2,4D LV4

Help Support CattleToday:

lifeofleisure

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
49
Reaction score
1
Location
Craig County, Virginia
I have a reddick 50 gal 3pt pto sprayer. It has a handwand and a boomanator (one wide fan 10-12 foot nozzle) . Directions say a pint to the acre. Mostly stickweed and milkweed. I get that with the boom but what concentration for the hand wand around fences etc where I may not be able to measure or estimate acreage? No cotton peanuts etc near me. Only pasture and hay. I stay clear of neighbors gardens by a fairly wide margin.
 

1wlimo

Well-known member
Joined
May 4, 2011
Messages
742
Reaction score
0
Location
Alberta
Calibrate your handwand nozzel as it was a nozzel on a boom in normal spraying. Then you can use the same mix no matter which method you use for application .

You can read from the nozzel thwe type and get the chart online if you do not already have one for that type.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
11
Location
MO Ozarks
To save time and effort I always use 20 gallons per acre for the boom sprayer. I use the same ratio for the wand, i.e. in a 10 gal tank I use a half a pint of herbiced. Granted you'll use more per acre then you will with the sprayer but it keeps things simple when I switch back and forth while spraying.
Something else I do since I cant get 100% of the stuff pumped out of the 100 gal tank in a usefull spray I pump the remainder into a smaller (15 gal) tank and use it for spt spraying areas that are more convenient to spray with the mule rather then the tractor.
 

johndeerefarmer

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Messages
365
Reaction score
0
Location
north Texas
I haven't had much luck with 2,4-D to kill milkweed, and a pint/Acre sure won't do it. 1 pint per acre is only good on weeds less than 2" tall and growing fast- like ragweed, bitterweed,etc. If it's already bloomed forget it.

Grazon P+D is a little better on milkweed but far from perfect. I have not had much luck at all, in less I spot spray each milkweed plant individually. If it has already flowered, the flowered portion will turn brown and fall off it you are lucky.

As far as the ratio for your spot sprayer, I would use 1/2 gallon of 2,4-D to the 50 gallons of water and add some dishwashing soap (several ounces). Not much reason to skimp on it, as its one of the cheapest chemicals out there.

Good Luck

How are things growing there in Virginia?
 

novatech

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
4,830
Reaction score
2
Location
Brenham, Texas
Acording to this site it is recomented to spray at flower or bud stage.Common Milkweed

Common milkweed has become a severe weed in cultivated cropland due to an extensive, deep root system, insulating winter snow, moist to wet summer conditions, tolerance to many commonly used herbicides, reduced tillage, and lack of human persistence in chemical, mechanical, and cultural control measures. Common milkweed is tolerant to most labeled herbicides. Control requires multiple herbicide application. Preventing establishment and spread of common milkweed patches requires continuous scouting and persistent control efforts.

Prevent seed production. Milkweed seed is highly viable and will germinate readily. Pappus on seeds allows long-distance travel and is responsible for establishment in fields. Common milkweed becomes perennial (capable of reproducing from underground roots) approximately 3 weeks after emergence. New shoots developing from established roots begin emerging in late April and grow more rapidly than spring seeded crops.

Milkweed control is expensive. Individual plants and small patches are easier and less expensive to treat than entire fields. Patch spraying covers only a fraction of the area of a broadcast application. Patch spraying allows use of higher herbicide rates with less expense than broadcast spraying.

NDSU Research Data -- Applied June of 1988

Herbicide Rate
pt/A
Fall 88 Spring 89
% control

2,4-D 4 36 48
Banvel 2 71 61
Banvel + 2,4-D 0.5 + 2 26 15
Curtail 4 13 6
Tordon 2 86 83
Roundup 6 56 99

Apply herbicides when milkweed is in the late-bud to flowering stage and actively growing. Control patches when small. Patch-spray glyphosate at 6 to 8 pt/A (up to 10 pt/A is allowed). Apply at late bud to flowering. Add ammonium sulfate at 8.5 to 17 lb/100 gallons of water. Do not apply after small grain is headed and only a maximum of 10% of the field can be treated. After heading, the application is regarded as a pre-harvest application and maximum use rates are limited to 2 pt/A. Patch-spray Tordon at 4 to 8 pt/A. Tordon residue will help prevent other shoots from emerging. CAUTION: Tordon residue will be present for several years after application.
http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/procrop/per/comilk06.htm
 
OP
L

lifeofleisure

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
49
Reaction score
1
Location
Craig County, Virginia
I guess I ought to ask before I do something sometimes.
I sprayed bout 16 AC last Saturday of a cut hayfield. Cut it 1st of June. Weeds are growing and about 18" tall. Rained hard Monday. 1.2 inches. I'm hoping I killed some weeds at any rate and get grass more in shape .

It is dry here but humid and scattered showers. Got .16 this am. Bette than alot of folks out there.
 

1982vett

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2008
Messages
9,522
Reaction score
318
Location
Central Texas
lifeofleisure":1ex3pckd said:
I guess I ought to ask before I do something sometimes.
I sprayed bout 16 AC last Saturday of a cut hayfield. Cut it 1st of June. Weeds are growing and about 18" tall. . Rained hard Monday 1.2 inches. I'm hoping I killed some weeds at any rate and get grass more in shape .

