What should they bring

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of your favorite breed.
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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: What should they bring

Post by Jeanne - Simme Valley » Fri Dec 07, 2018 11:06 am

Right now, I just sold 4 culls at $1.30 hanging weight, through a dealer that ships them into Vermont for harvest.


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Re: What should they bring

Post by OleScout » Fri Dec 07, 2018 12:51 pm

Yesterday I sold 4 very old culls for and average of $0.23/lb live weight.

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Re: What should they bring

Post by Son of Butch » Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:33 pm

Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:Right now, I just sold 4 culls at $1.30 hanging weight, through a dealer that ships them into Vermont for harvest.

That's 30 cents higher than what is being paid for good hanging cows here... No wonder Vermonters are so grouchy. :)

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Re: What should they bring

Post by gcreekrch » Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:01 pm

Those heifers as breds might have brought $1100 yesterday depending on what they weighed. Not much demand for straight bred Herefords here. Less if they are polled.
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Re: What should they bring

Post by Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sat Dec 08, 2018 5:37 am

Son of Butch wrote:
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:Right now, I just sold 4 culls at $1.30 hanging weight, through a dealer that ships them into Vermont for harvest.

That's 30 cents higher than what is being paid for good hanging cows here... No wonder Vermonters are so grouchy. :)

Yes, if I sent them to slaughter plant in PA, that's what they would bring. I heard about the feedlot guy, that was marketing culls. Works for me!!!!
Our local sale barn (live) is $.55 right now for "good" cows.
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Re: What should they bring

Post by Stocker Steve » Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:43 am

An average year, which does not seem to happen often now days, is that serious winter sets in about mid December. So a hayless operation is not possible in the artic vortex unless you run Highlander x Musk ox F1s. :cowboy: The big business question is can you afford to run cows year round w/o free corn stalks?

The perennial grass grazer concern is what do you do with the big cool season production peak in late June? We sometimes hayed it, and other times trampled it... Currently we are running more yearlings with the cow herd. Last year they were a third by head count. Next year they will be a larger percentage.

So yearling eat the June/July surplus and then get sorted. Cows eat the standing stockpile in Oct/Nov before going on full winter feed. Stockpiling standing forage for grazing later works well as long as you have enough waxy grass in the forage mix. Fescue is the classic grass, OG is OK, reed canary sucks.
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Re: What should they bring

Post by Son of Butch » Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:36 am

Corn stalks are never free.
U of Wisconsin says there is 16-$20 of fertilizer value in each ton of corn stalk residual left on the field.
180 bushel corn produces 4.5 tons of corn stover residual per acre. Leave less than 2 ton as cover, then you run into
erosion losses which is hard to put a value on, but generally accepted as more than what corn stalks are worth.

Chopping, raking and baling removes 80% of the residual, which is 3.6 ton leaving less than 1 ton as cover.
Baling without chopping and raking removes 50%... 2.25 ton.
Cattle grazing corn stalks removes 1.4 ton of residual per acre and leaves 3.1 ton as cover. Plus cows leave manure
which replaces the fertilizer value they removed, making it the best option whenever possible.

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Re: What should they bring

Post by Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:25 am

SOB - that is great info. Never saw any articles on that, so never really thought about it. sure makes sense.
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Re: What should they bring

Post by Stocker Steve » Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:59 pm

Son of Butch wrote:Corn stalks are never free.


The western corn belt in particular grazes corn stalks. Custom winter grazing (free stalks but pay for labor & Infrastructure) is crazy low priced. Crazy low wintering cost is how they justify overpaying for summer pasture.
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Re: What should they bring

Post by Son of Butch » Sat Dec 08, 2018 1:14 pm

Stocker Steve wrote:
Son of Butch wrote:Corn stalks are never free.

Western corn belt usually grazes corn stalks. Free corn stalks is how they justify overpaying for summer pasture.

Fencing isn't free... but grazing is the best all around option.
My point was the hidden costs of baling corn stalks that most don't consider. I know in the past I've overlooked them.

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Re: What should they bring

Post by bball » Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:27 pm

Stocker Steve wrote:Putting row crop into complex upland mixtures to extend my grazing season. Other option is to double down with drain tile - - but the world does not need more beans. Don't think for a minute that China is going to just forget about it...

Legumes - RC base w/ a touch of WC, BFT, and alfalfa. I use some branched root alfalfa due to heavy soils.
Grasses - meadow fescue base w/ a touch of reed canary or OG. A lot of brome and timothy used here traditionally, but I don't think they are great for grazing.
Forbs - chicory

A bit rich for beef cows, but I am increasing the number of yearlings going back to grass, and a meadow fescue/clover base mix stockpiles well.


Can you give more info on the meadow fescue you use please and the soil types it thrives on?
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Re: What should they bring

Post by Stocker Steve » Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:55 pm

Stockpile to a grazer is standing forage grazed by cattle after the growing season ends. Usually created by not grazing after mid summer. Usually done to avoid the cost of baling and feeding forage... Stand ability, weather, stocking rate, and palatability are potential issues.

With low commodity prices and unusually heavy rains in many areas - - it should pencil out for most beef producers.
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Re: What should they bring

Post by Stocker Steve » Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:26 pm

bball wrote:Can you give more info on the meadow fescue you use please and the soil types it thrives on?


Likes moist locations. Most of our genetics originated in Europe. Some naturalized strains are now being commercialized. Not a silver bullet but it has its uses.

Much less common than tall fescue in the USA, which is higher yielding for DM, but TF does not generate as many # beef/acre in Wisconsin trials. *** Very high palatability can result in overgrazing MF when it is part of a mixed stand. ***

Barnenburg is the biggest MF supplier in my area. They have outstanding technical support. Give them a call.
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Re: What should they bring

Post by JHH » Wed Apr 03, 2019 6:52 pm

Son of Butch wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:40 pm
JHH wrote:Got a couple bred heifers I THINK I am going to try and sell. Depends on what they bring.
What do in guys think they will bring? I know it' just depends but thought I would ask.



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What happened with these girls?
IF you calved them out any pictures?
I sold them. Done ok at a special cattle sale. I am calving half sisters now.
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