Interesting reaction to dead heifer

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Talin
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Re: Interesting reaction to dead heifer

Post by Talin » Fri Sep 05, 2014 8:52 am

I went to a lecture on composting carcasses basically above ground put them in some old hay fenced to keep the pile intact and add some water in 4-6 months nothing but small bone pieces. Haven't tried it but seems fairly easy



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Nesikep
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Re: Interesting reaction to dead heifer

Post by Nesikep » Fri Sep 05, 2014 12:12 pm

I think our neighbors start to know the drill around here.. BANG!, and a couple minutes later the backhoe is at work!, Do it for cows as well as 'other' animals. Frozen ground doesn't work well though.

Cows definitely an 'emptiness' when a member of the herd dies. The big steer I sold to a friend a couple years back became best friends with his bull, and the bull went ballistic for days after Joules was put in the freezer. By friend put the hide in a burn pile, and the bull was out there in a torrential rain, digging it all back up.

I definitely notice the "sister groups" too, and there are some cows that other cows just CAN'T STAND to be around (CT is a bit like that). My old cow was always VERY aware of what was going on at the "udder end", and always knew if there was a milk thief around. One year she had a bit a late calf, so I left her with her calf (a replacement heifer), and the rest of the freshly weaned replacement heifers together. She had 1 granddaughter there, and would let her nurse.. I have a very good picture of this 16 year old cow, about 1300 lbs, with two 650 lb heifers nursing on her,.. sure made her look good! I also find cows are 'nicer' to their close relatives.

I used to have a pretty spooky heifer that was halterbroke, and I'd lead her around the yard to eat grass. One day we skinned a deer in front of the shop, and she NEVER AGAIN would go by the place, always had to walk around the long way. I think some are far more sensitive than others.
What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence
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selenahill21
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Re: Interesting reaction to dead heifer

Post by selenahill21 » Tue Dec 16, 2014 8:24 am

This is interesting! Can someone show me a regulations on how we are supposed to dispose carcasses? Apparently, carcass removal has been a huge issue since the news about carcass removal leads to $417,000 lawsuit. Phone books are a million-dollar information market. Errors in phone books have resulted in everything from decreased listings to regulatory investigations. Phone book provider Dex has been filed suit against for incorrectly listing a BBQ diner below "carcass removal".

baptistebruno
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Re: Interesting reaction to dead heifer

Post by baptistebruno » Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:48 pm

I had also faced the same situation when I found a dead deer on my lawn. But fortunately, I got to know about Urban Wildlife Control that offers dead animal removal services in Atlanta.

deaddeerremovalatl[dot]com

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darcelina4
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Re: Interesting reaction to dead heifer

Post by darcelina4 » Thu Nov 28, 2019 11:20 am

We usually bury dead animals. If it is smaller, I hand dig the hole. It is all sand where I live. Big ones we have a neighbor (80 years young) with a backhoe that buries them. In January, my 31 year old thoroughbred mare died. It was really cold (15 degrees) with ice and snow and 25 mile an hour wind. He was sick and could not come out in that weather. We had our other neighbor drag out to the back of the pasture where there is a big depression so noone would see the body from the road. A few days later the backhoe guy said he could come over. We looked at the horse and another neighbors starving dogs were eating her. We decided not to bury her but to feed those poor dogs. It was so cold so no bad odor. Then in may a 25 year old thoroughbred mare died. We had the backhoe guy bury her right away..... Back in June 2007, we had a 2 month old colt die from pneumonia. I was cash strapped so I spent 6 hours digging a hole. If was 5 feet deep, 4 ft wide by 4ft wide. My sister came and helped me get the body out of the barn, drug with the truck out to hole, and in the hole. The horses were all freaking out. She had a big stick and had to keep waving them back. I spent 2 more hours putting the dirt back over him. Them it started to rain. It was about 1am by this time. We got 12 inches of rain in the next 24 hours. In the morning my dad was sick so we took him to the hospital. We were busy with work and seeing my dad at the hospital for a few days so I just watered horses and only fed a few. They had round bales already. Then the horrid smell was here. I made me vomit. With all the rain, the colt had blew up with gas and floated up through the sand to the surface. He was half out of the ground. It was too muddy near the gates to get in with a tractor to cover him. I had to get hydrated lime and put over him to curb the stench. A month later another old horse died. When the backhoe guy finished burying her, he pushed dirt over the ribs still stinking out of the ground from the colt. This is why farming can be so yucky sometimes. But as for the original post, I do see animals freak out and cry endlessly when another is dead. When the 31 year old mare died, her penmate was in a big depression for about a month.

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