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Any old Ag books?

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brandonm_13

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Just wondering if any of you have come across any interesting Ag books of the past? I have two.

The oldest was first printed in 1908. My copy is 1914. It is a Tennessee schools Agriculture book. My mom found it in an old stack of books somewhere and thought I would be interested. I was looking through it last night. The section on beef breeds was interesting. They only mentioned 4 beef breeds. All others were known as scrub cattle or dairy cattle. Since it was the turn of the century, there wasn't any continental influence. The breeds they had were Aberdeen-Angus. I think other names were black aberdeen's or polled black(no mention of anugs as the only name then.) They were rcognized as being slightly smaller than the hereford and shorthorn. The standard hereford cow at that time was 1500 lbs. The fourth breed, and the only one not to have really taken off, was the Red Polled cow (not Red Poll, but red Polled). It also mentioned that hereford cattle were almost twice the size of a Jersey cow. It said Jersey's were the most numerous cattle in teh United states. It also included Guernsey, stating they were slightly larger and more coarse, but butterfat was about equal. The Holstein Friesan(they didn't just use holstein and they actually gave a pronunciation for the holstein, but not the other two) was said to give more milk, although not very rich. it could give up to 10 gallons a day.

I think it's interesting that in 100 years, we've changed that much.

Herefords were at least 1500 lbs.
Jersey's were apparently even smaller than today, and were by far the most numerous.
Angus wasn't considered the "official" title of the cow
Holstein's had to be pronouced so apparently they weren't as well known as other cows.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot. The hand drawn picture of the ideal cow wasn't bad from a side view, but the ideal cow was supposed to be brick shaped. Lower quality cuts of meat and waste was supposed to be kept to a minimum, so necks were supposed to be very short(cheap meat).

If I remember anything else, Ill add it later.
 

dun

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The oldest one I have is titled "Farming for boys and girls" published in 1937
 

Jovid

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brandonm_13":yk7yglqy said:
Just wondering if any of you have come across any interesting Ag books of the past? I have two.

The oldest was first printed in 1908. My copy is 1914. It is a Tennessee schools Agriculture book. My mom found it in an old stack of books somewhere and thought I would be interested. I was looking through it last night. The section on beef breeds was interesting. They only mentioned 4 beef breeds. All others were known as scrub cattle or dairy cattle. Since it was the turn of the century, there wasn't any continental influence. The breeds they had were Aberdeen-Angus. I think other names were black aberdeen's or polled black(no mention of anugs as the only name then.) They were rcognized as being slightly smaller than the hereford and shorthorn. The standard hereford cow at that time was 1500 lbs. The fourth breed, and the only one not to have really taken off, was the Red Polled cow (not Red Poll, but red Polled). It also mentioned that hereford cattle were almost twice the size of a Jersey cow. It said Jersey's were the most numerous cattle in teh United states. It also included Guernsey, stating they were slightly larger and more coarse, but butterfat was about equal. The Holstein Friesan(they didn't just use holstein and they actually gave a pronunciation for the holstein, but not the other two) was said to give more milk, although not very rich. it could give up to 10 gallons a day.

I think it's interesting that in 100 years, we've changed that much.

Herefords were at least 1500 lbs.
Jersey's were apparently even smaller than today, and were by far the most numerous.
Angus wasn't considered the "official" title of the cow
Holstein's had to be pronouced so apparently they weren't as well known as other cows.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot. The hand drawn picture of the ideal cow wasn't bad from a side view, but the ideal cow was supposed to be brick shaped. Lower quality cuts of meat and waste was supposed to be kept to a minimum, so necks were supposed to be very short(cheap meat).

If I remember anything else, Ill add it later.

When Red Polls where first brought over in the 1800's they were called Red Polled. So the book you have is referring to the Red Polls of today as they were one of the first British Breeds established in the US.
 

R.N.Reed

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I have several,one of my favorites is a book written in the 20's .It has a short biography on all of the people whose portraits were hung in the Saddle and Sirloin club in Chicago.Its signed by some guy named Gammon.
 
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brandonm_13

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I Know it was the same breed. I just thought it was neat that their name was different then, although only slightly.

