A stab in the dark

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SBMF 2015

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Had a guy call me this morning. In a semi panic.
Has some fall calves that were fine yesterday but not ok today.
I'll give you all the info I have, then post my educated guess later tonight.
Two calves out of a group of about 10. Still with the cows. No vaccines. Farm store mineral. Have access to round bales 24/7. Got let into a new small lot yesterday. Found these two this morning. 98.0 temps.61153369-0CCF-4B78-9BA3-F20FB6E8CB25.jpeg3E4738FD-E696-4453-8E66-1FEEEA2FA446.jpegA9139522-7531-461A-95B0-75A232B8D04E.jpeg
I literally took a stab in the dark, because he didn't send me pictures until after I told him what to get out of my office.

What do you'll think?
 
...no idea, not a vet
You can do an IV to help raise the body temp. pneumonia??
 
Okay, my guess (strictly a guess) is Grass Tetany. If that's right then trying to treat them was pretty pointless, but I made some broad suggestions. 20cc Baytril, 8cc Bannimine, 8cc multi min90, and 10cc Thymon.

Just got a message that both calves died.
 
Okay, my guess (strictly a guess) is Grass Tetany. If that's right then trying to treat them was pretty pointless, but I made some broad suggestions. 20cc Baytril, 8cc Bannimine, 8cc multi min90, and 10cc Thymon.

Just got a message that both calves died.
Too early for grass tetany, IMO. In my experience it kills immediately when it does hit.
 
Okay, my guess (strictly a guess) is Grass Tetany. If that's right then trying to treat them was pretty pointless, but I made some broad suggestions. 20cc Baytril, 8cc Bannimine, 8cc multi min90, and 10cc Thymon.

Just got a message that both calves died.
With all due respect, why wouldn't you refer them to a veterinarian? Even if your guess was right, the suggested treatment wasn't even close to appropriate.
 
With all due respect, why wouldn't you refer them to a veterinarian? Even if your guess was right, the suggested treatment wasn't even close to appropriate.
1. The vets around here don't seem to have time for the little guys. (I have 3 "large animal clinics" in a 7 mile radius, but I use a real cattle vet an hour and half away.
2. I've always been taught Grass Tetany is a death sentence. You prevent it you don't treat it.
3. I literally meant "a stab in the dark" I didn't think Grass Tetany until I saw the green grass in the picture. I wasn't sent the picture until I had already suggested the baytril, bannimine, and multi min. (Sick calves this time of year, you tend to think respiratory)
4. I've never claimed to get it right all the time.
 
As Kenny stated, grass tetany is treatable. The earlier it is found and treated, the better. If they are down a long time, results are not as good since internal organs may be damaged. Typical case is a down cow with a younger calf on green pasture after a weather change. Tends to affect older cows more than younger ones. Best treatment is an IV of injectable CMPK (calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium with dextrose in water). If a person can't do the IV, it can be given IP (intraperitoneal - into the side of the cow where it is more slowly absorbed). Best is IV. Can be purchased as a gel tube given orally in a dosing gun, but that might be more appropriate as a follow-up to the IV treatment or as a preventative or a treatment in the early stages prior to the cow going down. High mag mineral is normally used as a herd preventative in the higher risk springtime, but don't let them run out of mineral.

Cows with tetany tend to be nervous, excited and aggressive and a little extra caution might be needed when securing them for treatment and when releasing them. Put a halter on the down cow, pull her head and neck around toward her rear leg and tie the halter to her rear leg/foot to keep her head from thrashing.

CMPK injectable is a prescription sterile product. There is also an oral liquid solution with a screw off cap - not sterile and not for injection.

In addition to respiratory, a risk this time of year is application of nitrogen fertilizer (esp. urea) if there is any standing water in the pasture. Calves and cows drinking standing water with urea may be poisoned. And someone already mentioned old car batteries that can cause lead poisoning.
 

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