Big Momma Cows

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of your favorite breed.
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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Silver » Mon Jan 14, 2019 5:17 pm

ALACOWMAN wrote:
Silver wrote:
lithuanian farmer wrote:Have been waching two Simmental farms on facebook for some time. They sometimes post their weaning weighs, yearling weights, mature weights, etc. Very strong traditional Simmental, cows being around 2000lbs. But they have very good weaning weights too. From what they've posted heifers at ~7months age are around 900lbs, seen one posted at 7.5months weighing 1001lbs. Bulls at 7months are ~1000-1100lbs, seen at one farm 9 months olds being +-1400lbs. The most recent record on one farm is 120days age 634lbs bull calf.

One my friend raises Angus. Just recently posted his 120days weighing results. The highest DWG was 3.5264lbs, average 3.146lbs for bulls, average for heifers 2.618lbs. He doesn't creep feed calves. His cows are +-1500-1600lbs, some maybe abit smaller.


It's amazing what good cattle on good forage can do. My dream is to be able to keep my cattle on good tame pasture from calving to weaning. I'd even just like to try it with a small trial group if I had a place to do it.
One place I buy bulls from doesn't creep feed, runs on good tame pasture with the pairs that are raising the bulls, and produces weaning weights at least as good as what you report there.
It's good to have cattle that can do well under tougher conditions, but it's also nice to know what they are capable of under ideal conditions.
I guess my response wasn't directly related to "big momma cows". Sorry :lol2:

What does tame pasture imply, never heard that term..are is it self explanatory?? Might be I got one and didn't know it.. :cboy:


Tame pasture in these parts indicate that it's forage that's been planted. My pairs run on mostly (but not totally) bush ground and eat wild grass and poplar leaves.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by JMJ Farms » Mon Jan 14, 2019 9:52 pm

boondocks wrote:
Silver wrote:
Ky hills wrote:
Gets my respect too.
Now if there was a monetary prize to go along with the medal I'd be applying I'm feeding with a cabless, 2wd Case IH C70.


Okay, seeing as there is a medal on the line.... I used to feed with an open station JD 4020. Cows a mile North from the house. Even at -60F. Into the North wind. PM me for my address for sending the medal.


Silver, we feed in the cold with an open cab too. We have to keep the block heater plugged in to the tractor for a few hours beforehand once it gets supercold (we spend a lot of the winter with real temps around zero or less, and wind chills 20 or 30 below, so not quite as cold as you but gettin there). We are fiddling with installing a device that will let us turn on the power to the heater from the other side of the farm. Will be great if it works.


I assume you your heater is plugged into a 120v outlet through an extension cord? If so you could buy a timer that goes between the outlet and the extension cord. They sell cheap ones for $15-$20 bucks. Lots of folks use them for outside Christmas lights. Or, if that won’t handle it, you could buy a water heater timer. Simply wire a plug in to plug into the receptacle on the LINE side and wire your extension cord in on the LOAD side. Will be inexpensive, easy to program, and will definitely handle the current.
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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by boondocks » Wed Jan 16, 2019 11:35 pm

JMJ Farms wrote:
boondocks wrote:
Silver wrote:
Okay, seeing as there is a medal on the line.... I used to feed with an open station JD 4020. Cows a mile North from the house. Even at -60F. Into the North wind. PM me for my address for sending the medal.


Silver, we feed in the cold with an open cab too. We have to keep the block heater plugged in to the tractor for a few hours beforehand once it gets supercold (we spend a lot of the winter with real temps around zero or less, and wind chills 20 or 30 below, so not quite as cold as you but gettin there). We are fiddling with installing a device that will let us turn on the power to the heater from the other side of the farm. Will be great if it works.