It is dry here but humid and scattered showers. Got .16 this am. Bette than alot of folks out there.

If you didn't it wasn't the rains' fault.
 

Caustic Burno

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2004
Messages
27,129
Reaction score
1,968
Location
Big Thicket East Texas
I don't know about the grasses in your area but think twice about using Grazon before you use it.
Grazon is a great product but comes with some negatives as well it can't tell good seed from bad.
Like in our area with the current weather conditions you couldn't pay me to spray Grazon as we are in a bad drought,
I don't want the first Bahia seed killed.
 

novatech

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
4,830
Reaction score
2
Location
Brenham, Texas
Caustic Burno":17h6wt2h said:
I don't know about the grasses in your area but think twice about using Grazon before you use it.
Grazon is a great product but comes with some negatives as well it can't tell good seed from bad.
Like in our area with the current weather conditions you couldn't pay me to spray Grazon as we are in a bad drought,
I don't want the first Bahia seed killed.
Didn't know grazon would kill Bahia. I thought it would only get broad leaf.
 

novatech

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
4,830
Reaction score
2
Location
Brenham, Texas
lifeofleisure":3658zwgn said:
I guess I ought to ask before I do something sometimes.
I sprayed bout 16 AC last Saturday of a cut hayfield. Cut it 1st of June. Weeds are growing and about 18" tall. Rained hard Monday. 1.2 inches. I'm hoping I killed some weeds at any rate and get grass more in shape .

It is dry here but humid and scattered showers. Got .16 this am. Bette than alot of folks out there.
The problem wouldn't be the rainfall but the fact that you cut first. You may get any newly germanated weeds but the weeds that have been cut have very little leaf as compared to root.
 

Caustic Burno

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2004
Messages
27,129
Reaction score
1,968
Location
Big Thicket East Texas
novatech":1so8b3aa said:
Caustic Burno":1so8b3aa said:
I don't know about the grasses in your area but think twice about using Grazon before you use it.
Grazon is a great product but comes with some negatives as well it can't tell good seed from bad.
Like in our area with the current weather conditions you couldn't pay me to spray Grazon as we are in a bad drought,
I don't want the first Bahia seed killed.
Didn't know grazon would kill Bahia. I thought it would only get broad leaf.

Grazon kills seed it can't tell good from bad.
 
OP
L

lifeofleisure

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
49
Reaction score
1
Location
Craig County, Virginia
Ok so I can't figure out how to post pics in reply but link below has some pics of the weeds turning yellow. Some I missed as well. Not sure I killed many and certainly not all

http://ranchers.net/photopost/showphoto.php/photo/11132/ppuser/4611

I wasn't worried about the rain washing it off but replying to johndeerefarmer asking how things were in Va.
Rain again today of over 1.2 inches this evening and still coming down lightly.

It always seems that the first mowing weeds pop out. Clover and grasses must shade out the weeds util after first cut.
I was just trying to stop/cut back the weeds before second cutting.

Rate I used was 3 qts to 4 qts per 50 gal with boomanator depending on which field, and how much ground I could cover. 2.5 gallons over 16 acres+/-

These aren't best fields but as Many have said beats feeding snowballs.
 

Angus Cowman

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2008
Messages
7,157
Reaction score
1
Location
the Great State of Mental Distress ( Florida)
novatech":rrovz59z said:
The problem wouldn't be the rainfall but the fact that you cut first. You may get any newly germanated weeds but the weeds that have been cut have very little leaf as compared to root.
Why would it being cut have anything to do with him spraying summer weeds now
I have hayfields that I spray in the early spring and then cut for hay in late May and they have no weeds but then some of the summer weeds will pop up after the grass has been taken off

The weeds that I spray after cutting are an entirely different weed than what was their earlier in the yr
 

novatech

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
4,830
Reaction score
2
Location
Brenham, Texas
Angus Cowman":3t0mkfcb said:
novatech":3t0mkfcb said:
The problem wouldn't be the rainfall but the fact that you cut first. You may get any newly germanated weeds but the weeds that have been cut have very little leaf as compared to root.
Why would it being cut have anything to do with him spraying summer weeds now
I have hayfields that I spray in the early spring and then cut for hay in late May and they have no weeds but then some of the summer weeds will pop up after the grass has been taken off

The weeds that I spray after cutting are an entirely different weed than what was their earlier in the yr

Total ignorance on my part. I thought weeds that came up in the spring continued to grow throughout the summer. I am not familiar with the Virginia growing season.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
11
Location
MO Ozarks
novatech":2emnsili said:
Angus Cowman":2emnsili said:
novatech":2emnsili said:
The problem wouldn't be the rainfall but the fact that you cut first. You may get any newly germanated weeds but the weeds that have been cut have very little leaf as compared to root.
Why would it being cut have anything to do with him spraying summer weeds now
I have hayfields that I spray in the early spring and then cut for hay in late May and they have no weeds but then some of the summer weeds will pop up after the grass has been taken off

The weeds that I spray after cutting are an entirely different weed than what was their earlier in the yr

Total ignorance on my part. I thought weeds that came up in the spring continued to grow throughout the summer. I am not familiar with the Virginia growing season.
There are a few weeds that grow all year long but most of them are seasonal. Fall into spring, spring into early summer, early summer into fall. And there are always a few early brds of each type and late bloomers too.
 
Top