2019-2020 Hay Pricing ?

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farmerjan

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We are feeding some 3 yr old hay that was stored outside. Losing about 1/3 the bale to rot etc., but that is fertilizer/organic matter going back onto the ground and improving the pastures so not a "loss" except for some feed value. The cows are really digging through these old bales though. We would like to put up a hay shed and it might get done this next year. The demand for small sq bales is increasing, and we can do more of them and fewer round bales and make more. It might mean decreasing the cow herd a bit. If cattle prices rise as I expect them to do in about 3-5 years, we will be ahead to sell down cow numbers and do the small squares. Have a friend that has an accumulator, and we may try using it for hay that gets sold out of the field. What we are looking for is more storage for wagons loaded with sm sq bales since many times we can't get it made and get the wagons unloaded. NO HELP is one problem. So a few more wagons where the hay can sit on them under roof is part of it... plus being able to store the better 2nd cutting rolls under cover.
Prices look to be about the same here this coming year at this point. But if it gets dry, all bets are off.
We are also going to put about 15 acres into corn for silage; part to sell and part for us. Have a dairy farmer that is looking for more land for silage so are working out a deal and will get ours chopped and bagged in the deal. This is ground we want to put back into hay so it will help having the corn in the rotation. Have some johnson grass moving into this field and some weeds, so it was either corn, or grain sorghum and I think he is still going to do some grain sorghum and then we will get the corn too. Will probably wean and hold the calves, as they will be born a little later this spring, and we may wait to wean until after the new year and sell in Mar/April. So the silage/haylage will be good. The calves we held and will sell in the next couple weeks, have done decent on the grain sorghum silage and it is alot cheaper to put in than corn. But we will get the benefit of the corn silage in this deal with the dairy farmer.

We will have to make a decent amount of hay to make sure we have enough for the winter though. We'll see how the weather cooperates.
 
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Stocker Steve

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Sounds like a good plan Jan. We are doing something similar on better drained ground : improved pasture - bale graze - SS based no till cover crop - one year custom harvested grain - back to perennial pasture.

Ran some numbers yesterday on buying light calves vs. selling hay. Rivers here will crest in about a week, so more demand for hay than for muddy calves. Beef cow hay is $110 to $140 per ton at auction. Calf hay more like $180 per ton, which is getting close to concentrate pricing.
 

Lrj505

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Here in the Southwest cow hay is $6-$7 a 60 2 strand bale. Stripped alfalfa is $7-$8 a small bale. Horse hay $10-$12 a small bale. Corn silage is $50 a ton delivered. .No hay is sold by the ton in New Mexico. We are by far the highest hay price state.
 

gcreekrch

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Decided a long while back that we have never been short of hay...……………. had too many cows quite a few times.

We have been using grain screening pellets for a few years now. 13 to 20% protein and have been cheaper buy than hay for 4 years now. 5 lbs of pellets replace 7 lbs of our grass hay.
 
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Stocker Steve

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gcreekrch said:
We have been using grain screening pellets for a few years now. 13 to 20% protein and have been cheaper buy than hay for 4 years now. 5 lbs of pellets replace 7 lbs of our grass hay.

How can they produce pellets cheaper than hay ?
 

gcreekrch

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Stocker Steve said:
gcreekrch said:
We have been using grain screening pellets for a few years now. 13 to 20% protein and have been cheaper buy than hay for 4 years now. 5 lbs of pellets replace 7 lbs of our grass hay.

How can they produce pellets cheaper than hay ?

They are a byproduct of export grain. I contracted 10 loads last August that were landed here for 10.5 cents per lb. Lot of hay in western Canada bringing up to 14 cents. A lot of the hay is garbage too.
 

Dsteim

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gcreekrch said:
Stocker Steve said:
gcreekrch said:
We have been using grain screening pellets for a few years now. 13 to 20% protein and have been cheaper buy than hay for 4 years now. 5 lbs of pellets replace 7 lbs of our grass hay.

How can they produce pellets cheaper than hay ?

They are a byproduct of export grain. I contracted 10 loads last August that were landed here for 10.5 cents per lb. Lot of hay in western Canada bringing up to 14 cents. A lot of the hay is garbage too.

Are you only feeding that in the winter months? How much are you feeding per head per day?
 
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Stocker Steve

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gcreekrch We have been using grain screening pellets for a few years now. 13 to 20% protein and have been cheaper buy than hay for 4 years now. 5 lbs of pellets replace 7 lbs of our grass hay. [/quote said:
How do you feed it?
 

gcreekrch

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Dsteim said:
gcreekrch said:
Stocker Steve said:
How can they produce pellets cheaper than hay ?

They are a byproduct of export grain. I contracted 10 loads last August that were landed here for 10.5 cents per lb. Lot of hay in western Canada bringing up to 14 cents. A lot of the hay is garbage too.

Are you only feeding that in the winter months? How much are you feeding per head per day?

Depending on situation, 5 to 8 lbs per cow, per day. 5 lbs replaces 7 to 8 lbs of hay per day. If we are feeding straight hay, 30 to 35 lbs per day for 165 days plus.
 

gcreekrch

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Stocker Steve said:
gcreekrch We have been using grain screening pellets for a few years now. 13 to 20% protein and have been cheaper buy than hay for 4 years now. 5 lbs of pellets replace 7 lbs of our grass hay. [/quote said:
How do you feed it?

The pellet puker my son made. Will have to send a couple photos to Bright Raven to add here.
 

Dsteim

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gcreekrch said:
Dsteim said:
gcreekrch said:
They are a byproduct of export grain. I contracted 10 loads last August that were landed here for 10.5 cents per lb. Lot of hay in western Canada bringing up to 14 cents. A lot of the hay is garbage too.

Are you only feeding that in the winter months? How much are you feeding per head per day?

Depending on situation, 5 to 8 lbs per cow, per day. 5 lbs replaces 7 to 8 lbs of hay per day. If we are feeding straight hay, 30 to 35 lbs per day for 165 days plus.

Oh ok it’s a supplement that you feed in addition to hay because it cuts down how much hay they consume. I thought you might be feeding it instead of hay.
 
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