1st horse

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msscamp

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buhbuh":1awqyrzo said:
What to look for in a first time horse?
pleasure ride, must be cattle friendly, ect...

The 3 most important things are good conformation, good feet, and a sound horse. If these are not there, nothing else will matter. Talk to local vets, boarding places, neighbors, friends, and anyone else you can think of, and ask them to recommend a good farrier. Then call that farrier and ask him/her what he/she would charge to look at the horse you select. They can tell you if the above 3 things are there. After that is confirmed, then you can determine if the horse is free of vices such as kicking, biting, pawing, cribbing, striking, hard to catch, head-shy, etc. If he/she passes those tests, the next step would be to determine how well-broke he/she is, how they move, whether they are solid or shy/spook at every little thing, smoothness of gait, willingness, attitude, friendly, etc. As this is your first horse, you will need help with this process. If you have a trusted friend or relative who can assist you with this - great. If not, go back to the people who recommended the farrier and ask about reputable trainers in the area, call them and see if they would be willing to help you. I know I'm leaving things out, but I cannot think of what they are. Sorry. :oops:
 

J

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In my opinion look for good feet first. Thats where a horse starts. Don't worry about the bloodlines my best horse ever, I bought out of the pasture next door when I was a kid. He was a baby sitter or he could get wound up and work his heart out if you asked him to. All the big names on paper don't make alot of difference to me but if its the right ones then I guess it doesn't hurt? Also try to get info about the person you are buying from. If you have never bought a horse before, those horse traders can be about as slick as a mechanic or car saleman.
Most of all don't get in a big hurry or buy the first one ya see be picky and get one that will be right for you because if you buy the wrong one it can be a pretty big headache.
 

Alan

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Do some research and see what breeds have the temperment you are looking for. Again I'll say do some research on what type of horse you want. Check out he post "need help selecting a horse breed" on this message board, may have your answer.

Alan
 

msscamp

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Alan":1jvyxv33 said:
Do some research and see what breeds have the temperment you are looking for. Again I'll say do some research on what type of horse you want. Check out he post "need help selecting a horse breed" on this message board, may have your answer.

Alan

There are exceptions to every rule, sometimes a lot of them. Just because a breed says it has certain temperament qualities doesn't make it so. Take each horse on its own merits and go from there.
 

Alan

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msscamp":1cl07n06 said:
Alan":1cl07n06 said:
Do some research and see what breeds have the temperment you are looking for. Again I'll say do some research on what type of horse you want. Check out he post "need help selecting a horse breed" on this message board, may have your answer.

Alan

There are exceptions to every rule, sometimes a lot of them. Just because a breed says it has certain temperament qualities doesn't make it so. Take each horse on its own merits and go from there.

I agree that every breed has it's exceptions to the rule, but you know as well as I do if you take 100 Arabs and 100 QH's that the majority of each group would have that breeds temperment (assuming the QH's are not appendix). But there are some exceptions to the rule. But to say lots may be a little to much.

I agree to take each horse on it's merits, but a lot of horses will not show their true colors until they have been in your barn for a couple of weeks. The horse may be gentle and well mannered until "the honeymoon" is over and is comfortable in it's new enviroment, then turn into something else. Many contracts have a return policy written in where you can return the horse after a few weeks (2 or 3) for a refund. Most of the time the purchaser will pay for a Vet check upon return. This is done with horses purchased for a couple of thousand dollars, would not be as cost effective to do it on a $500 horse.

JMO
Alan
 

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