Jersey x holstein

For the dairy folks and/or beef folks with questions about udders, milk and mastitis.
User avatar
regolith
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2716
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 9:58 pm
Location: New Zealand

Re: Jersey x holstein

Postby regolith » Sun Sep 04, 2016 1:49 pm

The 'farmers are rich' memo was always a bad myth - as I see it anyway, I've been involved in dairy farming for over 20 yrs now & doubt it was ever true before that.
I know of the Bullvine, don't always agree with the articles but they do keep up with what is happening in the dairy world.

One thing though. As a rule, farmers can feed their children, even if they don't have spare cash. (non-farming) society I grew up in that wasn't always the case.
0 x
Stepping backwards and progress are not mutually exclusive

User avatar
farmerjan
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1232
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2016 7:54 pm
Location: Shenandoah ValleyVirginia

Re: Jersey x holstein

Postby farmerjan » Mon Sep 05, 2016 12:13 pm

Yeah, I figure that when the world as we have known it crashes, and here in the US that may be sooner rather than later...the farmers will have the food then we will all be sitting at our gates with a gun to keep the starving takers, that have done nothing for themselves except collect from the gov't, from stealing what we worked our a**** off for. But we need to "share the wealth".... No I didn't mean farmers were rich, more in the line that they were respected members of the communities because they worked hard for what they had and had acquired assets that made them seem as more affluent. Like in the "old Days" in america, farmers were the backbone of the communities...
0 x

Wendyfhdqs
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2017 12:13 am
Location: Bulgaria
Contact:

Jersey x holstein

Postby Wendyfhdqs » Sat Oct 07, 2017 1:00 pm

I have been using Jersey raw for years to make cheeses. But the milk I have been using is getting harder to get lately. We have another raw milk source in the area that's a Holstein/Jersey cross. Does anyone out there
know about the fat and protein content of this kind of cross would generally be.

Andreark
0 x

User avatar
Son of Butch
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3804
Joined: Mon Aug 30, 2010 6:44 pm
Location: Frost Bite Falls, Minnesota

Re: Jersey x holstein

Postby Son of Butch » Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:38 pm

Jersey is the best for cheese production averaging 4.7 bf and 3.7 protein
Holstein x Jersey average 4.1 bf and 3.4 protein
Holstein 3.6 bf and 3.15 protein
0 x

User avatar
farmerjan
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1232
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2016 7:54 pm
Location: Shenandoah ValleyVirginia

Re: Jersey x holstein

Postby farmerjan » Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:50 pm

Every cow is different. I have a dairy farmer that milks 50-60 reg holsteins and reg brown swiss. About 60/40 holstein to swiss. His butterfat runs 4.0 to 4.3 at the milk plant and has many holsteins over 4% fat all the time. Not all the swiss are real high fat, but the majority are.

Look for the fat to run 4% if you are lucky and the protein to run in the 3.1 range. Is this person on DHIA testing? If so then the resulting test will tell what the fat/protein and scc is.

Some milk companies also list the SNF and that is important to the farms that are shipping milk mainly for making cheese. Michigan and states up there are more cheese manufacturing states.

OOPs, I just noticed you are in Bulgaria....so don't have any idea if there are companies that do milk testing like the Dairy Herd Improvement Association; although there must be some type of standardized testing so that proofs from registered bulls will show up and the semen can be shipped to a bull stud for distribution.

I have 2, 50/50 holstein jersey crosses; and a 3/4 jersey 1/4 holstein; as well as 2, 50/50 holstein/guernsey crosses. The 1/2 jersey crosses are running in the 3.8 to 4.0 % fat most of the time, and protein is in the 3.0 to 3.2. The 3/4 is running about 4.0 to 4.2% fat but her dam was a high fat holstein. The 2 guernsey/hol are running in the 3.9 % fat but they have more "yellow" color due to increased beta-carotene. My straight jersey runs about 4.2-4.5% and the old guernsey cow is about 4.0-4.2%. I don't push for production as much as a commercial dairy and they get alot of hay/pasture and not alot of grain which will up the fat more. Diet will play a big roll in the butterfat. I mostly am using them for nurse cows right now and they will raise 2-4 calves each lactation.

