Any thoughts on my cross fencing

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Central Fl Cracker

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I have a total of 150 ac but I wanted to start small.

ranchfencing.jpg
 

mitchwi

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I don't know how many your head your planning, but get to the basics of the X-fence. Number of animals per pasture to last them say 1 week, with them not returning to that pasture until it has had 3 weeks rest. Now, that is a guideline we use in my area....there may be different variables in your area to consider. You are wanting to save $$ by having your land perform the best it can and stock to its potential.
 

Bez!

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I made a mistake once. Well, I have made more than most. :lol:

If I was you I would not waste any money on cross fence just yet.

Do the complete boundary first.

Then put up some pens for handling.

Then start on your cross fencing.

We did not do this on the last place we owned and regretted it almost immediately after we started on all the cross fencing. When we had the boundary finally completed we ended up changing the cross fencing to fit the overall finished fenced in areas.

Bez!
 
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Central Fl Cracker

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The whole 150 ac is fenced so I guess I just coould add one which would be on the far right.
I have not decided were to do the pens yet since my wife does not want it near the new house.
 

Bez!

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Central Fl Cracker":1pdv6hbu said:
The whole 150 ac is fenced so I guess I just coould add one which would be on the far right.
I have not decided were to do the pens yet since my wife does not want it near the new house.

In my country we like the pens where we can se the animals.

Horses on the west side of the house.

Cattle to the south.

Calves and yearlings to the north.

I hate it when I need to travel too far at night to see what is happening.

You go on with your cross fencing then - did not know your boundary was finished.

Make one of your pens out of wood or pipe - at least 6 feet tall and real tight - stouter the better. Need somewhere to put the wild ones - and sooner or later you will have a couple stop in for a short visit. :lol:

Regards,

Bez!
 

Texan

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I like pens close to the house, also. Granted, there are a few days out of the year (such as at weaning) when that would be a nuisance. But not enough nuisance to outweigh the convenience of checking sick cattle, fresh calves, etc. I guess I'm really fortunate---my wife thinks we need pens closer to the house.

I've found that it's also a good idea to plan pens and cross fencing so that you can move cattle through the pens when rotating pastures. Every place isn't geographically suited to this, but if you can work it in, it will pay big dividends in the future.
 

Bama

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Only thing I would add is if possible keep the gate at the corners. Its easier to push cattle through them than if they are in the center.
 

Beefy

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Bama":22drh6vp said:
Only thing I would add is if possible keep the gate at the corners. Its easier to push cattle through them than if they are in the center.

Amen.
 

flaboy+

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I would probably take the two 5 acre plots on the left of your picture and make a 10 acre plot out of it. I would take the plots on the right and make two 7 acre plots out of it. Rotate between the three.

The ten acres on the left I would put the gate up at the corner by the highway with the gate opening across your driveway. The opposite side could have a gate in the same area and the two could swing open to create an easy way to block them off from going up the driveway when changing fields. You would of course need a gate to shut of the driveway to the highway also.

The gate between the two 7 acres plots on the right I would put the gate up near the corner of your 5 acre yard plot. It's not exactly in the corner of the two 7 acre plots but pretty close.

Like others have said I would put the cattle pen up near the house but since you have a barn there that can house cattle? You could move those that you need to watch in there? If not then like others said put the pen up near the house so you can look out and see what is going on. My cattle pen is a long ways from the house but then again I don't pay much attention to my cows other than twice a year. They are pretty much on their own unless I see something that makes me move one up to the pen. If this happens then I just drive to the pen as often as needed.
 

eric

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Might as well ask it now before you get too far along....you got a way to get water to all these pens? Looks like most of them are'nt too far away from your house, so you should be able to run a water line from there if necessary. Like most folks around here, we just put a big water trough under the fence lines and let it service two different pastures at the same time. The 6'-8' long galvanized troughs work well for these situations. That and some pvc pipe has worked alot better for us that running water hoses ever did.

And I agree, gates in corners work better for me too. Can always put up a couple panels and make a poor folk alleyway/loading chute if you ever need to.
 
