Hay heating

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Farmer13
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Hay heating

Post by Farmer13 » Thu Jun 27, 2019 8:21 am

Recently had some grass hay made. Just out of curiosity I stuck a compost thermometer into a few bales. Some were at 120. A couple were at 140. How hot is too hot? The hay laid for a couple days but baling and seemed dry.



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Re: Hay heating

Post by Silver » Thu Jun 27, 2019 10:13 am

https://uknowledge.uky.edu/cgi/viewcont ... ky_alfalfa

A moisture probe is a valuable / indispensable tool.

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Re: Hay heating

Post by gcreekrch » Thu Jun 27, 2019 2:39 pm

Better to bale two days too dry that an hour too wet
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Re: Hay heating

Post by Brookhill Angus » Thu Jun 27, 2019 4:21 pm

Farmer13 wrote:
Thu Jun 27, 2019 8:21 am
Recently had some grass hay made. Just out of curiosity I stuck a compost thermometer into a few bales. Some were at 120. A couple were at 140. How hot is too hot? The hay laid for a couple days but baling and seemed dry.
For me personally, if I start to smell that caramelization smell coming forth and if I see smoke rising, I know I have screwed up royally. I had about 20 bales two years ago that did that after I baled up some really thick clover. I let it dry to for two days in high heat, but it still didn't dry down enough, and that's after using a conditioner to cut it. The hay was a complete loss to me, but an Amish guy came and bought it all for $10 a roll and said he would grind it up and feed it to milk cows. He was unfazed by the condition of it, but I didn't want to feed it out to my gals. I'm sure a tedder would have fixed that problem, but I didn't have one available at that point in time.
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Re: Hay heating

Post by ALACOWMAN » Thu Jun 27, 2019 6:22 pm

You can have high heat a couple days but if it's humid like here.and there's moisture in the ground its like a sauna and keep pulling the moisture up in it.a Tedder is a must here at times..though I hate it...
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Re: Hay heating

Post by snoopdog » Thu Jun 27, 2019 7:04 pm

I just read an article on this and I think 140 is tops, its normal if it starts back down. As mentioned ground moisture and humidity play a part.
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Re: Hay heating

Post by sstterry » Fri Jun 28, 2019 4:16 am

Critical temperatures:

125 F — No action needed
150 F — Hay is entering the danger zone. Check temperature twice daily and disassemble stacked hay bales to promote air circulation to cool the hay.
160 F — Hay has reached danger zone. Check temperature every couple hours and disassemble stacked hay.
175 F — Hot spots or fire pockets are likely. Alert fire services; stop all air movement around hay.
190 F — With fire service assistance, remove hot hay. Be aware that hay could burst into flames.
200 F or higher — With fire service assistance, remove hot hay. Most likely a fire will occur; Be aware that hay could burst into flames.

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