guess she decided that I actually had some value.
:D
You do have a way with words dun.
Usually, it's US that are deciding if a Cow has value--not the other way around.
(I've sometimes wondered just what's going on in a cow's head)

wacocowboy, my beefmasters have gotten way TOO friendly. I can't walk or drive thru a gate anymore without them wanting to come too. I have one that gets a little antsy when she has a calf by her, but even she has become way too much of a 'pet' and I'm not real comfortable with it--she's got a set of stickers on her head and..it's them kind that worries me more than any other--they'll hurt ya just trying to get close to you.

Mine are the exact same way you go to a gate and they think they need to come along. I don't have any with horns just nubs. My bulls that I am selling are just big old babies they follow me around and talk when I am in there pasture. I have noticed the Beefmaster heifers are a bit high headed till they have a calf then settle.
 

Latest posts

Top