Angus Derivitives

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Anonymous

I was wondering what you all thought of how all the diferent breeds are crossing them to angus and then registering them as what ever the other breed is.
 
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A

Anonymous

Sore point. By the time is 15/16th whatever the base breed is, all that's left is the color and maybe polled. So what's the point?

dun

> I was wondering what you all
> thought of how all the diferent
> breeds are crossing them to angus
> and then registering them as what
> ever the other breed is.
 
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A

Anonymous

What's your opinion on the problem some Angus bulls have with extra white. If these cattle are absolutley pure why do we still see bulls throw white ahead of the navel or on the legs after hundreds of years of selection ? If a breed has an upgrading program to purebred status I think it is a more honest approach than a closed herdbook where bulls may pop up with dirty pedigrees. The breeds that are upgraded from an Angus or Hereford base need at least 4 generations from the breed to be considered purered. That is often more pure than some of the "Fullblood" animals imported from Europe originally.
>I was wondering what you all
> thought of how all the diferent
> breeds are crossing them to angus
> and then registering them as what
> ever the other breed is.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Politics and Money? Ha Ha.

> I was wondering what you all
> thought of how all the diferent
> breeds are crossing them to angus
> and then registering them as what
> ever the other breed is.

[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

There's nothing the Angus Assn. can do about it, so I don't think much about it. There was some talk about starting a new Angus registry to establish EPDs for crossbred animals, but that didn't set well with a lot of Angus members. I'm not sure either way. On one hand, someone is going to register these crossbreds, why not the Angus Assn? On the other hand, I think producers are better off using a registered Angus bull than a crossbred bull.

> I was wondering what you all
> thought of how all the diferent
> breeds are crossing them to angus
> and then registering them as what
> ever the other breed is.

[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

I really don't know what's the big deal in black hide, but at least I get more money selling my registered full blood cattle than selling comercials, and to raise black whatever breed it's not big deal, the only reason to use Angus as the base in a purebred will be maybe to have polled cattle and the black color will brake the color essence of all the breeds giving a Black whatsoever, that for me is illogical to breed Black Limo Black Simmental or Black Chianina.

That's my personal opinion

> I was wondering what you all
> thought of how all the diferent
> breeds are crossing them to angus
> and then registering them as what
> ever the other breed is.

[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

I appreciate that the Angus association feels that they have a broad enough genetic base that they don't need to have a "breeding up" program to purebred status. But they are kidding themselves if they think they have a pure herdbook.

Years ago the American Angus Association promoted that two of the big advantages to using Angus genetics was to eliminate pink eye and horns.

I know of a purebred Angus herd 15 miles from here who battled a bad case of pink eye last year...how did that happen with purebred Angus genetics?

I have also had commercial producers who buy registered Angus bulls make the comment that they still get some horned calves out of their registered Angus bulls. Where did these bad genetics come from?
 
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Anonymous

I have a question though about the Angus association registering cross bred animals. Wouldn't that include most of the other beef breeds? I mena almost all other breeds have added angus to their animals.

> There's nothing the Angus Assn.
> can do about it, so I don't think
> much about it. There was some talk
> about starting a new Angus
> registry to establish EPDs for
> crossbred animals, but that didn't
> set well with a lot of Angus
> members. I'm not sure either way.
> On one hand, someone is going to
> register these crossbreds, why not
> the Angus Assn? On the other hand,
> I think producers are better off
> using a registered Angus bull than
> a crossbred bull.
 
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A

Anonymous

Pink eye can be caused by flies, injuries and other irritations. Dark pigment around the eyes makes Angus less suseptable to it, not totally immune. The breed has never had a claim of no pink eye. I believe you will find the claim is(or was, as I haven't heard it recently) no cancer eye.

As for horns in a crossbred herd, a pure Angus bull will sire 98% polled calves on horned cows. The other 2% will/should be scurred. Any calves born from 2 Angus parents that has scurs or horns should be reported to the association. It is very rare that this could happen this far along the line in Angus, but remember that when Angus were developed, horned cattle were in some pedigrees, as were some cattle with white and birthmarks. It is possible that a stray gene has avoided detection in some bloodlines. However with the diverse genetic base available it has become possible to ban or remove any animal that has a genetic flaw without shrinking the genetic base of the breed.

With the use of bloodtyping and now DNA, the purity and integrity of the breed is stronger than ever. If an unscroupulous individual were to try to propogate a blemished line, they would get caught sooner or later.

Jason Trowbridge Southern Angus Farms Alberta Canada

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A

Anonymous

They were not going to "register" them as Angus. As I understood the plan was to set up a separate database, collect BW, WW, YW, etc. and build a set of EPDs for these AngusX animals. If they should decide to follow through with that plan (and it's been tabled)it might put some of the other smaller breed associations out of business.

> I have a question though about the
> Angus association registering
> cross bred animals. Wouldn't that
> include most of the other beef
> breeds? I mena almost all other
> breeds have added angus to their
> animals.

[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

Angus bulls should not be siring horned cattle. We have had scurrs passed down in the simixangus cross breds. The calves that trace back to an AI simi bull all have scurs regardless who the future sires are. We have never had pinkeye inthe angus cows.
 
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Anonymous

I think the use of Angus cattle in the industry is both good and bad? Its good to use them for marketing advantage and traits. However, magacorporations, tend to isolate typing and harm sustainability of the industry due to one design.

We used Angus in our Diarmid cattle program to demonstrate to other breeders there is a way to utilize what you know to produce an improved beef concept for health. We can't sell our Highland cattle to normal beef markets due to horns. So we take advantage of three marketing programs,,,, Highland Angus Belgian blue to increase our marketing opportunity.

As the world environment changes, I think we have a very adaptable beef concept with Diarmid cattle, able to produce 13 colors, and have modified the beef for health beyond many beef programs.

Sometimes its good to be concidered a nut in the industry. It may take the mind of a crazy person to have a vision for the future in the beef industry.I call this the effect of a pebble in a big pond.

View our site <A HREF="http://www.blueoxfarms.com" TARGET="_blank">www.blueoxfarms.com</A> you may scratch head and wonder how a small ancient beef can achieve commercial usage combining the new double muscle traits of Belgian blue.We are finding the result amazing, increasing our weights while using a small low cost cow.survive, sustain, multiply... , all traits cattle producers need to pay attention to?

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