Anyone Know A Trainer Who Saddlebreaks Longhorns?

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A

Anonymous

Hello! :)

I realize this may be a stretch, but here goes.:Takes deep breath: Does anyone here know of a Trainer in Texas who saddlebreaks Longhorns?? I currently have a 15 month old Longhorn steer that I want to saddlebreak next Spring.

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OP
A

Anonymous

> Hello! :)

> I realize this may be a stretch,
> but here goes.:Takes deep breath:
> Does anyone here know of a Trainer
> in Texas who saddlebreaks
> Longhorns?? I currently have a 15
> month old Longhorn steer that I
> want to saddlebreak next Spring.

You might try A Splash Of Color Longhhorns in Schulenberg, Texas. See their topic "Steer Riding" at the following link for a description of the training methods they use to break Longhorns steers to saddle.

<A HREF="http://www.longhornshowcase.com/Library/Training/steerride.shtml" TARGET="_blank">www.longhornshowcase.com/Library/Training/steerride.shtml</A>

You might also be interested in some of the many other topics they have on their website, some of which relate specifically to Longhorns but many of which could be of interest to any cattle raiser. See the list of topics at: <A HREF="http://www.asocl.com/factsindex.html" TARGET="_blank">www.asocl.com/factsindex.html</A>

Good luck to you.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> You might try A Splash Of Color
> Longhhorns in Schulenberg, Texas.
> See their topic "Steer
> Riding" at the following link
> for a description of the training
> methods they use to break
> Longhorns steers to saddle.

Thank you so much for the referral. :) I've read the article and have gotten a halter on my steer and put a leadrope on him tonight so he can walk around with it on in the stall. It got a little "western" LOL , but he's getting used to it already and is seeing me as his food source. He perks up when he hears me call his name and he's greeting me at the stall door and giving me plenty of "kisses". :)

By the description of the article and everyone's most helpful advice, saddlebreaking him should be pretty easy. Thank you so much for the advice!! :) Just one more question- I want to put a ring in his nose for a bit more control when I begin to ride him, but I'm really hesitant to do it myself. Is this a precedure best done by a veterinarian or can I do this myself and how/when should I go about it?

>
> <A HREF="http://www.longhornshowcase.com/Library/Training/steerride.shtml" TARGET="_blank">www.longhornshowcase.com/Library/Training/steerride.shtml</A>
> You might also be interested in
> some of the many other topics they
> have on their website, some of
> which relate specifically to
> Longhorns but many of which could
> be of interest to any cattle
> raiser. See the list of topics at:
> <A HREF="http://www.asocl.com/factsindex.html" TARGET="_blank">www.asocl.com/factsindex.html</A>
> Good luck to you.



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OP
A

Anonymous

Putting a ring in the nose of a steer or bull is not exactly the job for a "novice." And, the ring should match the size of the animals nose/head. Supposedly the "best" nose rings are those that pierce and then are locked in place with a set-screw. Minimum needs are a headgate and/or may need to give the animal a mild tranquilizer injection to calm him...would be next to impossible to properly pierce the nose and tighten the set-screw if there was ANY head movement going on. And, if there was an inadvertent injury, the Vet would already be there to treat the wound. In many halter-showing and/or bull-showing events (so I'm told) you cannot show a male animal in halter unless he has a nose ring to aid in tying him and/or leading him.

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