Yeast cultures and the benefits

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Brookhill Angus
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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Brookhill Angus » Mon Jul 15, 2019 9:27 pm

TexasBred wrote:
Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:30 pm

I can put you in touch with some buyers that don’t do anything we do, and they have had plenty of success with our bulls. It would be safe to say they run them pretty hard. Just saying....
Wow this just blows me away. It just does not register with you at all. You are the vendors delight. :clap: :clap:
You should see my cattle, that’s what would really blow you away.


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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Lucky_P » Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:12 am

Some years ago, a prominent animal scientist opined in one of the trade magazines, that "If you're getting a 95+% calf crop...you're probably spending too much money on feed."
I think there's more than a nugget of truth in that.

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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Jeanne - Simme Valley » Tue Jul 16, 2019 8:24 am

In a commercial operation, that MAY be a valid statement. But, in a PB operation that has quality cattle and gets high end premium for their offspring, they may not hold true.
Granted, I personally don't feed grain to my cows. Yes, I feed my replacement heifers from weaning to breeding - not much, 5# WSC per hd/day - but I believe growing out your heifers for breeding is essential for avoiding calving problems.
But, when it comes to health program, mineral nutrition, grass/hay nutrition - I don't hold back. With 100% AI, cows must be in good physical and health condition. But, I don't get 100% (probably not 95%) bred during my season.
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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Bright Raven » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:11 am

Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 8:24 am
In a commercial operation, that MAY be a valid statement. But, in a PB operation that has quality cattle and gets high end premium for their offspring, they may not hold true.
Granted, I personally don't feed grain to my cows. Yes, I feed my replacement heifers from weaning to breeding - not much, 5# WSC per hd/day - but I believe growing out your heifers for breeding is essential for avoiding calving problems.
But, when it comes to health program, mineral nutrition, grass/hay nutrition - I don't hold back. With 100% AI, cows must be in good physical and health condition. But, I don't get 100% (probably not 95%) bred during my season.
First: There is certainly no sense in over supplementing commercial or breeding stock cattle. Good animal husbandry would call for a frugal approach.

But I too find that breeding stock producers are held to certain expectations. Whether the buyer is shopping for replacement heifers or young bulls, they expect healthy, good physical specimens. That doesn't mean you need to "pour the feed to them". In fact, my buyers want the bulls to be heavy muscled, big boned and thrifty. Not wallowing in fat. Something that I think helps my young bulls - they develop in a steep large pasture where they can wander around and get exercise. They have excellent forage, good water, shade, and mineral. I have 7 in a 30 acre pasture right now. They are very fit looking.
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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:19 am

Bright Raven wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:11 am
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 8:24 am
In a commercial operation, that MAY be a valid statement. But, in a PB operation that has quality cattle and gets high end premium for their offspring, they may not hold true.
Granted, I personally don't feed grain to my cows. Yes, I feed my replacement heifers from weaning to breeding - not much, 5# WSC per hd/day - but I believe growing out your heifers for breeding is essential for avoiding calving problems.
But, when it comes to health program, mineral nutrition, grass/hay nutrition - I don't hold back. With 100% AI, cows must be in good physical and health condition. But, I don't get 100% (probably not 95%) bred during my season.
First: There is certainly no sense in over supplementing commercial or breeding stock cattle. Good animal husbandry would call for a frugal approach.

But I too find that breeding stock producers are held to certain expectations. Whether the buyer is shopping for replacement heifers or young bulls, they expect healthy, good physical specimens. That doesn't mean you need to "pour the feed to them". In fact, my buyers want the bulls to be heavy muscled, big boned and thrifty. Not wallowing in fat. Something that I think helps my young bulls - they develop in a steep large pasture where they can wander around and get exercise. They have excellent forage, good water, shade, and mineral. I have 7 in a 30 acre pasture right now. They are very fit looking.
By your standards I too am very "fit looking". Now if you would just sell my wife and doctor on that notion I'd be all set.
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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Bright Raven » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:07 am

TennesseeTuxedo wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:19 am
Bright Raven wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:11 am
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 8:24 am
In a commercial operation, that MAY be a valid statement. But, in a PB operation that has quality cattle and gets high end premium for their offspring, they may not hold true.
Granted, I personally don't feed grain to my cows. Yes, I feed my replacement heifers from weaning to breeding - not much, 5# WSC per hd/day - but I believe growing out your heifers for breeding is essential for avoiding calving problems.
But, when it comes to health program, mineral nutrition, grass/hay nutrition - I don't hold back. With 100% AI, cows must be in good physical and health condition. But, I don't get 100% (probably not 95%) bred during my season.
First: There is certainly no sense in over supplementing commercial or breeding stock cattle. Good animal husbandry would call for a frugal approach.

