Advice on building a herd in Central Texas - sale barns vs breeders

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TdJ

TdJ

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They are skittish, spend most of their time doing the wild herd shuffle trying to hide from the lion, i.e. me. Maybe I should shower more often? 😂
I’ve kept them in an acre pen against my working pens to make sure they know where the water is and I can keep them close. Feeding them cattle treats, put a bucket and salt lick out for them. Trying to get them to tame just a little before I let them into larger pasture. They’re super pretty though, look forward to having them chill out as they mature.

311E5398-21D2-480F-86CB-49E37B5571DC.jpeg
 

Rafter S

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What kind of bull are you planning to use? Since you're waiting to breed them until they're two years old I wouldn't worry about low birth weight. By the time they calf they'll be almost at their mature size.
 

A.J.

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Nice lookin girls. They should settle down in time. You are doing right by getting them settled before turning them out.
 

callmefence

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Those are very nice calves. Good way to start. They're not all brangus you know.
Some Hereford influence in there but that's even better. I don't imagine all those are gonna calm down either. Just be prepared to cull any trouble makers. Don't settle.
A lbw bull to get em started.
 

Rafter S

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I agree with Murray. My goal would be to have them start calving at 2 years old. Calving ease bull.

I agree about getting a calving ease bull, but only if you're going to breed them to calf at 2 years old. You said earlier you plan to put a bull with them when they're 2. If that's still your plan I'll reiterate what I said above. Don't worry about birthweight, and get a bull that will throw solid calves that will bring good money. When you chase low birthweight you will often get low weaning weight also.

Those are very nice calves. Good way to start. They're not all brangus you know.
Some Hereford influence
in there but that's even better. I don't imagine all those are gonna calm down either. Just be prepared to cull any trouble makers. Don't settle.
A lbw bull to get em started.

Yup. Some of them look like they could be F1 Brahman x Hereford, which should make excellent cows. I also see one or two that could be F1 Angus x Brahman instead of true Brangus, which were originally 5/8 Angus and 3/8 Brahman.
 

Lee VanRoss

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If your Brangus heifers are 14 months and you wait until they are 2 years old you will lose a years production out of 12 cows
from which you will never recover. Rule of thumb. All heifers very seldom breed back and some will calve too late to remain
in the herd. A cow will never recover the value lost when/if she is moved back in the calving season. Another rule of thumb.
Don't let other people spend your "Talers" (I am guessing the red cattle were more valuable over there is because red cattle
handle the heat better than black. You will be doing well if you still have 6 of your 12 heifers by the time they are six years old.
Very seldom does one get the opportunity to top a herd at an auction barn and I am assuming such is the case in this instance.
Think pounds per acre and not pounds per animal. Iron and oil can be handy but they are not your friend so do not let them get
between the sun and the ground. and finally remember you are marketing grass through your cows so anything you can to
increase the quality of your soil should prove beneficial. God Bless and Good Luck < LVR >
Talers ? That is New Amsterdam Dutch and it is from Talers that we derive the word Dollars. Now you know!
 

gcreekrch

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Putti
They are skittish, spend most of their time doing the wild herd shuffle trying to hide from the lion, i.e. me. Maybe I should shower more often? 😂
I’ve kept them in an acre pen against my working pens to make sure they know where the water is and I can keep them close. Feeding them cattle treats, put a bucket and salt lick out for them. Trying to get them to tame just a little before I let them into larger pasture. They’re super pretty though, look forward to having them chill out as they mature.

View attachment 9059
ng a gentle old cow with them will gentle them down fast
 

Brute 23

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If your Brangus heifers are 14 months and you wait until they are 2 years old you will lose a years production out of 12 cows
from which you will never recover. Rule of thumb. All heifers very seldom breed back and some will calve too late to remain
in the herd. A cow will never recover the value lost when/if she is moved back in the calving season. Another rule of thumb.
Don't let other people spend your "Talers" (I am guessing the red cattle were more valuable over there is because red cattle
handle the heat better than black. You will be doing well if you still have 6 of your 12 heifers by the time they are six years old.
Very seldom does one get the opportunity to top a herd at an auction barn and I am assuming such is the case in this instance.
Think pounds per acre and not pounds per animal. Iron and oil can be handy but they are not your friend so do not let them get
between the sun and the ground. and finally remember you are marketing grass through your cows so anything you can to
increase the quality of your soil should prove beneficial. God Bless and Good Luck < LVR >
Talers ? That is New Amsterdam Dutch and it is from Talers that we derive the word Dollars. Now you know!
Your only looking at gross revenue not what it cost to get you there.
 

Brute 23

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@TdJ Have you decided if you are going to do a calving season or year round?

From running cattle like that I would not rush a bull in there, especially a heifer bull. I'd get a little more age and condition on them going in to winter and breeding. I'd find a moderate birth weight bull with good growth that you can use for years to come.
 

TexasBred

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Cattle are generally at the salebarn because they are someones cull cows. This doesn’t mean they are bad cattle at all. I know some folks that are culling cattle that are as good or better than my best cows. It’s all about management. Having a buyer that knows how to quickly spot these cattle in the ring is the key.
Around here most are there because it's the only place to sell them all at one time. Most don't want to put up with a cattle buyer coming to his place and trying to low ball him and then wonder if the check is going to clear. I've bought some pretty awesome cattle at sale barns. The junk usually goes to the packers. If one of yours is bought by a packer it was probably junk too.
 

HDRider

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Around here most are there because it's the only place to sell them all at one time. Most don't want to put up with a cattle buyer coming to his place and trying to low ball him and then wonder if the check is going to clear. I've bought some pretty awesome cattle at sale barns. The junk usually goes to the packers. If one of yours is bought by a packer it was probably junk too.
Most all of them go to the packer eventually, but you knew that
 

Lucky

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I’ve culled allot of really big fancy looking baby raisers because they wouldn’t breed in a 60-90 day window. I’d be willing to bet they’re living the good life on a year round calvers farm somwhere.
 

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