Oddly enough, I have a beef production book from the 50's. The only cattle that look like today's are the Braford, charolais(although it was spelled Charollaise) and the Red poll. The Santa Gertrudis looked pretty good, but a little fleshy.. The shorthorn, hereford, and especially angus was very short and very fat. The smallest hereford I have now is too tall, and probably 250 pounds too light compared to these walking tubs of lard.
 

Tom Underwood

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My oldest similar book is "Cattle; Breeds, Management, and Diseases," published in 1834 in London. It has 2-page descriptions and pictures of more than 50 breeds, including Herefords, Angus(horned and polled although most were horned and the polled ones are referred to as beginning about 60 years before publication of the book), Galloway, Devonshire, Dumfries. The book is described as "Published under the superintendence of The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge."
 

HerefordSire

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R.N.Reed":2znh6tqf said:
I have several,one of my favorites is a book written in the 20's .It has a short biography on all of the people whose portraits were hung in the Saddle and Sirloin club in Chicago.Its signed by some guy named Gammon.

Want to liquidate the book?
 

HerefordSire

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Tom Underwood":t7rzpc47 said:
My oldest similar book is "Cattle; Breeds, Management, and Diseases," published in 1834 in London. It has 2-page descriptions and pictures of more than 50 breeds, including Herefords, Angus(horned and polled although most were horned and the polled ones are referred to as beginning about 60 years before publication of the book), Galloway, Devonshire, Dumfries. The book is described as "Published under the superintendence of The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge."

Bill Gates could afford that one. Do you keep it in plastic to keep air out?
 

R.N.Reed

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Herefordsire,I was wondering if any of you Hereford guys would pick up on the Gammon thing.I ckecked the book last night and it was actualy given to a B.O. Gammon compliments of the Saddle and Sirloin club.I am assuming this was Bert Gammon son of Warren.The handwriting of the inscription is very fancy.
I dont want to licquidate.
 

HerefordSire

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R.N.Reed":tnoheeay said:
Herefordsire,I was wondering if any of you Hereford guys would pick up on the Gammon thing.I ckecked the book last night and it was actualy given to a B.O. Gammon compliments of the Saddle and Sirloin club.I am assuming this was Bert Gammon son of Warren.The handwriting of the inscription is very fancy.
I dont want to licquidate.

That book may belong in a Polled Hereford museum. I picked up on it. Does the B.O. stand for Back O. Gammon? :mrgreen:
 

R.N.Reed

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I could trade for the same book and like inscription to a Reid Carpenter or another Shorthorn breeder of that era that was a member of the S&S Club.
 

Tom Underwood

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Bill Gates could afford that one. Do you keep it in plastic to keep air out?

It stays in a Ziploc bag, and the pages are kind of brittle. When I pulled it out to remember the title, a few tiny pieces of the spine fell off. The pages are slightly yellowed, but all in great shape. I have read most of it. I bought it on eBay a few years ago for under $100. It was mistakenly listed under sheep, but I came across it somehow.
 

blackcowz

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I have a book about building barns that dates from 1881, but my copy is from 2000. I also have a related book on blacksmithing and one on farm machinery that date from 1901 and 1908, but my copies are from '99 and '00. Another great book was a little more modern one on farm machinery and also one on fences and gates. How things were built back then never ceases to amaze me.
 

robert

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1909 second edition of McDonald & Sinclair's 'History of the Aberdeen Angus Breed' bought off ebay 8 or 9 years ago, wound up in a bidding war with a gentleman I became great friends with til he passed away a couple of years ago. I read this at least a couple of times a year and refer to it often.

If you are looking for a really good read the book 'Neighbors' by Archie Leiberman.
 

donnaIL

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I have several, but one that was recently given to me that I like is "Feeds and Feeding" by Frank B. Morrison, it is the 50th anniversary (21st) edition. First editonwas published in 1898 was by William Arnon Henry. It is 1207 pages long and has a wealth of information on animal nutrion,feed crops and feeding them to livestock. It also has a section in giving various mixtures of different protien levels and different fattening recipes depending which forages are available. On the front cover in pen it hasd To: John F. Garrison Compliments of: G. H. Caywood.
 

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