Angus Hydro Calves?

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We recently had an Angus cow have a hydro calf, she had a C-section. The head was as big as a basketball. She has GAR Precision 1680 in her pedigree. I read an article in the Angus journal about Hydro and Fawn syndrome, and they want breeders to submit findings like this. Have any of you had this problem?
 

robert

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how recently? Did you send a tissue (ear) sample to Dr. Beever? Did you notify the AAA? Did you notify sire and dam?
 
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It was born over a month ago, before the publication. Dad's gonna contact them and let them know the sire and dam and if we can find the body, we'll send a sample in.
 

Frankie

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Dr. Beever has identified the genetic mutation that causes this problem. Again it seems to be a single recessive trait. If you don't breed a carrier to a carrier, you won't get a hydro calf. In other words, don't linebreed. They expect to identify bulls soon and start testing AI sires as they did with AM (Curly Calf). Now for Fawn Calf.....

http://www.angus.org/Research_Update_Hydrocephalus.pdf
 
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We don't line breed, but way back in pedigrees the cow and bull were related. We had already bred when the 1st AM reports came out, so we didn't have much choice. It's too bad all this stuff is popping up in the breed.
 

robert

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red angus shower":18qfyog9 said:
It's too bad all this stuff is popping up in the breed.

It's too bad it's only being dealt with now, could and should have been addressed long ago.

Linebreeding IS the solution that needs to be adopted for testing sires, seems to me that when bulls with 1000's of progeny 'suddenly' show up siring defects when it could have been addressed when a sire has, say, 1000 registered progeny and mating 35 or 40 of their daughters to their sire BEFORE they go on to sire 8, 10 or 12,000 calves in a single year.
 

giftedcowboy

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Long headed Dwarf calves are still a problem also....I wonder how many of those go unreported each year....I have a neighbor with a commercial herd whom had one this year....all purebred sires with several generations of purebred sired females.....
 

Frankie

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Got an email from ABS with a list of Hydro carriers in their line up. There were others, but these names jumped out at me: Dr J Analyst, Morgans Direction, Basin Franchise P142, BT Crossover (he was a double loser being a carrier of both AM and NH). All the ABS bulls in our tank are clean, thank goodness. :D
 

sizmic

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Genex and Select have their studs listed on the respective sites, not sure about the others. This does not look good!

Sizmic
 

angus9259

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sizmic":3nrz2s1h said:
Genex and Select have their studs listed on the respective sites, not sure about the others. This does not look good!

Sizmic

. . . . select sires . . . . talk about having all your eggs in the 1680 basket
 

sizmic

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List of all sires tested is online at the Angus site.

B/R Future Direction 4268 has dodged 2 bullets. :clap:

Sizmic
 

Frankie

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twistedxranch":33qmvf29 said:
I am confused here. What is the difference between hydro calves and the curly calves? It seems like all this nonsense with the Angus started when they tried to breed more IMF into the animals. Seems as though alot of the AM carriers were high IMF bulls. I wonder if a gene or two mutated?

Curly Calves (AM): http://www.angus.org/aaa_am_faq1.pdf

Neuropathic Hydrocephalus (NH): http://www.angus.org/Research_Update_Hydrocephalus.pdf

AM and NH have nothing to do with IMF. Yes, a gene or two mutated somewhere along the line. They've been there for many years, but these problems have surfaced because breeders were stacking pedigrees with certain bloodlines. Both of these are simple recessive genetic traits. If you don't breed a carrier to a carrier, you won't get an affected calf. Now we can test for carriers and stop reproducing cattle that carry these defective genes. But there may be a bull calf born somewhere today in any breed with a mutated gene that can cause problems if he's widely used in the industry.
 

redluv

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Could be IMF, or maybe it's just a mutated gene. 1680 was a popular bull because he was a curve bender, high ww/yw, low bw (if I'm not mistaken). So I can see why he was so widely used, and how he could have been doubled/tripled/quadrupled in pedigrees.
 

robert

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redluv":1ppqi8ch said:
Could be IMF, or maybe it's just a mutated gene. 1680 was a popular bull because he was a curve bender, high ww/yw, low bw (if I'm not mistaken). So I can see why he was so widely used, and how he could have been doubled/tripled/quadrupled in pedigrees.

1680 was dead and buried until ultrasound came along and saved his sorry, defect ridden ass. He got used first and sired narrow, bad temperament, poor growth, low scrotal, hard doing, excess white, bad udders, most cattlemen who used him got rid quick, then ultrasound came along and somehow these narrow-assed cattle scanned well and his carcass numbers went through the roof and for some reason unbeknownst to me the Angus breed felt the need to go chasing after more marbling (IMF), and he 'had the numbers' well whoopdedoo.
 
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