I assume you your heater is plugged into a 120v outlet through an extension cord? If so you could buy a timer that goes between the outlet and the extension cord. They sell cheap ones for $15-$20 bucks. Lots of folks use them for outside Christmas lights. Or, if that won’t handle it, you could buy a water heater timer. Simply wire a plug in to plug into the receptacle on the LINE side and wire your extension cord in on the LOAD side. Will be inexpensive, easy to program, and will definitely handle the current.

Thanks, JMJ, will pass this along to my tech crew. ;)

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by gcreekrch » Thu Jan 17, 2019 10:58 pm

It’s not how big they get that really counts, it’s how quick they get big that makes the money.

Having said that, a 1400 lb cow is huge in our immediate area, soft feed doesn’t make for big cattle here.
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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Brookhill Angus » Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:41 pm

I haven't seen big weaning weights from small cows, maybe it happens, I just haven't seen them personally. Adjusted 205 matters to me along with RADG. Now, since everyone thinks that big cattle only come from grain, let me dispel that misconception.

Here is a pair that we purchased from Stone Gate in Flemingsburg, KY. If you go to their website, they have been a seedstock producer since 1952 and they run an all grass/hay operation on their cows/calves. The cow pictured below and her heifer were both "grass only", no grain whatsoever. (She definitely gets grain now, so does the daughter which is now a cow). Grass only folks, and she weighed 1780 right off the trailer. Big cow! She has given us several very nice calves, and is now settled by Connealy Capitalist (expecting big things from that combo).

She is from the Eurotia cow family, and Basin Rainmaker. The daughter is from an Apex Windbreak 622. BTW, her daughter is a big momma as well.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by ddd75 » Fri Jan 18, 2019 6:48 am

i have a couple SAV cows and they are the same size as most of my other angus. I'd say they are right at around 1100 lbs my baldies are bigger.. herefords are the biggest I have. probbably 1600 - 1700 lbs.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Ebenezer » Fri Jan 18, 2019 6:56 am

I've had huge cows on grass only. It was a genetic issue and I quit using those genetics and sold those cows. It proved nothing to me except a big cow eats more than an average sized cow that most commercial producers want.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Silver » Fri Jan 18, 2019 8:35 am

Seems to me cow size is often a function of environment / geography.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Dave » Fri Jan 18, 2019 8:49 am

Silver wrote:Seems to me cow size is often a function of environment / geography.


You just don't see those big 1,600-1,700 pound cows here. I am certain they don't work too well in this steep, high desert country. It takes more grass to maintain a big cow and when it is a couple steps to the next mouthfull...... well a big cow would be on a diet plan. This time of the year with the cows all down out of the hills there is about 2,000 momma cows in the 5 miles between my house and the post office. And like I said there just isn't any of those big cows.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Silver » Fri Jan 18, 2019 8:59 am

Dave wrote:
Silver wrote:Seems to me cow size is often a function of environment / geography.


You just don't see those big 1,600-1,700 pound cows here. I am certain they don't work too well in this steep, high desert country. It takes more grass to maintain a big cow and when it is a couple steps to the next mouthfull...... well a big cow would be on a diet plan. This time of the year with the cows all down out of the hills there is about 2,000 momma cows in the 5 miles between my house and the post office. And like I said there just isn't any of those big cows.


And I bet your cows locally are larger than the ones eking out a living in the Utah desert.
I think the trick is to find a cow that works in our environment and produces well year after year. When we do that size becomes a secondary concern, because if we do that form eventually fits function.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by gcreekrch » Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:05 am

Brookhill Angus wrote:I haven't seen big weaning weights from small cows, maybe it happens, I just haven't seen them personally. Adjusted 205 matters to me along with RADG. Now, since everyone thinks that big cattle only come from grain, let me dispel that misconception.

Here is a pair that we purchased from Stone Gate in Flemingsburg, KY. If you go to their website, they have been a seedstock producer since 1952 and they run an all grass/hay operation on their cows/calves. The cow pictured below and her heifer were both "grass only", no grain whatsoever. (She definitely gets grain now, so does the daughter which is now a cow). Grass only folks, and she weighed 1780 right off the trailer. Big cow! She has given us several very nice calves, and is now settled by Connealy Capitalist (expecting big things from that combo).

