Opinions on Breeding

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cowgirl Ibara
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Opinions on Breeding

Post by cowgirl Ibara » Mon Jul 16, 2007 9:55 pm

I have a golden retriever female who just tuned a year old. I m planning on her having her bred December of 08 after she has matured and gets OFA certified. But I have come to a dilemma about a sire. Sire charges are usually high and I was contemplating either buying my own certified sire or the option of A.I. But I haven’t heard much in the field of K-9 A.I. So any input or opinions are welcome and needed. Thanks


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Post by scott wilson » Tue Jul 17, 2007 9:10 am

Cowgirl, why are you breeding your be nice? Do you have plans for the pups. Are you trying to accomplish a specific goal with the breeding? While being OFA certified would be important for a large dog it would not mean the dog is of sufficient quality to breed.
The reason sire charges are high is because the owner spent much time and money getting the titles to prove his dog is worthy of your consideration. You should be able to locate a number of quality dogs by looking through a retriever magazine.
AI would only come into play after the stud was selected and could be used as a convenience.

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Post by cowgirl Ibara » Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:31 am

I'm interested in breeding her because she has champion lines, a wonderful temperament, and some traits that I would like see go down to her pups. For her pups my expectations for them are to become companions.
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Re: Opinions on Breeding

Post by Daisy452 » Wed Jul 18, 2007 1:28 pm

cowgirl Ibara wrote:I have a golden retriever female who just tuned a year old. I m planning on her having her bred December of 08 after she has matured and gets OFA certified. But I have come to a dilemma about a sire. Sire charges are usually high and I was contemplating either buying my own certified sire or the option of A.I. But I haven’t heard much in the field of K-9 A.I. So any input or opinions are welcome and needed. Thanks


You should wait to buy ur sire, you have college coming uo and need no further ditractions, as for her pups becoming champions, thats up to the family that buys the pups whether or not they will show, breed, or keep as a pet. The first couple of breeding i would do AI, or tell ur stable to buy a sire.
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Post by scott wilson » Wed Jul 18, 2007 2:09 pm

you could consider buying another pup from the breeders who produced the champion lines you mentioned. Dogs aren't cows and the culls are no good for eating. If your intentions are to get in the puppy mill business...........

If you are seriosly interested in learning to breed dogs for the improvment of the breed; look to one of of those champions in her pedigree. Best if you breed to the one that has those "qualities" you'd like to see passed on.

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Re: Opinions on Breeding

Post by 3MR » Wed Jul 18, 2007 2:14 pm

Daisy452 wrote:
cowgirl Ibara wrote:I have a golden retriever female who just tuned a year old. I m planning on her having her bred December of 08 after she has matured and gets OFA certified. But I have come to a dilemma about a sire. Sire charges are usually high and I was contemplating either buying my own certified sire or the option of A.I. But I haven’t heard much in the field of K-9 A.I. So any input or opinions are welcome and needed. Thanks


You should wait to buy ur sire, you have college coming uo and need no further ditractions, as for her pups becoming champions, thats up to the family that buys the pups whether or not they will show, breed, or keep as a pet. The first couple of breeding i would do AI, or tell ur stable to buy a sire.


She said her expectations for the pups were for them to become companions not champions
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Post by Howdyjabo » Wed Jul 18, 2007 3:08 pm

Theres more to breeding a dog(of a specific breed) than a pedigree-passing genetic tests and having champions in the background.

If you value the breed your goal should be not producing individual pups but maintaining the integrity of the breed.
To do that you have to have the background to know and understand the breed intimately.

Also even with the best bred litters the best you can hope for is that 30% of the litter has breedable qualities. The rest are the great companions.Lowering the initial goals to producing just great companions is watering down the breed--as there are so many more people that can do that and do-- than those that do it right.

Is your dog the ultimate example of the breed?
and do you know enough to identify the ultimate examples of the breed?

As far as paying for the stud-- If you can't find a quality stud that the owner is willing to breed your dog in exchange for a pup- thats a good sign that you shouldn't be breeding your be nice.