But I too find that breeding stock producers are held to certain expectations. Whether the buyer is shopping for replacement heifers or young bulls, they expect healthy, good physical specimens. That doesn't mean you need to "pour the feed to them". In fact, my buyers want the bulls to be heavy muscled, big boned and thrifty. Not wallowing in fat. Something that I think helps my young bulls - they develop in a steep large pasture where they can wander around and get exercise. They have excellent forage, good water, shade, and mineral. I have 7 in a 30 acre pasture right now. They are very fit looking.
By your standards I too am very "fit looking". Now if you would just sell my wife and doctor on that notion I'd be all set.
Just stop eating those marbled Angus rib steaks.
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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Brookhill Angus » Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:16 am

Lucky_P wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:12 am
Some years ago, a prominent animal scientist opined in one of the trade magazines, that "If you're getting a 95+% calf crop...you're probably spending too much money on feed."
I think there's more than a nugget of truth in that.
Penny wise, pound foolish.

Feed is cheap when you consider what I’m producing.

25-30 SAV America 8018 sons pay for a LOT of feed.
"When someone tells you it can't be done, it's more a reflection of their limitations, not yours"

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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by sim.-ang.king » Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:23 am

Brookhill Angus wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:16 am
Lucky_P wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:12 am
Some years ago, a prominent animal scientist opined in one of the trade magazines, that "If you're getting a 95+% calf crop...you're probably spending too much money on feed."
I think there's more than a nugget of truth in that.
Penny wise, pound foolish.

Feed is cheap when you consider what I’m producing.

25-30 SAV America 8018 sons pay for a LOT of feed.
Supplementing energy to cows on green grass to maintain fertility sounds more like a breeding problem rather than a feeding problem.
Why should I apologize for becoming a monster?
Did anyone apologize for making me one?

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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Brookhill Angus » Tue Jul 16, 2019 12:23 pm

sim.-ang.king wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:23 am
Brookhill Angus wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:16 am
Lucky_P wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:12 am
Some years ago, a prominent animal scientist opined in one of the trade magazines, that "If you're getting a 95+% calf crop...you're probably spending too much money on feed."
I think there's more than a nugget of truth in that.
Penny wise, pound foolish.

Feed is cheap when you consider what I’m producing.

25-30 SAV America 8018 sons pay for a LOT of feed.
Supplementing energy to cows on green grass to maintain fertility sounds more like a breeding problem rather than a feeding problem.
I'm not "maintaining", I'm "enhancing". Like I said before, there are lots of things you don't "need".

I sincerely think most cattle can survive with nothing, No minerals, no vaccines, no fly control, dirty water, poor pasture, moldy hay, and the list goes on, yes they can survive. I've seen it around me. But why?

I'm sure hospitals see babies born every day into situations that are less than desirable, putting it lightly, does that make it ok? Does that assure the baby has the right start? Yes they were born, but how will they develop?

Trust me, it would be far easier to never attend to my herd and take it easy.
"When someone tells you it can't be done, it's more a reflection of their limitations, not yours"

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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Bright Raven » Tue Jul 16, 2019 1:53 pm

Brookhill

There is good advice being directed your way. I see some that is intended to antagonize you, but most of it has merit.

I share some of the philosophy others are expressing. In modern beef herds like yours, mine, Fire Sweeps, Simmi Valley, etc. that place a heavy burden on a cow. We expect them to calve every 365 days, breed back in 60 days, raise big healthy calves, etc. It takes inputs to do that. Especially when using AI and ET. It is essential to provide good forage, high quality mineral, adequate water, supplements during stress or when poor quality hay is being fed but when that threshold is reached to go over and above that is like a person who over eats and does not have a healthy lifestyle. IMO your posts give the impression that your feeding practices are careless and not measured. I sometimes read your posts and visualize you backing up to feed bunkers with a dump truck of feed. The bunkers are full and running over. Cows are wading knee deep in some exotic feed just to get to the edge of the bunker. Based on my visit, I don't think that is what you are doing. But comments like "if a little yeast is good, a lot of yeast is better" are not making you look like a good steward. Infact, that statement is not true. Nutrition is a science.

