Afterbirth

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

I have a seven year old cow that had a very large calf last Thursday night or early Friday morning. Her afterbirth was still attached to her as of late Sunday afternoon. I was told by experience neighbors that I might have to pull it before the it gets infected from heat and flys. I've done this only once in the past. When I tryed this time, it would not come out and broke in half with only about a foot still attached. The part where the flys and dirt was is now gone. Question: Should I continue to watch or should I get her in to the vet. She seems to be doing just fine eating and nursing the calf.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Just try to ignor it and quit worrying, won't hurt a thing. Although, it can get foul smelling etc,, really won't hurt breedback and if you mess with it, you could tramatize reproductive organs.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

I don't know what kind of experience your neighbors have had, but they're very wrong. Do not ever pull on the afterbirth! When you take this cow into the vet, ask and learn.

> I have a seven year old cow that
> had a very large calf last
> Thursday night or early Friday
> morning. Her afterbirth was still
> attached to her as of late Sunday
> afternoon. I was told by
> experience neighbors that I might
> have to pull it before the it gets
> infected from heat and flys. I've
> done this only once in the past.
> When I tryed this time, it would
> not come out and broke in half
> with only about a foot still
> attached. The part where the flys
> and dirt was is now gone.
> Question: Should I continue to
> watch or should I get her in to
> the vet. She seems to be doing
> just fine eating and nursing the
> calf.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Keep an eye on her so that if she shows any signs of fever or just going off feed you can intervene. Leave it alone! As long as it iit isn't hangin so low that it snags on things, she will pass it when it detaches. It will stink, you'll want to do something, but just let nature take it's course. Never, ever pull on afterbirth. Years ago the standard policy was to go in and disconnect the carnucles and pull the afterbirth. That ended up causing more problems then it solved.

dun

> I have a seven year old cow that
> had a very large calf last
> Thursday night or early Friday
> morning. Her afterbirth was still
> attached to her as of late Sunday
> afternoon. I was told by
> experience neighbors that I might
> have to pull it before the it gets
> infected from heat and flys. I've
> done this only once in the past.
> When I tryed this time, it would
> not come out and broke in half
> with only about a foot still
> attached. The part where the flys
> and dirt was is now gone.
> Question: Should I continue to
> watch or should I get her in to
> the vet. She seems to be doing
> just fine eating and nursing the
> calf.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

you're right here. never pull an afterbirth, but after it's detached i would flush her clean, just to prevent anything going wrong. it's cheap and it's easy with no risks at all. no reasons for not doing it.

[email protected]
 
Top