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Angus cattle and their temperament

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Anonymous

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I would like to know about the temperament of angus ( both black and red).
 

Frankie

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[email protected]":1d7yityc said:
I would like to know about the temperament of angus ( both black and red).

In Angus, the black ones, you'll find all temperaments. I'm convinced that handling affects temperament as much as genetics. We've bought several Angus cows over the years that were flighty but after a winter of being fed with our cattle, they tend to calm down. A friend who has a few Angus cows was here recently and we walked through the cattle. She names every cow on her place, tries to get them to eat out of her hand and she remarked that my cattle are very calm. They're not pets; most of them don't want to be touched, but I can walk within a foot or so of them and they don't budge. They're easy to move with a bucket and a call.
 

Jake

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There are going to be flighty animals in both breeds but their is also some very easy going cattle too. We have a few cattle in both the angus and the charlois herd that are a goosy but I can handle that for now while I'm young and don't mind the profit they give out. Our farm doesn't fit with the overly calm cattle that will eat out of your hand but you can walk through all of them without problems and don't have to watch your back.
 
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Anonymous

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I'm an angus fan and have a very thoughtful opinion. I don't care what breed you are looking at, but they all have good and bad temperments. I believe that the way the act is how the owner treats them. If you see them everyday, they are usually very calm. If you are the kind of person that goes and looks at them once a week or everyother, they are going to be spooky. If you see them and give them a treat (grain) every so often, they will stay tame. If the only time you walk through them or take time to see them is when you work with them, would you come back if the slamed gates behind you or gave you shots and scared you. My thoughts are treat your cattle as you want them to treat you.
 

D.R. Cattle

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Any cattle from any breed that are wild need to grow wheels or be capped immediately. Remove them from the gene pool. I cull them just for being shy about coming in to the feeders, because some momma cow that is shy is sure to make new heifers shy. Next thing you know you have difficulty with more than just the shy one. She leads the new recruits into her way of thinking.
 

Beefy

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thats true, one lunatic can ruin a whole days work by getting the whole pen excited. not to mention they are always the last one to get worked b/c they hide in the back and run around. and their calves turn out the same way. cull for disposition among other things.
 

Ellie May

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I concure with you guys. It is how you treat/train them. If you work with them day one you have a problem. While if you don't they will be easily spooked. Some breeds don't have to be handled as much though. Some of the breeds it seems like it just comes natural.
Ellie May
 

BLACKPOWER

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Ellie May":2hdqpeek said:
I concure with you guys. It is how you treat/train them. If you work with them day one you have a problem. While if you don't they will be easily spooked. Some breeds don't have to be handled as much though. Some of the breeds it seems like it just comes natural.
Ellie May

You spout off then you back track? You base your opinion off of one sorry looking angus bull (your own words) and you try to tell people that Angus cattle are wild. How old are you? O Yeah 15! How many cattle do you have? Probably less than 20. I wouldn't reply to your posts but I won't stand for lies being spread by you about my two favorite breeds of cattle Hereford and Angus. This better stay posted.
 

Ellie May

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BLACKPOWER said:
Ellie May said:
I concure with you guys. It is how you treat/train them. If you work with them day one you have a problem. While if you don't they will be easily spooked. Some breeds don't have to be handled as much though. Some of the breeds it seems like it just comes natural.
Ellie May

You spout off then you back track? You base your opinion off of one sorry looking angus bull (your own words) and you try to tell people that Angus cattle are wild. How old are you? O Yeah 15! How many cattle do you have? Probably less than 20. I wouldn't reply to your posts but I won't stand for lies being spread by you about my two favorite breeds of cattle Hereford and Angus. This better stay posted.

No I base my opinion on what I see, hear, & have experienced. Some things I'm against & most things I aggree on. And my opinion is just that my OPINION if you have a problem then to bad. Averbody has their right to an opinion. We have over hundred head of cattle. My Uncle has cattle, my grandfather had cattle till he died, my cousins have cattle, and alot of people have cattle, so just beacuse a measly person like you comes along & tells me I have no idea doesn't mean I'm not gonna try...and try to raise cattle when I'm older. So BOOOyah!
Ellie May
 

BLACKPOWER

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Ellie May":jvsaiz15 said:
BLACKPOWER":jvsaiz15 said:
Ellie May":jvsaiz15 said:
I concure with you guys. It is how you treat/train them. If you work with them day one you have a problem. While if you don't they will be easily spooked. Some breeds don't have to be handled as much though. Some of the breeds it seems like it just comes natural.
Ellie May

You spout off then you back track? You base your opinion off of one sorry looking angus bull (your own words) and you try to tell people that Angus cattle are wild. How old are you? O Yeah 15! How many cattle do you have? Probably less than 20. I wouldn't reply to your posts but I won't stand for lies being spread by you about my two favorite breeds of cattle Hereford and Angus. This better stay posted.

No I base my opinion on what I see, hear, & have experienced. Some things I'm against & most things I aggree on. And my opinion is just that my OPINION if you have a problem then to bad. Averbody has their right to an opinion. We have over hundred head of cattle. My Uncle has cattle, my grandfather had cattle till he died, my cousins have cattle, and alot of people have cattle, so just beacuse a measly person like you comes along & tells me I have no idea doesn't mean I'm not gonna try...and try to raise cattle when I'm older. So BOOOyah!
Ellie May


I think most people see you for what your really worth. An AIRHEAD.
 

BLACKPOWER

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Ellie May":3lfd0h41 said:
Yeah well yah know I wasn't born to fight & be aggressive & so oppiniated it's people like you who made me this way.
Ellie May

Welcome to the real world.
 

dun

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Close but not completely accurate. Occasionally a knothead is born. Calm parents, gentle handling, and mad as a hatter.
If you don't understand the mad as a hatter, ask your parents, ask them about PT Barnum also.

dun

Ellie May":1fovzts6 said:
I concure with you guys. It is how you treat/train them. If you work with them day one you have a problem. While if you don't they will be easily spooked. Some breeds don't have to be handled as much though. Some of the breeds it seems like it just comes natural.
Ellie May
 
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Anonymous

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Adding to what DR was saying that a shy or flighty cow will produce the same type calf. Durring a recent study, I believe done at Texas A&M, that same type cow will consistently produce a lighter calf at weaning.
 

Beefy

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Have you seen that new study, it may have been done here at The University of Georgia, about measuring how fast a calf leaves the squeeze chute? apparently the ones that haul butt out of there are your more high strung individuals and make you less money. I could have told them that!
 

WILD BILL

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I have had both angus and herfords for about 25 years and have had a few bad angus but not many. I feel the way the cows are handled has more to do with it than anything else. How much time spent and being quite around them is the key. we check cattle every day, mostly on horseback and have very few problems at gathering time. If you get a bad one remove it from the herd quickly. One bad cow of any breed can ruin 100 good ones when considering temprement and eaze of handeling.
 

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