Do your steers make the cut?

Backgrounding & feeding questions.
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Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Brookhill Angus » Mon Jan 28, 2019 3:06 pm

I've heard numerous times on this forum that CAB is a total joke. There is usually little to no facts to back up those statements. After watching this video below, I think they hold producer's feet to the fire, and that a lot of "black hided" cattle get shown the door, probably a lot of them are not purebred Angus. I found it interesting that most don't make it because of marbling. I also found it interesting that they said some producers want the feedlot to fix problems with their animals.

I would like to hear from those of you on the forum that have a "successful" relationship with CAB and how it's turned out for you. We sell bulls to people who routinely ask about alternatives to selling to the stockyards and having their clocked cleaned. I've told them to take a closer look at CAB.

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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Bigfoot » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:15 pm

I don’t have a “successful” relationship. Not sure how one would achieve a “successful” relationship. The only way to hit the mark is to reach the criteria. Sure, any meat that meets the criteria is going to be top quality. It’s going to be moist and juicy. The average person has no idea what they are talking about when they say that want a moist juicy steak. They are really saying give me a well marbeled steak. The “criteria” insures they get that. A choice plus carcass gives you the same thing without all the extra smoke and haze marketing.
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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Red Bull Breeder » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:28 pm

Not that hard to find out just find you a feedlot to take them and feed them. Retain ownership and get the data back. Just remember quality grade is one side Yield grade is the other. Might need at least enough to make a pot load.

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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Bigfoot » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:32 pm

I was in a little choke and puke restaurant one time. Might have been Shoney’s. Menu said we serve on select cuts of beef to our valued customers. Great marketing scheme, and definitely truth in the advertising. Under the fluff, what are they putting on the plate? About the lowest quality steak they can find. The angus association through marketing, claimed a spot high on the hog. Said it was theirs, and in the public’s total oblivious state of the packing industry jumped on the train. Toot toot.
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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Ebenezer » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:36 pm

I've heard numerous times on this forum that CAB is a total joke
Maybe from using the word Angus when the beef might not really be Angus. The Angus in the breed name is supposed to be pure. The Angus in the CAB is a marketing term. Folks get discouraged because the two do not match.

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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Bigfoot » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:48 pm

I just keep going for some reason........Any animal from almost any breed has the same opportunity to achieve the highly coveted certified Angus beef stamp. IMHO, it’s set the entire industry back, not forward. Producers chasing the stamp. Come on now. Chasing single trait selection, when the whole thing is sorted out after the animal is dead, and skint. The same producer could pursue a high choice, if they wanted to. Problem is, that wouldn’t pay now would it? Not to the cow calf man. Nothing to back up this statement, but my opinion. An Angus bull brings almost nothing to the party for a commercial cattleman. A straight Angus cow brings even less. Almost any logical cross you want to name, is going to bring more pounds to the weaning pen when fall comes. All these low birth weight angus bulls floating around the great commonwealth of Ky, might as well be low line bulls, for the size of calf they are producing at 8 months of age.
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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Bright Raven » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:57 pm

