Page 3 of 10

Re: New calving season

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 1:08 pm
by lithuanian farmer
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Sat Jan 26, 2019 12:33 pm
That is a good example of why you don't want to totally trust EPD's on virgin bulls.
Yes, that's why have used him only on those cows, which have proven themselves with calving, or I believed that they should be able to handle bigger calves. After 100-110lbs calves from Limousine bulls, I don't expect any smaller from a Charolais.
Had to assist the last cow abit. She hasn't made any progress for around 30 min after I saw the feet of the calf. Decided that it'll be better for everyone to give her a hand. The size of the feet was a sign that it shouldn't be any smaller calf than the last one. Cow had 5 calves before, most around 110lbs, never had to help.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 2:19 am
by lithuanian farmer
As expected you need one cow to calve that others decided to do the same.
Have a heifer born today. Sired by BB, born at 282days, 116.8lbs. Calved easily.
Image
Image
Image

It's getting very interesting what average bw will be for this season... At the moment with 4 weighed calves (out of 5) it's 114lbs.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 12:26 pm
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
Do you have them calve outside, then bring them into the barn?

Re: New calving season

Posted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 1:52 pm
by lithuanian farmer
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Sun Jan 27, 2019 12:26 pm
Do you have them calve outside, then bring them into the barn?
If we see the cow in labor we bring her inside the shed. If she calves unnoticed we bring her in with the calf. Will let out when the calf will be around two weeks old. The cows can go inside that shed and it's next to the feeding area, so it's just a couple minutes work to move one in.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:45 am
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
I calve all inside in individual pens. They only go in at night when they "look" ready, then out during the daylight. When they calve, they get to stay in for 24-48 hours, depending on the weather & the need for pens for the next one to calve.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:20 am
by lithuanian farmer
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:45 am
I calve all inside in individual pens. They only go in at night when they "look" ready, then out during the daylight. When they calve, they get to stay in for 24-48 hours, depending on the weather & the need for pens for the next one to calve.
We calve them in individual pens too. Later join a couple in a bigger pen. It's a bit pf an extra work to keep them separate for two weeks, but it's worth it. At least for us. Last year we kept all cows in until March when weather was warm and nice. I want first to make sure that calves are nursing well, are strong and are smart enough to choose a warm place to sleep instead of a cold ground. At the moment it's pretty cold and a strong wind makes it even colder. Saw the latest heifer shivering, even if she's in the shed. Have put a heavy bedding of hay for all. Her tips of ears were frozen abit too. The piedx heifer is fully ready to be let out, but probably will wait a couple more days until the weather gets warmer.
When calves will be out, they'll have a separate pen in the shed, where they'll be able to be away from moms and always have a nice warm place heavily bedded.
This year we've a pretty big problem. Wolves... No seen for decades, but now saw some tracks near our pastures. That's one of the reasons why will wait for calves to be abit bigger to be let out.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 2:41 am
by lithuanian farmer
No more calves yet... But one girl is on 294th day today... Ready to pop any time now. Incalf with piedmontese and I'm pretty sure it's going to be a bull.
Image

Photos of elder calves. Two- coloured calf is two weeks old today, dark calf is abit over two weeks.
Image
Image
Image
Image

Re: New calving season

Posted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 7:14 am
by lithuanian farmer
Well, the girl decided to calve pretty quickly! Has a bull calf, as expected. 118.8lbs.
Image

Re: New calving season

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:03 am
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
2 week old calves look great. I had a big one yesterday, 128#, steer!

Re: New calving season

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 11:53 am
by lithuanian farmer
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:03 am
2 week old calves look great. I had a big one yesterday, 128#, steer!
Hope everything went well for you! That's a big calf, for sure.
I really like the dark heifer so far. Would love to have more like her. Very friendly character and is looking really well.
Will have one more calf soon. Cow is due on the 7th of February (285days), AI'd with blonde bull, which has 112.4lbs bw, so don't think it'll be any smaller calf. It's really interesting how all calves except charolais, don't look that heavy despite what the scales showed. Going to search for a twin once will have a calf under 90lbs!
I believe that those people, who don't weigh their newborn calves are mistaken that their calves are that small. Both farmers we bought our last two bulls from said that they don't have big calves, but when I saw their calves they looked pretty decent size. Not to mention that most calves from the previous bull were pretty much around 100lbs, some going up to 110lbs.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:13 pm
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
You are correct. Most don't really have a clue what their calves weigh. You have to put them on a scale.
No problem with big calf. Cow spit it out in very short time.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:20 pm
by Bright Raven
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:03 am
2 week old calves look great. I had a big one yesterday, 128#, steer!
That beats my 123 pound Broadway. Who was the sire of that behemoth?

Re: New calving season

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:51 pm
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
Bright Raven wrote:
Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:20 pm
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:03 am
2 week old calves look great. I had a big one yesterday, 128#, steer!
That beats my 123 pound Broadway. Who was the sire of that behemoth?
Mack AF - he is a red bull. Gives me great heifers, but even if his males are born under 100#, I castrate them. I don't rely heavily on EPD's, but out of this bull, the calf will not have good CE or BW EPD's. Even though there are many herds that could use a good growthy bull, all you need is ONE bad calving out of him and your farm name is MUD.
REPUTATION is everything in this business. I am extremely picky on what I leave a bull. Obviously, I wouldn't even consider a 120# + bull calf for breeding out of any bull.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 9:41 am
by lithuanian farmer
Have a new heifer born. Sired by Blonde d'Aquitaine bull with 112lbs bw. Heifer born at 286th day, 90.4lbs birth weight. Very easy calved, light boned and small calf.
This year the ones I wanted to be the heifers, most of them indeed are heifers.
Image

The pic of the sire, yearling.
Image
Image Grandsire.
Half sister of the bull. Should produce some great females.
Image

The bw average has dropped down to 111.3.

Re: New calving season

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:18 am
by lithuanian farmer
Had some nice weather today. It felt close to spring already. But warmth has brought some mud too.
Image

Calves enjoying their pen.
Image

Such a colour change after all red and black calves!
Image

Image Piedx bull calf still slim and tall, but is putting on weight bit by bit.
Two brothers inspecting the creep feeder. Very closely...
Image
Image