This is only a guess as some of it is dependent on whether the dam of the cow had a decent fat average. I know of a few holsteins that barely run 3.0 on fat so even a 1/2 jersey daughter from them might not make a very high fat.

Welcome to the Forum. Tell us about your operation, and what farming is like there. We have a regular poster from Lithuania that has some beautiful beef animals and she has several that have some dairy in their background, although I don't know if they milk any for themselves.
0 x

User avatar
Son of Butch
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3804
Joined: Mon Aug 30, 2010 6:44 pm
Location: Frost Bite Falls, Minnesota

Re: Jersey x holstein

Postby Son of Butch » Sun Oct 08, 2017 5:54 am

Wendyfhdqs wrote:I have been using Jersey raw for years to make cheeses. But the milk I have been using is getting harder to get lately.
We have another raw milk source in the area that's a Holstein/Jersey cross.
Does anyone out there know about the fat and protein content of this kind of cross would generally be.

Andreark

My guess is holstein/jersey milk will produce 10-12% less cheese per pound than straight jersey milk.
But that's just a guess.
0 x

cbcr
Trail Boss
Trail Boss
Posts: 344
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 2:06 am

Re: Jersey x holstein

Postby cbcr » Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:01 am

Son of Butch wrote:
Wendyfhdqs wrote:I have been using Jersey raw for years to make cheeses. But the milk I have been using is getting harder to get lately.
We have another raw milk source in the area that's a Holstein/Jersey cross.
Does anyone out there know about the fat and protein content of this kind of cross would generally be.

Andreark

My guess is holstein/jersey milk will produce 10-12% less cheese per pound than straight jersey milk.
But that's just a guess.


Many factors go into making cheese. Cows milk is around 87% water. if looking at the butterfat part, one cow producing 4.5%F vs a cow producing 4.5%F. based on 20 lbs of milk at 3.5%F= .9 lbs and 20 lbs of milk at 3.5%F = .7 lbs or a reduction of about 8%. so "Son of Butch" is about right in his quote.

While milk fat in the cows milk are important qualities in making cheese they are affected by the breed and the cows diet. The protein part of the milk contains the caseins, (kappa casein, beta casein and beta lactoglobulin) which are the most important as they bind together and help in the solidification of the milk during the cheesemaking process.

A better explanation of the Casein's is from the Basic genomic test from GeneSeek

Cheese Production
Kappa casein There are several forms of kappa casein – A, B and E – that are associated with milk protein and quality. These variants are related to renneting process for cheese production. Studies have also shown that cheddar cheese
yield can be up to 8% higher and mozzarella up to 12% higher with BB milk versus AA milk3. The E variant has an
adverse effect on cheese production.

BB: preferred result for cheese production
AB and BE: intermediate for cheese production.
AA and AE: least favorable result for cheese production.

Beta casein Like kappa casein, there are several different forms of beta casein (A and B). Higher milk yield is associated with the A variant while higher protein and casein yields are associated with the B variant. Beta casein B is similar in effect to Kappa casein B.

Beta lactoglobulin has a significant effect on casein number and cheese yield. The B variant has higher casein and cheese yields.
Beta lactoglobulin and Beta Casein
BB: most favorable result for casein and cheese yield.
AB: intermediate result for casein and cheese yield.
AA: least favorable result for casein and cheese yield.

IF looking at breeds based on CM$ (Cheese Merit Dollars) the breeds that rank the highest are Holstein, "Red" breeds (Swedish Red and White, Norwegian Red, Red Dane, North American Red, and Finnish Ayrshire) and the Jersey breed.

Another breed that produces excellent milk for cheese making is the Normande which is from France and they have more of the desirable casein components in their milk which can yield up to 20% higher cheese yeild.
0 x


Return to “Got Milk?”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests