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Arabian Horse has attitude!

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Ellie May

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Could anybody help me? Our arabian horse has an attitude. You walk up to her she puts her butt in your face & her ears back. She is very touchy around her flanks, backs legs, & behind her shoulds where her girth goes. The people I got her from says at one time she was abused. Also when I get on her she walks ok but doesn't go any faster. When I get her to trot she bucks then when she gets into a trot she decides to turn home I end up turning her into a circle then try again. We do the same thing over and over. Any body have any advice??
Ellie May
 
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Ellie May

Ellie May

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She is an old horse, about 18! She reimnds me of you!
Besides I thought you didn't know much about horses I thought you were into cattle!
 

D.R. Cattle

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I was breaking horses before you were born. Team roped and calf roped on a competitive level before you were born. I roped against Speedy, the current world team roper champ, Rabe Rabon, one time world champ calf roper, and D.R. Daniels a champion calf roper, to name a few (they whipped me but at least I was on the level). I know a tiny bit about horses. The first thing you should know is that Arabians are bred to be very spirited and long winded animals. That doesn't necessarily mean they kick or bite. If she lays her ears back at you, you are going to get hurt very soon. This is when you should refrain from being nice, stop feeding her cookies, and teach her a little respect. Better yet, you should ask your father to help you. A mean old mare like that would break you in half. If you are a seasoned rider, lay your spurs into her if she pulls the lazy business on you again. But be prepared for bucking and resistance. If she bucks and kicks, don't let her throw you. You have to a little mean and forceful, grit your teeth. She will get the picture real soon and become submissive. If all else fails, do what most on this board do. Trade her in on a Kawasaki.
 
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Ellie May

Ellie May

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Thank you for a nice response. I haven't fell off a horse since I was 10. Anyways she gives a buck or 2. Most of our horses give in when I teach them who's boss. I'm not really hard with them though. I was just worried that since she is about 18 if it would hurt her to be rough. Since she is about 15 hands and I'm about 6 foot she tends to have an attitude & put her but to me when she don't want me to catch her.
Ellie May
 

D.R. Cattle

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Her attitude is what's hurting her. She's not too old to learn who's in charge, as long as you can make that happen. When I say 'rough" I don't mean sensless beating. I mean ride and do excercises with her that she doesn't like and force her to do it. Reward her for positive change. Definitely don't let her start that barn sour garbage. Use a heavier bit if you must.
 
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Ellie May

Ellie May

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Well she don't do good with bits, she got to where she wouldn't open her mouth, put her head way high, and run when you tried to put a bit in her mouth. I changed to a hackmore she does better but still thinks she is all that.
Ellie May
 

Jake

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Unless their too old to ride their not to old to be taught some respect. DON'T let her think about bucking you off and then when your done with teaching her who's boss go trade her for a well broke Quarter Horse just don't let her leave your farm thinking she's beat you.
 

Beefy

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Why did you get an Arabian in the first place? that was just asking for trouble.

like most arabians, she's probably figured out from previous owners that if she shows her butt and pitches a fit they'll give up and leave her alone. so now you have to fix that. the good news is its just a behavioral problem. the bad news is when you think youve fixed it, think again. it will take a lot of work. good luck.
 
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Anonymous

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Ellie Don't let her get the best of you. Arabians are smart and when the learn something positive or neg, then they remember! She needs a good trainer all that you discribe can change and she could be a good horse.I say could because you need to lesson with her after all she will be your horse. If you know how to train then go ahead but she really needs some round pen training for respect!! This way she will learn to respect you and your voice...Cindy
 

Jay

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Ellie-
Your mare's 'attitude' is a blatent sign of disrespect to you. When a horse wheels around & shows you it's butt--it is saying "I'm the boss & you aren't gonna mess with me". She must be a 'lead mare' they are the hardest to break of this. Go to Marv M. Walkers' website--his 'herd dynamics' will explain it to ya better than I can. Remember--horses are herd animals & there is a pecking order. You have to show her YOU are the lead horse when you are around--BAR NONE.
Oh how many times I wished *I* could pin my ears back to let them know that I dissaproved of certain behaviors!! Be careful--right now she is just threatining (warning) you; but I have been on the recieving end of an angry horse (in my younger stupid years) and they can kick awfully hard & getting bit isn't any nicer. Your mare will take alot of time & patience for 2 reasons. She is older (more set in her ways) and she has been abused. She has obviously figured out how to get around doing anything she doesn't want to do. Be firm & don't back down. She will figure out in time you don't mean to hurt/abuse her & it'd make HER life easier if she just go along & do what you ask. Like I said, be careful & watch out; if she feels like attacking you; she'll do it when you least expect it! (That's what happened to me)
Go to that website & trust me--you'll learn some new and simple twists on horses.
 
