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4-h heifer *updated photos*

Show4fun

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This years little heifer - she' late Jan. - would like to hear comments
 

aussie_cowgirl

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There is a lot of air under her, but traditional limo types seem to lean more that way. Her legs look sickle hocked but that could be due to not being set up properly. Id train the hair to make her look deeper and practice setting the animals feet to identify whether there is an actual problem with her leg confirmation. She is feminine and long though which are positives and she should fill out well. When is the next show?
 

Show4fun

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thanks for the comments - when you say s/h are you talking about her legs being to far forward

our progress shows we attend start in mid Dec. and county fair at end of March
 

OLF

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She looks like a sweet little heifer. She has good muscle, and you have plenty of time to fill her out. If "Showing 4 fun" is your goal, I think you've got a real winner, but I wouldn't be surprised if she brings home a few ribbons too.

Good luck.
 

LoveMoo11

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Sickle hocked or "cow hocked" is when their back legs are not as straight, but more curved than they should be, and often toe out too.
 

Keren

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I think she's got potential. Sickle hocked refers to the back legs being set too far under her, and I'm confident that it is just a result of her not being set up right, and not too happy about being in the clipping frame. I think she's sound enough that it wont be a problem once she's a bit happier on the halter.

She does have a lot of air under her but she looks very full french, or close to it, and that is normal for her type. With time she will deepen and balance out but in the meantime, you are probably going to be placed down for less capacity.

She's a sweet heifer - feminine, long, with adequate structure. You should be very proud of her :D

Have fun with her and keep us updated as to how she goes at the show
 

aussie_cowgirl

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Keren":3huwc9yf said:
I think she's got potential. Sickle hocked refers to the back legs being set too far under her, and I'm confident that it is just a result of her not being set up right, and not too happy about being in the clipping frame. I think she's sound enough that it wont be a problem once she's a bit happier on the halter.

She does have a lot of air under her but she looks very full french, or close to it, and that is normal for her type. With time she will deepen and balance out but in the meantime, you are probably going to be placed down for less capacity.

She's a sweet heifer - feminine, long, with adequate structure. You should be very proud of her :D

Have fun with her and keep us updated as to how she goes at the show

I thought this too. It normally takes a while for the ff cattle to deepen and balance.
 

Show4fun

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Again thanks for the comments - we have lots of hope for her - I was watching her this evening while we rinsed and brushed her the moments come and go as to how she gets those legs tucked under - we just started working with her last Sunday and she's still pretty jumpy amd nervous

Red- we have no papers on her (the breeder stopped reg. about 5 yrs ago) but he said she was fullblood
 

Red Bull Breeder

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If you don't mind who was the breeder?? Being a fullblood most likely won't help you in the shows. Most judges in the states ain't never seen a fullblood.
 

Show4fun

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I don't remember his name I'd have to look it up - he has a small herd in Navasota, TX with a mix of full and purebreds and just raises to sell at auction - we just stumbled across him driving by looking for another place
 

2/B or not 2/B

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Yes, she's tall but she's very pretty. I don't know about show cattle, but I bet she'll grow into a great looking cow. We've had some great big limo cows here and they're impressive to see. I love all their muscle.
 

KNERSIE

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LoveMoo11":2egc7nxv said:
Sickle hocked or "cow hocked" is when their back legs are not as straight, but more curved than they should be, and often toe out too.

Sickle hocks is when you look at the hocks from the side and it has too much set (more angle than the ideal) Typically the backfeet will overstep the tracks of the front feet. It doesn't look pretty but a little too much set is far better than not enough. The opposite would be post legged.

Cow hocks is when you stand behind the animal and the hocks point to each other, very often seen in heifers, especially when they are in lean condition. Again a slight cowhock isn't the end of the world as far as longevity goes, but it certainly is pretty to look at. The opposite of cow hocked is bow hocked and that isn't seen too often.
 

Keren

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KNERSIE":avbwfs5c said:
Cow hocks is when you stand behind the animal and the hocks point to each other, very often seen in heifers, especially when they are in lean condition.

Knersie brings up a good point; I've seen many baby heifers look slightly cow hocked as calves, and at weaning time, but as they grow out, fill out, and mature they are perfectly sound. I've seen it happen so many times I no longer cull them for a very slight hockiness as a calf
 

Show4fun

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Thought some might like to see how she finished




and here are some pics of this years heifer we just picked up



 
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