By The Sweat of thier Brow

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hurleyjd
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By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby hurleyjd » Sat Jun 17, 2017 8:55 pm

This is long but good. What about logging at this time Georgia Jo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8HhWVzzcVc

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Sun Jun 18, 2017 6:55 am

That was another era for sure. I feel lucky to have been part of this and to have known and worked with shortwooders, turpentiners and the deer tongue collectors. Sadly, all these industries are gone now thanks to outrageous worker's compensation rates the insurance companies put these products especially wood sawn with a chainsaw. In 2000 the insurance companies were getting 10% of the gross on the truck. On top of this there was auto insurance and DOT regulations that had to be complied with which just made things not worthwhile and most called it quits. The last holdout I knew was Theo. Theo was 70 years old and had one helper who was 67. They had shortwooded all their lives and they would produce one truck a day and would normally call it a day sometime around lunch. The insurance companies and OSHA had passed regulations and restrictions trying to stop the flow of this type wood to the mill but the mill manager in our area stuck his neck out for Theo and allowed his wood to continue to come to the mill even though it could have raised his insurance rates. Its almost as if the government had conspired with the insurance companies to kill this industry and in the end they did.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby HDRider » Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:10 am

Bygones.
bball wrote: "The juice wasn't worth the squeeze."
Dun said, "You gotta be flexible. Do whatever you have to do for the best results within your limitations."

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Farm Fence Solutions » Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:58 am

Neat video. Al Gore is gonna chit a brick when he finds out YouTube has been around since the 50's.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby HDRider » Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:33 pm

That made me feel good to see that.
bball wrote: "The juice wasn't worth the squeeze."
Dun said, "You gotta be flexible. Do whatever you have to do for the best results within your limitations."

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby kickinbull » Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:51 pm

Its almost as if someone was conspiring to do away with small independent sole ownership businesses.

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby TexasBred » Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:27 pm

Farm Fence Solutions wrote:Neat video. Al Gore is gonna chit a brick when he finds out YouTube has been around since the 50's.

Whatchu talkin' bout Willis??? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Caustic Burno » Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:13 pm

Jogeephus wrote:That was another era for sure. I feel lucky to have been part of this and to have known and worked with shortwooders, turpentiners and the deer tongue collectors. Sadly, all these industries are gone now thanks to outrageous worker's compensation rates the insurance companies put these products especially wood sawn with a chainsaw. In 2000 the insurance companies were getting 10% of the gross on the truck. On top of this there was auto insurance and DOT regulations that had to be complied with which just made things not worthwhile and most called it quits. The last holdout I knew was Theo. Theo was 70 years old and had one helper who was 67. They had shortwooded all their lives and they would produce one truck a day and would normally call it a day sometime around lunch. The insurance companies and OSHA had passed regulations and restrictions trying to stop the flow of this type wood to the mill but the mill manager in our area stuck his neck out for Theo and allowed his wood to continue to come to the mill even though it could have raised his insurance rates. Its almost as if the government had conspired with the insurance companies to kill this industry and in the end they did.


Jo that wasn't a living but an existence.
I used to get sent to help my uncle in the summers haul pulp wood.
I am the NRA

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:55 pm

Caustic Burno wrote:Jo that wasn't a living but an existence.
I used to get sent to help my uncle in the summers haul pulp wood.


Compared to what? Theo would clear around $400/day in the early '90's and he and his helper would normally knock off just after lunch. I consider that pretty good money.
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Caustic Burno » Sun Jun 18, 2017 10:05 pm

Jogeephus wrote:
Caustic Burno wrote:Jo that wasn't a living but an existence.
I used to get sent to help my uncle in the summers haul pulp wood.


Compared to what? Theo would clear around $400/day in the early '90's and he and his helper would normally knock off just after lunch. I consider that pretty good money.



I couldn't see it.
Not knowing if you were going to work today or tomorrow.
Then if the skidder or truck broke down you were stuck until repairs were completed.
I am the NRA

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Jogeephus
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Sun Jun 18, 2017 10:40 pm

Caustic Burno wrote:
Jogeephus wrote:
Caustic Burno wrote:Jo that wasn't a living but an existence.
I used to get sent to help my uncle in the summers haul pulp wood.


Compared to what? Theo would clear around $400/day in the early '90's and he and his helper would normally knock off just after lunch. I consider that pretty good money.



I couldn't see it.
Not knowing if you were going to work today or tomorrow.
Then if the skidder or truck broke down you were stuck until repairs were completed.


It sounds like agriculture wouldn't be your cup of tea then because I don't know of anything in agriculture that is not effected by the weather or equipment breakdowns but not everyone can have or wants a desk job.
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Caustic Burno » Mon Jun 19, 2017 5:18 am

No barely getting by was not my cup of tea. I could see right quick there were smarter ways to make a living.
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Jogeephus
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:50 am

Caustic Burno wrote:No barely getting by was not my cup of tea. I could see right quick there were smarter ways to make a living.


Never knew a shortwooder who owned or used a skidder so maybe it was your uncle's technique that wasn't so smart. The beauty of shortwooding was the minimal equipment someone needed to get in the business. Typically shortwooders processed the waste tops left by larger logging outfits and this wood was basically free so it was like picking up free money in the woods which is why we had so many before the insurance companies put them out of business.
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby HDRider » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:57 am

Caustic Burno wrote:No barely getting by was not my cup of tea. I could see right quick there were smarter ways to make a living.

It is simply an opportunity, now lost. A man could start small and take it as far as he wanted. Not everyone is as smart as you, or headed in the same direction as you.
bball wrote: "The juice wasn't worth the squeeze."
Dun said, "You gotta be flexible. Do whatever you have to do for the best results within your limitations."

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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Caustic Burno » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:58 am

Jogeephus wrote:
Caustic Burno wrote:No barely getting by was not my cup of tea. I could see right quick there were smarter ways to make a living.


Never knew a shortwooder who owned or used a skidder so maybe it was your uncle's technique that wasn't so smart. The beauty of shortwooding was the minimal equipment someone needed to get in the business. Typically shortwooders processed the waste tops left by larger logging outfits and this wood was basically free so it was like picking up free money in the woods which is why we had so many before the insurance companies put them out of business.

That wasn't the way it was done in the piney woods early 60's.
The only short wood was pulp wood or you cut timber for saw logs. Skidded the tree to a set and cut and loaded the truck.
A skidder in those days was a tractor and a pair of log tongs.
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