Bigfoot wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:48 pm
I just keep going for some reason........Any animal from almost any breed has the same opportunity to achieve the highly coveted certified Angus beef stamp. IMHO, it’s set the entire industry back, not forward. Producers chasing the stamp. Come on now. Chasing single trait selection, when the whole thing is sorted out after the animal is dead, and skint. The same producer could pursue a high choice, if they wanted to. Problem is, that wouldn’t pay now would it? Not to the cow calf man. Nothing to back up this statement, but my opinion. An Angus bull brings almost nothing to the party for a commercial cattleman. A straight Angus cow brings even less. Almost any logical cross you want to name, is going to bring more pounds to the weaning pen when fall comes. All these low birth weight angus bulls floating around the great commonwealth of Ky, might as well be low line bulls, for the size of calf they are producing at 8 months of age.
Set the industry back, maybe, I see your point. But it has promoted black hided cattle. Furthermore, it has been a cash cow (funny), for both the Angus Breed and the CAB brand which don't forget, are two entirely different enterprises. The CAB Brand is basically "rented" to beef packers. The packers don't give a cup of cold water what breed is in the package as long as it meets the CAB established criteria.
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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Bigfoot » Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:04 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:57 pm
Bigfoot wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:48 pm
I just keep going for some reason........Any animal from almost any breed has the same opportunity to achieve the highly coveted certified Angus beef stamp. IMHO, it’s set the entire industry back, not forward. Producers chasing the stamp. Come on now. Chasing single trait selection, when the whole thing is sorted out after the animal is dead, and skint. The same producer could pursue a high choice, if they wanted to. Problem is, that wouldn’t pay now would it? Not to the cow calf man. Nothing to back up this statement, but my opinion. An Angus bull brings almost nothing to the party for a commercial cattleman. A straight Angus cow brings even less. Almost any logical cross you want to name, is going to bring more pounds to the weaning pen when fall comes. All these low birth weight angus bulls floating around the great commonwealth of Ky, might as well be low line bulls, for the size of calf they are producing at 8 months of age.
Set the industry back, maybe, I see your point. But it has promoted black hided cattle. Furthermore, it has been a cash cow (funny), for both the Angus Breed and the CAB brand which don't forget, are two entirely different enterprises. The CAB Brand is basically "rented" to beef packers. The packers don't give a cup of cold water what breed is in the package as long as it meets the CAB established criteria.
I honestly do think it set the industry back. Especially in our area. Cattle are commingled, and graded. The 2 blacks bring what the 1 offs bring. You can bring a lower quality calf to the yard, and leave with same check. That can’t be good all the way down the chain.
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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by True Grit Farms » Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:33 pm

To large of ribeye area culls 11%, and cattle over1050 make up another 9% of the culls so that leaves 72% that get culled because of the lack of marbling. So that my friends is why the majority of the CAB beef is produced from moderate size Angus cows.
If we'd of know this we'd of picked our own cotton.

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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Ky hills » Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:46 pm

Can't say anything about marketing to CAB, though we do use Angus Bulls some. I figure some of our graded CPH sale calves may eventually be marketed by somebody down the line to CAB.
We do sell Hereford and BWF calves in sale that supposedly qualifies for CHB. In a regular sale our Hereford feeders would get docked significantly but in those Hereford influence sales they usually sell right with or above the highest sellers for that day of the regular sale.
As for what I think of the CAB product, it's been inconsistent in my experience, but I do like the quality of the ground beef. If we didn't have our own beef, CAB would be what I would prefer as an alternative, it's USA origin.

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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Brookhill Angus » Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:46 pm

Bigfoot wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:15 pm
I don’t have a “successful” relationship. Not sure how one would achieve a “successful” relationship. The only way to hit the mark is to reach the criteria. Sure, any meat that meets the criteria is going to be top quality. It’s going to be moist and juicy. The average person has no idea what they are talking about when they say that want a moist juicy steak. They are really saying give me a well marbeled steak. The “criteria” insures they get that. A choice plus carcass gives you the same thing without all the extra smoke and haze marketing.
Let me word things differently. Has anyone developed steers that meet the standards of CAB? Worked with CAB, and sold to CAB on an ongoing basis?
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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by Brookhill Angus » Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:04 pm

Bigfoot wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:48 pm
I just keep going for some reason........Any animal from almost any breed has the same opportunity to achieve the highly coveted certified Angus beef stamp. IMHO, it’s set the entire industry back, not forward. Producers chasing the stamp. Come on now. Chasing single trait selection, when the whole thing is sorted out after the animal is dead, and skint. The same producer could pursue a high choice, if they wanted to. Problem is, that wouldn’t pay now would it? Not to the cow calf man. Nothing to back up this statement, but my opinion. An Angus bull brings almost nothing to the party for a commercial cattleman. A straight Angus cow brings even less. Almost any logical cross you want to name, is going to bring more pounds to the weaning pen when fall comes. All these low birth weight angus bulls floating around the great commonwealth of Ky, might as well be low line bulls, for the size of calf they are producing at 8 months of age.
I had a prime Angus recently at a restaurant in Lexington, KY. It was from Creekstone. I can tell you that it was way above average in taste compared to some shoe leather I've had at lower priced restaurants.