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Central Fl Cracker

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I have an existing 10" well onsite and I will also drill one for the House. I like the idea of splitting the water trough between fences that save me a lot of money.
 

Texas PaPaw

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Cracker

For cross fencing, including lanes, I use 1 wire electric fence. It is much cheaper & easier to build than multiwire fences. Also it is much easier to reconfigure when you come up with a better layout. Trust me when I say "no one gets it exactly right the first time". On a new farm, I start with polywire, 1/2" fiberglass corner posts & 3/8" fg line posts. After 2-3 years, when I'm confident the layout is the way it works best, I will start replacing the polywire with 14ga steel wire as time allows. I do not use hi-tensile wire for interior fences. Due to the stiffness, hi-tensile is more difficult to work with and the soft 14ga has been more than durable enough for me.

Would highly recommend building lanes to connect all pastures & your corral. If configured properly, 1 person can easily bring animals to the corral for treatments, working, shipping, etc. This will make your life so much easier when the inevitable problems do occur and an animal needs immediate care.

The attached link is for Kencove, where I buy most of my fencing materials. Even if you never buy from them, request their free catalog. It has many excellent fencing tips. BTW-they are excellent people to do business with & price competitive. They ship mostly by UPS with 3-4 day delivery direct to your place.

http://www.kencove.com/

IMO-some critical rules for electric fence:

1. Do not skimp on the size of charger (energiser) For 150 acres, I would recommend nothing smaller than 6 joule output. You will most likely be disappointed with anything of lower output during adverse conditions such as very damp weather, heavy green grass or brush growing up into fence, etc.

2. Adequate grounding & lightning protection is also critical. Carefully follow mfg directions for number & size of ground rods. Also install lighning diverter & choke coil on fence side of charger and a surge protector on the AC outlet you plug charge into. There are some sensitive electronics that need protection from both the AC & fence side.

3. Electric fence training for animals. I have a small (60' x 200' ) trap connected to my corral that has a 5 wire barbed wire perimeter fence + 1 offset hot wire. All newly purchased animals spend their first 12-24 hrs in this trap. This small trap allows each animal to get direct experience with a hot wire with the barbed wire as a backup. For most, 1 touch is all it takes however their are a few slow learners who have to get hit 2 or maybe 3 times. If their first experience is very painful they don't want another dose.

IMO-Polywire with 9 strands of stainless steel wire is the most durable. Well worth the extra cost over 3 or 6 strand. Limit individual runs of polywire to no more than 1/2 mile to minimize voltage drop. If necessary use steel wire as a feeder to the far reaches of your farm. Maintaining high voltage is the key to effective electric fence.

By using electric cross fencing you can do a lot more for the same investment compared to multiwire fencing.

For water distribution, I use 1" high density polyethelyene pipe that is UV stabilized. This can be buried or just laid no top of the ground. I lay it above ground until I'm sure of the best layout, then bury it. The high density has been used above ground without freeze damage as far north as Missouri & Kentucky, maybe even farther north. Shouldn't be a problem in Florida.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Good luck & happy trails.

Brock
 

SPRINGER FARMS MURRAY GRE

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One Website to check is http://www.caf.wvu.edu/~forage/5718.htm
on configuring paddocks. Use your waterpoint as the center of your configuration,plan your paddocks into slices of pie,moving the cattle through the center point to get water.I will try to find the website with this configuration drawn out so you can see it.Makes moving the cattle from one paddock to another easier and you do not have to put waterpoints in each paddock. 8) ;-) :cboy:
 

GaryDG

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Two comments:

1) You may want a small gate between your house and the 5ac area

2) A cattle gate netween ac3 & ac4 will help facilitate sorting - for example if you have livestock in ac3 and ac4, and you want to move the ac3 livestock to a truck on the easement, going directly to ac5 from ac3 will make things easier.
 

GaryDG

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You might consider:

1) where your loading area is

2) your squeeze chute area/how are you going to crowd your animals for inspection/medical treatment

3) the sequence for pasture rotation, if required

good luck!
 

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