A little feeding project.

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gcreekrch

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Neighbor needed some money so I bought the light end of his calves, I can see how some struggle when a third of last years calf crop only weigh 325 lbs. They are green and will do well for us. A couple of old cripples in with them .E5AF0CF3-E20B-4E3A-BDB6-CB5D57E4E375.jpeg
 
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gcreekrch

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Who is the pudgy tall one on the right? He’s performing well.
SHE is carrying a Charolais calf and is on three legs. We will pull the calf and grind her up later this spring. I don’t like subjecting cripples to a long ride to the plant.
 

Silver

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I would bet you will turn a good dollar on them. How did it come to pass that these calves are so light? Assuming born really late, does he have quite an extended calving season?
 
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gcreekrch

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I would bet you will turn a good dollar on them. How did it come to pass that these calves are so light? Assuming born really late, does he have quite an extended calving season?
They were born from April to ? A lot from second calf cows. Last winter and summer were not good for a lot of cows here. The 21 heifers represent nearly half the heifers he had. There were some nice replacements there too. One tries to help the newcomers but they have to all reinvent the wheel.
 
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gcreekrch

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Best part of those light weights, is they can really take off with a little corn, and a feeder full of good green hay.
No corn here, freight is too expensive. They are getting a mix of pea screenings pellets and rolled barley. Lick tub and good green haylage.
 

Rydero

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One tries to help the newcomers but they have to all reinvent the wheel.
Isn't that the truth. New to the area or the country? Doesn't matter much though. We see newcomers here because the land value is lower than most places and they start showing us how to do it. Then a year or two later there's a dispersal sale..I always say they're in waaay over their heads when they start unloading sheep, lol. We've made lots of millionaires here though - it's just that most of them start with 3-5 and leave with 1.
 
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gcreekrch

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Isn't that the truth. New to the area or the country? Doesn't matter much though. We see newcomers here because the land value is lower than most places and they start showing us how to do it. Then a year or two later there's a dispersal sale..I always say they're in waaay over their heads when they start unloading sheep, lol. We've made lots of millionaires here though - it's just that most of them start with 3-5 and leave with 1.
New to area, we have been told that if one can ranch successfully in this area, we could be successful anywhere in the world. Land is priced high but those of us who have grown have done so mostly from bank sales created by those who knew better.
This country can be very generous.... with snow, cold wet summers, predators, mud, frost heaves and many other things that can cause failures.
Those who learn to live with her can grow a lot of feed cheaply, use lots of it to overwinter cattle, raise good quality calves and yearlings, enjoy the scenery and solitude and many other perks of living where our fellow man is scattered some.
Those that don’t either keep going until the bank moves them off or they sell at fire sale values to get away from here. When I came to this area 42 years ago there were 33 families here that had cattle, there are 8 of us left and two of those want out. Who knows, maybe a couple of us will grow further yet!
 

Rydero

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When I came to this area 42 years ago there were 33 families here that had cattle, there are 8 of us left.
Yes that's the way it's going. Old-timers say every quarter used to be a farm in my area. I've found a few nice spots where if you look hard and kick around a little bit the old foundations etc. start showing up. There's still quite a few guys around but many seem to be just winding down getting the last out of their old paid for equipment and cows. They aren't operating in a way that anyone could start out and make a living at it. Idk how many of the few young guys will last - more you know about where they started from and look at the iron, houses, barns, trucks, cows and toys they have the scarier it gets. I keep my course - buying land close to me and growing the feed and pasture before I add the cows. I haven't gone broke that way yet.
 

Dave

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There was a bunch of light green Char cross heifers at the sale on Wednesday. They sold cheap enough that I knew a guy could turn a dollar on the. But I was thinking too slow so they sold to someone else. When you go there with a plan you sort of ignore the other opportunities when they present themselves.
 

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