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Acreage per cow

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tommaso

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Hi to all, i have a basic question, it is my intention to open a ranch in Wyoming to raise water buffalos, at first i would like to have at least 100 animals. what do you suggest is the minimum amound of land you need and the ideal amount?

Thank you
Tommaso
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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Around here in Tennessee the rule of thumb is as follows.


One cow calf per acre and a half.


In texas it might be one cow per 10 acres.


In wyoming and for water buffalo there is no telling. I would check with your county agent to see what he thinks.


I would think probably one buffalo per 30 acres but I dont know.
 

R.T.

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The acre per cow/head are set by county.
Example Williamson county east of I35 the
stocking rate fewer acres per cow - than west
of I35 which is about 30 acres per cow/head
depending on your location and soil type.
Thanks
R.T.
 
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tommaso

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Is this head/acre enforced by the law or is it an advise they are giving you? is it true also for dairy cows? supposing you want a 100 head cattle you should need at least 200 acres correct?

Thank you
Tommaso
 

dun

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tommaso":3ni4jxlx said:
Is this head/acre enforced by the law or is it an advise they are giving you? is it true also for dairy cows? supposing you want a 100 head cattle you should need at least 200 acres correct?

Thank you
Tommaso
The only law that it has to do with is the "good managment law". Typically dairy cows are drylotted or supplemented so they don;t require as much pasture but they require more money to feed.
 

LazyARanch

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Water Buffalo????

In WYOMING????


hmmmmmmmmmmmm....

what would be the advantage to raising water buffalo??

I can't imagine an African water buffalo doing well in Wyoming.......

or am I off the mark here?? :???:
 

dun

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LazyARanch":eb9ck6hq said:
Water Buffalo????

In WYOMING????


hmmmmmmmmmmmm....

what would be the advantage to raising water buffalo??

I can't imagine an African water buffalo doing well in Wyoming.......

or am I off the mark here?? :???:
Knersie will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the african buffalo is the cape buffalo, not related to the asian water buffalo. Other then as a work animal the only thing I know about water buffalo is thaey are the source of the milk for Mozzarella cheese
 
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tommaso

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Mozzarella production is what i am thinking (high quality bringing everything from italy) since i am italian. The weather conditions ther are not much different with italy, where water buffalos are raised to produce milk mozzarella. futher more the pasture are much greener than here and land costs MUCH less! Wyoming would be perfect because it has very low taxes, and personally i love it. Would any of you think it is not suitable and have to move souther? From what i can see on the web the few water buffalos ranch i have red about are all in the north.

Thank you all
Tommaso
 

LazyARanch

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Sorry, I WAS thinking of the Cape Buffalo....

but still, looking up the water buffalo, they are raised in tropical and sub-tropical areas of Asia.

I don't think Wyoming can be called either!! They don't have a hair coat to speak of, more like
brahmans aren't they??

Tommaso, Wyoming is beautiful but harsh.... have you spent a full year there? Winter is NOTHING like
the summer!! and you would need thousands of acres for 100 cattle of any breed.

JMO

edit: by golly, I keep sticking my foot in my mouth!! Tastes awful too... hehe

did a little MORE research and here's a link to Water buffalos in the U.S.A.
http://cheeseunderground.blogspot.com/2 ... -mozz.html

apparently located in Michigan, Wisconsin and Vermont. HOWEVER... the land in those states is MUCH more productive than most parts of Wyoming.
I'll keep my uninformed opinions to myself now :oops: and I am going to wish you the best of luck
on your venture Tommaso :tiphat:
 
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tommaso

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thank you very much for the advise. i really appreciate it! all the advises that i am recieving now are really useful. I will look in those states now that you tell me that the land is much more productive.

Best Regards
Tommaso
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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tommaso":2qab73ek said:
thank you very much for the advise. i really appreciate it! all the advises that i am recieving now are really useful. I will look in those states now that you tell me that the land is much more productive.

Best Regards
Tommaso


Best of luck with your endeavor.
 

msscamp

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tommaso":3ui5hypo said:
Hi to all, i have a basic question, it is my intention to open a ranch in Wyoming to raise water buffalos, at first i would like to have at least 100 animals. what do you suggest is the minimum amound of land you need and the ideal amount?

Thank you
Tommaso

I don't know what part of Wyoming you're looking to start up in, but in Goshen County the stocking rate is 33 acres per animal unit. That rate is going to vary from county to county, but I'm thinking it isn't going to vary that much. I don't mean to rain on your parade, but have you ever spent a winter in Wyoming? Maybe I'm wrong here, but I just don't see water buffalo thriving in the winter in Wyoming - especially if you're planning on starting your endeavor in the northern part of the state.
 
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tommaso

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wyoming is just a starting point but if i find better conditions around a will change. However thoughout winter the animals will need to be shelterd and heated. this is what happens here in italy. they pasture from april to november then they are put in a shed thoughout winter. could this work there? (i am just the person financing the plan, i am a total ignorant in this matter and i am trying to document myself).

Thank you all for the help
 
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tommaso

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Than you very muche Dun :D . I have infact contacted Delaval for there self milking machine. It is has quite an elevated price, but they told me it is worth it on the long run from a labour hand point of view and a quality point of view. would you agree? or would you stay more on tradicional machinery?

Best Regards
Tommaso
 

dun

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tommaso":132wwcsu said:
Than you very muche Dun :D . I have infact contacted Delaval for there self milking machine. It is has quite an elevated price, but they told me it is worth it on the long run from a labour hand point of view and a quality point of view. would you agree? or would you stay more on tradicional machinery?

Best Regards
Tommaso
If the "self milking machine" is the robotic one, I would stick with the traditional machine milking methods. Just a persoanl opinion but I think the animals tend to be better cared for in he traditional environment.
The water buffalo assocition may be better able to answer questions concerning housing in different areas of the US
I'll add here that my only exposure to water buffalo was observing them being used in rice paddys and as draft animals. My closest associaiton was eating a lot of Carabao in the philippines
 
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tommaso

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In your article i have red that buffalos live in the caucasina areas; where the temperatures are muche severes than Wyoming, (obviously whith shelter and heating): however i will have to speak with an expert about this. If there are better raising situations in other states i will move my plans.

Best regards
Tommaso
 

chippie

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Just a suggestion. What about looking for a dairy that is for sale? You might be able to find something that would be more productive in a shorter time period.

It would already be set up. All you would need to do is add the livestock.

My brother in law has a dairy and my husband grew up on one. It is hard work and can be very rewarding.

Are you planning on having a cheese processing plant on site also?
 
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tommaso

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yes i am. it is to say that i would not be working in the ranch. it is ( i belive to hard work for me) even though i would love to hang around there to give a hand!!! ( probably only for the first week :cboy: ). it is a good idea actually, but is it possible to adapt the farm to a different breed?
 

dun

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tommaso":1xhhh6f5 said:
yes i am. it is to say that i would not be working in the ranch. it is ( i belive to hard work for me) even though i would love to hang around there to give a hand!!! ( probably only for the first week :cboy: ). it is a good idea actually, but is it possible to adapt the farm to a different breed?
The only significant variables among breeds/species would be the space requirements. I'm assuming the cows would be dehorned so that wouldn;t be an issue.
 

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