She is from the Eurotia cow family, and Basin Rainmaker. The daughter is from an Apex Windbreak 622. BTW, her daughter is a big momma as well.

Image


Weaning weights mean nothing if it cost to much to produce them. It is how many dollars are left after expenses that pay bills here. My little 480 lb calves leave a pretty fair profit every year.
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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by True Grit Farms » Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:32 am

You guys are talking about cattle that work for you and your environment. Some folks like cattle that you have to work for. But there's no denying they look good in the front pasture by the road belly deep in green.
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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Brookhill Angus » Fri Jan 18, 2019 1:13 pm

True Grit Farms wrote:You guys are talking about cattle that work for you and your environment. Some folks like cattle that you have to work for. But there's no denying they look good in the front pasture by the road belly deep in green.


Mine are belly deep in mud AND in the front pasture. In fact the front 50 acres of my farm looks like a WW2 battlefield, thanks to our lovely weather. Our frontage fence is rusted woven wire, put in during 1970’s, everything else is poly wire. Our “front barn” is a complete pile of crap, paint peeling, roof rusted, out front gates are rusted, mounted on rotting wood.

Just wanted to paint an accurate picture of how our operation looks. The cattle however look very good.

We will be going to to near zero this weekend, I have wondered how some of the cattle that have been neglected in our area will make it through without food. I doubt their owners will be suffering in the same way.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Brookhill Angus » Fri Jan 18, 2019 1:32 pm

Ebenezer wrote:I've had huge cows on grass only. It was a genetic issue and I quit using those genetics and sold those cows. It proved nothing to me except a big cow eats more than an average sized cow that most commercial producers want.


Stone Gate has 450 registered cows, they all pretty much look like then photo I posted, they all eat grass and hay. They probably have another 400-500 commercial cows as well. For some reason their business model has worked for 67 years. Their clients seem to like their cows and their cows are big overall. They also have high DMI and $EN EPD’s.

If the commercial producer does not appreciate size in their cattle, then why are they constantly searching outcross combinations to increase frame. Around here everyone is crazy about Gelbvieh, they say “I can’t get any size out of Angus”, which is a myth, look at SAV.

As a commercial producer if you are actively seeking lower weaning weights and RADG you may want to reevaluate your business plan.

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Re: Big Momma Cows

Post by Ky hills » Fri Jan 18, 2019 1:37 pm

Brookhill Angus wrote:
True Grit Farms wrote:You guys are talking about cattle that work for you and your environment. Some folks like cattle that you have to work for. But there's no denying they look good in the front pasture by the road belly deep in green.


Mine are belly deep in mud AND in the front pasture. In fact the front 50 acres of my farm looks like a WW2 battlefield, thanks to our lovely weather. Our frontage fence is rusted woven wire, put in during 1970’s, everything else is poly wire. Our “front barn” is a complete pile of crap, paint peeling, roof rusted, out front gates are rusted, mounted on rotting wood.

Just wanted to paint an accurate picture of how our operation looks. The cattle however look very good.

We will be going to to near zero this weekend, I have wondered how some of the cattle that have been neglected in our area will make it through without food. I doubt their owners will be suffering in the same way.


Mud here too, pastures and everything else looks pretty rough too. I have been getting out some feed to the weaned calves and most days to the bred heifers, the field of mature cows that are calving now are getting feed mostly every other day but been two days since they have had grain. Since my mother has been in the hospital they are all darn lucky to get a roll a day of low quality hay, which this morning I put out at 2 am. I try hard to provide for our cattle especially in winter. Bothers me to see fields of skin and bones cattle, I see some cattle around that I don't know how they survive but evidently some do. An old friend used to have a saying "February shakes them and March takes them".

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