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Post by cowgirl Ibara » Wed Jul 18, 2007 5:37 pm

scott wilson wrote:you could consider buying another pup from the breeders who produced the champion lines you mentioned. Dogs aren't cows and the culls are no good for eating. If your intentions are to get in the puppy mill business...........

If you are seriosly interested in learning to breed dogs for the improvment of the breed; look to one of of those champions in her pedigree. Best if you breed to the one that has those "qualities" you'd like to see passed on.


As far as being a breeder I truely am in this for the long haul. I have the best intrest in mind for my dog and her pups. So I want to get things correct and do it right without rushing blindly into anything. I've studied the breed for sometime before even bought my pup so I have considered the matter greatly. But I've consulte the AKC, Gold Retrieve Club of America, and the breeder I bought my dog from so I could research and better notice the breed standard. But your advice is very helpful thank you ^_^
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Post by Daisy452 » Thu Jul 19, 2007 4:29 pm

Oh, another thing (just popped into my brain) is I heard you were feeding wet dog food. Are you mixing it with dry food to? You need to wach it because she'll gain weight fast, and its bad on her teeth. Yes i would still take her in to do blood work. (from the question you asked me earier) and sorry i misinterperated compainions for champions.
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Post by Brute 23 » Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:35 pm

I would say to any one who wants to breed anything... especially dogs, that you need to go work with some one for a while and see what it is all about, not what people tell you it is about, before you jump into it. See what that person does good and does bad.

As some one said already... dogs are not cows. You can't eat the culls. That is exactly right. ;-)

When a littler or pup doesn't turn out can you walk out there and hit them all in the back of the head with a shovel and then dig a hole for them? That is part of responsible breeding. Culling hard over the smallest imperfections.
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Post by Txwalt » Thu Jul 19, 2007 9:21 pm

Your dog has good blood lines and thats great. Has she won any shows? Do you show here? That doesn't really matter if she exhibits good Golden Retriver traits. Has she participated in hunting competitions. How has she done? Maybe she's one of those frisbee dogs thats very athletic. If she just has a good temperment that means very little with dogs. I'm sorry but most dogs have that. Thats why they are such a popular pet. Golden Retrievers as a breed are very popular because they are loyal, friendly, smart and hard workers that aim to please. After all they are a retrieving breed and you'll find that with most retrievers. Don't breed this dog just because you love her. Breed her because everyone that doesn't know her loves her. 3 to 4 million dogs are euthanized each year according to the humane society. If you read about breeding dogs you'll probably come to the same conclusion people on hear are expressing. Breed the proven best. I wish you the best whatever you decide to do.

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Post by cowgirl Ibara » Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:54 pm

Daisy452 wrote:Oh, another thing (just popped into my brain) is I heard you were feeding wet dog food. Are you mixing it with dry food to? You need to wach it because she'll gain weight fast, and its bad on her teeth. Yes i would still take her in to do blood work. (from the question you asked me earier) and sorry i misinterperated compainions for champions.


Yes I'm mixing her wet with the dry dog food. She only gets about half a can if even that. So I'm carefully managing her diet. But her teeth are good right now I've been brushing them three times a week. She doesnt seem to agree much with the toothpaste though ^_^
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Post by Beef11 » Tue Aug 07, 2007 5:11 pm

First off you need to decide the direction you are going with your program. Puppy mill, back yard breeder, Snooty show person, field dogs .... .. Then do what it takes to build a better dog in the direction you are headed. With Goldens they have virtually bred out the hunting ability that the dog was bred for so it makes you wonder if the show world has done any favors for a breed that has retriever in its name yet can't tell a pheasant from a fire hydrant. Most breeds have distinct bloodlines for show and again for function competition. Those that are truly trying to better a breed are breeding for form and function. Be careful as dog breeders are an explosive opionated crowd.
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Post by Limomike » Wed Aug 08, 2007 4:56 am

We used to raise dogs ( Schnauzers and Pointers) . I dont know if they AI dogs or not, but probably. I would suggest finding a legit stud dog. IF you plan on breeding more than once, then I woudl consider buying your own male.
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