AI and Preg Checking Your Own Cattle

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Yes blood tests are a little more accurate the further along they are. They will sometimes test preg when they aren't if they aborted recently. A good technician will look at anything suspicious and recommend a retest in a month or so. I use Cattle Stats in OKC. The tech is good and will answer questions if you have any.
 
Just back to the original question on manual testing, it is easier to give a +ve result than a -ve. If you go in at 4 mths and start bouncing a calf in there you are done and dusted. If you can't find that then you have to go back and find the uterine horns and carefully palpate those for any early pregnancy and often there will be a lot of doubt in the mind of an inexperienced operator. That is where the inaccuracy comes into it.

Ken
 
By the time you see the presence or absence of that rug rat on on the right you have potentially been feeding that open cow for a long time.
That's true. But I monitor all activity as soon as I turn the bulls out & keep diligent records. If there's any question, I monitor her behavior. Is she getting hunched by cows or steers after I pull the bulls? Or is she walking the fence across from the bulls pasture - with them directly on the other side, looking pitiful? And when in doubt, I will have her legit preg checked when we wean. That said, there's been a number of times a cow was preg checked bred, and I still had my doubts until I saw the rugrat on the right. False heats? Nothing cystic was noticed.
 
I used this urine preg test
It's easy, just rub them below their tweedle and they pee like a race horse. You dip a stick into the urine, read the results in 10 minutes. Cost $4.50 a test.
 
I had the beef science college students out last week. They learned how to pelvic measure and freeze brand replacement hfrs.
Then I let them palpate some of my spring bred cows. Most of those cows are 8 months bred. The expression on the students faces when they grabbed a foot or a head for the first time was priceless.
 
I learned to AI 40 yrs ago from an AI tech, who bred for select sires... he wanted an occasional relief tech, and I was far out of his normal area that he didn't want to have to come all the way out there for just one "family cow".... so taught me. He would have me work at least 1 day every couple weeks... and we had a big area and lots of dairy farms back then Then I took a refresher course SS offered...and when he had a mild heart attack, and was out for 3 months, I did his calls for that time...
Have not done much AI the last 8 years due to the joint problems.... but hope to do some this year. I will sometimes go in and do a preg check on animals that we thought were bred or were due soon.... I can feel one after about 5 months but just do not have the touch for shorter bred... We get the vet out to do the groups since he is fast and more accurate... uses Ultrasound... there was a vet that used to do alot of the dairies... palpation.... and he could get within a day or 2 of the AI date every time...
 
We do our own AI here and been happy with the results. Been at it for about 5 years now. Each year gets a little bit easier.
Wish i knew how to Preg test the odd one.
But I haven't been bothered to learn how as we get the vet out and if we can run them through fast enough it's only about 3 or 4 bucks a head. He uses ultrasound.
 
We hired a guy last fall to Preg check our girls. He taught me and I was less confident than before I started. Maybe it was because most of our girls were early in the first trimester. The guy was very helpful and knowledgeable but bottom line I really didn't know what I was feeling for. Looking forward to trying again this year.
 
Lunch on the left, rugrat on the right.
I've been thinking about that statement.... Yes, the reproductive tract is usually to the right side when performing AI. However, one year the Vet was out for a C-section. Said he usually does C-sections on the left side, because the guts are on the right side. Vet did the C-section on the right side due to my headgate/chute setup. I remember because I had to scrub-in and hold the intestines, while he fished out the calf. The 2 statements don't add up (right vs left), so I must be missing something...
 
I've been thinking about that statement.... Yes, the reproductive tract is usually to the right side when performing AI. However, one year the Vet was out for a C-section. Said he usually does C-sections on the left side, because the guts are on the right side. Vet did the C-section on the right side due to my headgate/chute setup. I remember because I had to scrub-in and hold the intestines, while he fished out the calf. The 2 statements don't add up (right vs left), so I must be missing something...
Believe it or not, I thought the same thing as nearly every cow that I had seen during C-section or seen photos of, had the scar on the left side, I assumed the calf was carried more on the left side. Then after that statement, I also wondered if it depended on which of the uterine horns the calf was carried in.
 
I've been thinking about that statement.... Yes, the reproductive tract is usually to the right side when performing AI. However, one year the Vet was out for a C-section. Said he usually does C-sections on the left side, because the guts are on the right side. Vet did the C-section on the right side due to my headgate/chute setup. I remember because I had to scrub-in and hold the intestines, while he fished out the calf. The 2 statements don't add up (right vs left), so I must be missing something...
When we milked the Holsteins, we would "bump" the calf at about 7 months pregnant to know when to dry the cow up for the next lactation. "bumping" was a quick trust with your fist on the right side of the cow in the rear half of the stomach area. If you could feel the calf bounce off your fist, it was time to dry the cow up.
 
I've been thinking about that statement.... Yes, the reproductive tract is usually to the right side when performing AI. However, one year the Vet was out for a C-section. Said he usually does C-sections on the left side, because the guts are on the right side. Vet did the C-section on the right side due to my headgate/chute setup. I remember because I had to scrub-in and hold the intestines, while he fished out the calf. The 2 statements don't add up (right vs left), so I must be missing something...
I've only had one c-section and it was on the left side. But like @Dsth, if I bump a calf, it's on the right side.

@gcreekrch, you've done a lot of c-sections. Can you explain?
 
I've only had one c-section and it was on the left side. But like @Dsth, if I bump a calf, it's on the right side.

@gcreekrch, you've done a lot of c-sections. Can you explain?
I haven't done many C sections however the reason is pretty much as described previously in that the rumen displaces all the intestines to the right side including the calf however in late pregnancies the calf occupies a big area and parts will be accessible behind the rumen to access the uterus and a limb or two and once pulled to the incission line forms a good plug to keep the intestines from pouring out.

Ken
 
I haven't done many C sections however the reason is pretty much as described previously in that the rumen displaces all the intestines to the right side including the calf however in late pregnancies the calf occupies a big area and parts will be accessible behind the rumen to access the uterus and a limb or two and once pulled to the incission line forms a good plug to keep the intestines from pouring out.

Ken
Incision on left side. Reach down to bottom of abdomen under stomach and you can find hind legs of normally positioned calf. You then turn calf on its side essentially and bring hind legs to outer incision. Intestines should stay on right side as you mention. When preg testing, in most cases you are feeling for larger calves to right side of cow. I don't know why, it just is.
 
I A.I. but have vet do fall vaccinations and preg check. He buys 3-4 bulls a year from us for his family ranch down in Kansas and does text consults when I have issues needing immediate attention. I would like to sleeve up and check a few when we preg check so I can learn to check the odd one myself before hauling to the auction barn.
If you can AI, you can preg test. You already know what the uterus feels like when the cow is in heat. 1st trimester it's going to feel bigger than normal. 2nd trimester you won't be able to feel it, but will be able to feel it. 3rd trimester you should be able to feel the calf.
 
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