Let me leave you with this thought. Don't create unhealthy cows by giving them too much of what they don't need.
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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Brookhill Angus » Tue Jul 16, 2019 2:18 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 1:53 pm
Brookhill

There is good advice being directed your way. I see some that is intended to antagonize you, but most of it has merit.

I share some of the philosophy others are expressing. In modern beef herds like yours, mine, Fire Sweeps, Simmi Valley, etc. that place a heavy burden on a cow. We expect them to calve every 365 days, breed back in 60 days, raise big healthy calves, etc. It takes inputs to do that. Especially when using AI and ET. It is essential to provide good forage, high quality mineral, adequate water, supplements during stress or when poor quality hay is being fed but when that threshold is reached to go over and above that is like a person who over eats and does not have a healthy lifestyle. IMO your posts give the impression that your feeding practices are careless and not measured. I sometimes read your posts and visualize you backing up to feed bunkers with a dump truck of feed. The bunkers are full and running over. Cows are wading knee deep in some exotic feed just to get to the edge of the bunker. Based on my visit, I don't think that is what you are doing. But comments like "if a little yeast is good, a lot of yeast is better" are not making you look like a good steward. Infact, that statement is not true. Nutrition is a science.

Let me leave you with this thought. Don't create unhealthy cows by giving them too much of what they don't need.
You are correct Ron, they truly don't understand what I'm doing. I actually prefer that they consider me a novice.

Now if you will excuse me, I have a tractor-trailer load of grain arriving shortly and I must go meet them. LMAO!
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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Brookhill Angus » Tue Jul 16, 2019 2:29 pm

I actually stay up a night dreaming about this setup for my mommas

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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by sim.-ang.king » Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:16 pm

Brookhill Angus wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 12:23 pm
sim.-ang.king wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:23 am
Brookhill Angus wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:16 am


Penny wise, pound foolish.

Feed is cheap when you consider what I’m producing.

25-30 SAV America 8018 sons pay for a LOT of feed.
Supplementing energy to cows on green grass to maintain fertility sounds more like a breeding problem rather than a feeding problem.
I'm not "maintaining", I'm "enhancing". Like I said before, there are lots of things you don't "need".

I sincerely think most cattle can survive with nothing, No minerals, no vaccines, no fly control, dirty water, poor pasture, moldy hay, and the list goes on, yes they can survive. I've seen it around me. But why?

I'm sure hospitals see babies born every day into situations that are less than desirable, putting it lightly, does that make it ok? Does that assure the baby has the right start? Yes they were born, but how will they develop?

Trust me, it would be far easier to never attend to my herd and take it easy.
What does a baby being born in a hospital have to do with fertility?

Why always go to the extreme? There are cattle that calve within 365 days every time, and do it on low imputs. Those cattle we're bred to do that, either intenationly, or unintonationly. You might not think that is the "best" way of doing it, but many could argue neither is what you are doing.

Still have to question why your cows "need" such high inputs. Is your pasture not enough? I would think the way grass is growing this year, they would be just fine on grass and mineral.
You might want to go talk your friend Ron about grazing breeding stock.
Why should I apologize for becoming a monster?
Did anyone apologize for making me one?

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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Ebenezer » Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:36 pm

So, is there a difference in fed in fertility and bred in fertility? I think so. Which do you want and which do you sell? I know which one is cheapest to keep on the farm and which one real commercial cattlemen want. What is the purpose of the #2 option?

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Re: Yeast cultures and the benefits

Post by Brookhill Angus » Tue Jul 16, 2019 7:23 pm

Ebenezer wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:36 pm
So, is there a difference in fed in fertility and bred in fertility? I think so. Which do you want and which do you sell? I know which one is cheapest to keep on the farm and which one real commercial cattlemen want. What is the purpose of the #2 option?
The word “cheap” is never used on my operation, it’s forbidden. Cheap denotes lack of quality.

The fact that you are focused on the “cheapest” route is quite telling.
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