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Ellie May

Ellie May

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No actually she's not the boss mare my Quarter Horse is. Well I've always liked Arabians I think their pretty. And her previous owner warned me Arabians are a totally different kind of horse. The only reason why we got her the people needed donkeys to keep away coyotes so we trade 3 of our donkeys for her. She had other horses but she was the only broke one. You think that if she was abused like they said it would have anything to do with it?? Also when she gives me her butt what do I do to stop her?
Thanx,
Ellie May
 

Jay

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When your Arab turns her butt to you-go around towards her head; EVERY time she does this. This is letting her know that YOU do not like what she is doing & you aren't liking her lack of respect. Sit around awhile & watch the horses. HOW do they tell each other "you're in my space-get away!" They sometimes just have to pin their ears back. Sometimes a horse challenges them & the next move is....pin your ears & swing your butt around. That horse is telling the other one-"leave me alone or I'm not going to be nice to you!" When a horse does it to a person; it's the same message; in a horse's language. I have gone as far as to do the same back to them--even kicking out to them. The only bad thing about this is: you have to turn your back to the horse--sometimes making YOU a prime target. But you have to follow through by 'talking' to them in horse language--what THEY understand. (Think 'pecking order')
OK, here is some info you might ba able to use from Marv Walker's website:
Horses seem to have everything figured out when left to their own devices in a herd even though there were clearly was a constantly changing "pecking order" in the herd.

Put a human in the middle of all this and the next thing you know, you have chaos, and disharmony. The unity connection is lost and much time is spent striking a happy medium trying to get the horse to conform to human herd dynamics.

In observing horses free of human influence I have noticed that nature has set up a rule that says :!: "You have the individual rights you are capable of taking and enforcing and you honor the rights of those who are more able to do that than you are." :!: This rule is accepted by all horses. The horse who the most able to take rights becomes the leader. Ranked behind that horse according to their ability to take rights are all the other herd members in what has come to be called the "pecking order"..

The factor that has the greatest amount of influence in this dynamic is the DETERMINATION of the horse taking the right. If one horse is eating and a higher ranked horse comes up and says, "I'm taking this," the lower horse has ONLY two choices - it either must honor the superior horse's right or it must challenge and take the right for itself.

Horses understand and accept and are 100% comfortable with that dynamic. They know exactly what is expected of them when presented with an action - honor it or challenge it. As I have said, the absence of fear is confidence. Confidence is the assurance you can handle what is expected of you. In a herd, you are expected to challenge or accept. That's it. ALL horses can do that.

The more determined a horse is to take rights, the more lesser determined horses honor those rights. This is evidenced by the fact that some horses expend very little energy to take rights, pinned ears are often enough effort.

I hope all of this helps--Jay
 

CopeMan

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D.R. Cattle":3a9lbxki said:
I was breaking horses before you were born. Team roped and calf roped on a competitive level before you were born. I roped against Speedy, the current world team roper champ, Rabe Rabon, one time world champ calf roper, and D.R. Daniels a champion calf roper, to name a few (they whipped me but at least I was on the level). I know a tiny bit about horses. The first thing you should know is that Arabians are bred to be very spirited and long winded animals. That doesn't necessarily mean they kick or bite. If she lays her ears back at you, you are going to get hurt very soon. This is when you should refrain from being nice, stop feeding her cookies, and teach her a little respect. Better yet, you should ask your father to help you. A mean old mare like that would break you in half. If you are a seasoned rider, lay your spurs into her if she pulls the lazy business on you again. But be prepared for bucking and resistance. If she bucks and kicks, don't let her throw you. You have to a little mean and forceful, grit your teeth. She will get the picture real soon and become submissive. If all else fails, do what most on this board do. Trade her in on a Kawasaki.
 
A

Anonymous

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That can DEFINITELY be a problem! But don't give up hope. Maybe watch RFD, a TV channel with all kinds of horsemanship clinics. Just let her know whos boss, but don't be too harsh because you did say that at one time she was abused. She still remembers that so don't treat her meanly. Hey, ya'll might actually develop a freindship! Good luck!
 
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Anonymous

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Patience is the key here! :) I like "Cowpoke's" idea about RFDTV. It's a GREAT resource! ! Hang tough! :)

I've had Arabian Horses for YEARS & it's funny to hear everyone bashing them. Arabians are only "Hot" if they're bred that way. It's just like ANY bloodline in ANY breed. I have some hot halter horses, but I also have some wonderfully calm & gentle Arabians that I am using for schooling horses at the age of 4.