I wonder what you would say about Shorthorns, do they produce horrible beef as well? What about Hereford, overhyped? I feel that you think that the only reason, and the absolute only reason, Angus is where it is today is hype.

As for low birthweight, calving ease bulls. I agree with you. I have no use for small framed bulls. Our average birthweight is in the 80-100 range, which scares off most people. We have available bulls for you that were over 100 pounds at birth and are terminal CED. They won't be delivering puny cattle, unless one's cows aren't up to snuff.

What breed combinations would produce superior marbling? Excluding Wagyu. Would you approve of purebred Angus crossed with purebred Shorthorn?
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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by plumber_greg » Tue Jan 29, 2019 6:40 am

Brookhill Angus wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:46 pm
Bigfoot wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:15 pm
I don’t have a “successful” relationship. Not sure how one would achieve a “successful” relationship. The only way to hit the mark is to reach the criteria. Sure, any meat that meets the criteria is going to be top quality. It’s going to be moist and juicy. The average person has no idea what they are talking about when they say that want a moist juicy steak. They are really saying give me a well marbeled steak. The “criteria” insures they get that. A choice plus carcass gives you the same thing without all the extra smoke and haze marketing.
Let me word things differently. Has anyone developed steers that meet the standards of CAB? Worked with CAB, and sold to CAB on an ongoing basis?
I've sent calves my calves to the feedlot, one pen once had 29% CAB. So ,yes I have met the standards.
I'm confused, how do you think someone "sells to CAB"?
How do you "work with CAB"?
How so you "sell to CAB on an ongoing basis"?
I think you need to find out what CAB is and retain ownership of some calves. Then talk about how easy it is to develop the right kind of cattle.
JMHO. GS
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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by mwj » Tue Jan 29, 2019 7:14 am

The good thing about CAB is the grading standards not the hide color. We never raise ALL good cattle even though we try our best. A lot of people would be very surprised if all there cattle were sold on the ''rail''.

The program gives the consumer a chance at buying a decent cut of beef on a regular basis, which is a good thing. Our end users as a whole do not have the skill to visually identify that choice steak we are proud of producing. At the price in the meat counter they will not come back for numerous poor guesses.

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Re: Do your steers make the cut?

Post by TCRanch » Tue Jan 29, 2019 7:27 am

Brookhill Angus wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:04 pm
Bigfoot wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:48 pm
I just keep going for some reason........Any animal from almost any breed has the same opportunity to achieve the highly coveted certified Angus beef stamp. IMHO, it’s set the entire industry back, not forward. Producers chasing the stamp. Come on now. Chasing single trait selection, when the whole thing is sorted out after the animal is dead, and skint. The same producer could pursue a high choice, if they wanted to. Problem is, that wouldn’t pay now would it? Not to the cow calf man. Nothing to back up this statement, but my opinion. An Angus bull brings almost nothing to the party for a commercial cattleman. A straight Angus cow brings even less. Almost any logical cross you want to name, is going to bring more pounds to the weaning pen when fall comes. All these low birth weight angus bulls floating around the great commonwealth of Ky, might as well be low line bulls, for the size of calf they are producing at 8 months of age.
I had a prime Angus recently at a restaurant in Lexington, KY. It was from Creekstone. I can tell you that it was way above average in taste compared to some shoe leather I've had at lower priced restaurants.

I wonder what you would say about Shorthorns, do they produce horrible beef as well? What about Hereford, overhyped? I feel that you think that the only reason, and the absolute only reason, Angus is where it is today is hype.

As for low birthweight, calving ease bulls. I agree with you. I have no use for small framed bulls. Our average birthweight is in the 80-100 range, which scares off most people. We have available bulls for you that were over 100 pounds at birth and are terminal CED. They won't be delivering puny cattle, unless one's cows aren't up to snuff.

What breed combinations would produce superior marbling? Excluding Wagyu. Would you approve of purebred Angus crossed with purebred Shorthorn?
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