It's ridiculous to say that "All Arabians" are bad. You can't generalize that way. If someone says ALL horses of ANY breed are bad, they're not a very good horse person. There are good horses in EVERY breed.....I just wish people were intelligent enough to know that.

Before you bash Arabians, why don't you go to a few QUALITY breeding ranches & see what REAL Arabians are like??
 

Linda

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Czargirl":1eulfr5b said:
Patience is the key here! :) I like "Cowpoke's" idea about RFDTV. It's a GREAT resource! ! Hang tough! :)

I've had Arabian Horses for YEARS & it's funny to hear everyone bashing them. Arabians are only "Hot" if they're bred that way. It's just like ANY bloodline in ANY breed. I have some hot halter horses, but I also have some wonderfully calm & gentle Arabians that I am using for schooling horses at the age of 4.

It's ridiculous to say that "All Arabians" are bad. You can't generalize that way. If someone says ALL horses of ANY breed are bad, they're not a very good horse person. There are good horses in EVERY breed.....I just wish people were intelligent enough to know that.

Before you bash Arabians, why don't you go to a few QUALITY breeding ranches & see what REAL Arabians are like??

I was riding my Arab this afternoon for the first time since last fall. Arabs are just different horses, but they respond to the same training methods as other breeds. They have phenomenal memories and are very visual horses. They spot things at great distances way before other horses do.

I only have the one Arab. Our other four horses are varying breeds, from Saddlebred to Quarterhorse. He is seven now, and it has been a fun learning experience over the four years I have been riding him. He is kind and gentle and macho and responsive and unbelievably smooth gaited. He is very sensitive to his environment, as are all horses, but to a greater degree. His skin is more sensitive to touch. He never, ever forgets anything, good or bad. He works cattle, is an outstanding mountain trail horse, & floats like a feather when loading into the trailer. He always challenges my training and riding skills, but in good ways. I wouldn't put a beginner on him, but he is fun for an experienced rider. A heavy handed rider could easily pick a fight with him, but he gives me no trouble - although I'm always working to think ahead of him.

I second the round pen idea. If done properly, round penning is the safest and best method of training a horse. My stepson bought a very spoiled 7 year old Quarterhorse mare. It took me two weeks of working with her in the round pen before she consistently responded in positive ways. She, too, would offer her butt and she was a kicker. I am still cautious around her, and she isn't my favorite horse, but she shows respect for humans that she didn't when she came to live here.

Tomorrow I start riding a sweet 3 year old buckskin Quarterhorse mare I received from my husband for Christmas. She was ridden for 3 weeks last fall, then allowed to rest for the winter. She's going to be fun. :D
 

Terri

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I have a mare that was starved and left for dead lying on the side of the road. She would turn her but to me (when she could stand) and walk away. I made it a point of never giving up when she did this and caught her everytime I went to the barn. Not just when I was going to work her, but every time. Also, I caught her before she could eat. I would have her feed outside her pen but wouldn't give it to her until I had her. She soon learned that to eat she had to come to me and that just because I wanted to see or pet her it didn't mean she had to work. She was also "home" sour. She was afraid to get out of sight of my property. Not just the barn. But I think that has alot to do with the fact that she was abandoned. She has "issues" away from home, If I'm on her she's ok. If not she is at my shoulder or up my geldings rump. Sorry, didn't mean to get carried away.
 
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Anonymous

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Listen to what everyone is tell you, some of the post have attitude but they are right on. This horse is warning you...if you don't correct the problem you're going get hurt. She will kick you, she is telling you that loud and clear with pinned ears and butt towards you. If she is in a stall don't try to get in front of her always leave yourself a clear get away, don't get pinned in the back of the stall with a angry horse between you and the door. Use a longe whip or the wooden end of a pick to smack her in the stall until she turns around, then make it pleasant for her to face you, unpleasant to turn on you. A horse with bad stall manners will kill you in a second, I know, I had a friend die that way. Remember that horses have been around for many many thousands of years and have only been domesicated (sp) for the last 3 of 4 thousand years they are more wild than domestic.

She is the lead mare as far as you concerned to her, you need to change that. Put her in a round pen and make her work, watch her ears and mouth. Her inside ear should be turned toward you, this means she is listening to you, if it's not toward you she is ignoring you, disrepectful, step towards her close the space between her and you (push her harder) until she listens, chase her with the whip if you have to.

Work her hard, past a sweat, until she starts to chew and lick her lips. this means that she accepts you as the lead and it's okay. You may need to repeat this 5 or 6 days a week for a couple of weeks. she'll change without laying a hard hand on her.

Once your in control, then she can learn to trust you, and things will work out alot easier...but be ready for a couple of battles. Arabs are hot horse and will fight back...Know horse talk and be careful.

My opionin,
Alan
 

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