If you haven't seen - What Is A "Freemartin"?

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If you haven't seen - What Is A "Freemartin"?

Post by Old Dog/New Tricks » Sat Apr 08, 2006 1:38 pm

Today 4/7/2006 4:30:00 PM

Cattle Update: What Is A "Freemartin"?

Freemartinism is recognized as one of the most severe forms of sexual abnormality among cattle. This condition causes infertility in the female cattle born twin to a male. When a heifer twin shares the uterus with a bull fetus, they also share the placental membranes connecting the fetuses with the dam.

A joining of the placental membranes occurs at about the fortieth day of pregnancy, and thereafter, the fluids of the two fetuses are mixed. This causes exchange of blood and antigens carrying characteristics that are unique to each heifers and bulls. When these antigens mix, they affect each other in a way that causes each to develop with some characteristics of the other sex.

Although the male twin in this case may be only slightly affected by reduced fertility, in over ninety percent of the cases, the female twin is completely infertile. Because of a transfer of hormones or a transfer of cells, the heifer's reproductive tract is severely underdeveloped and sometimes even contains some elements of a bull's reproductive tract. A freemartin is genetically female, but has many characteristics of a male. The ovaries of the freemartin do not develop correctly, and they remain very small. Also, the ovaries of a freemartin do not produce the hormones necessary to induce the behavioral signs of heat. The external vulvar region can range from a very normal looking female to a female that appears to be male. Usually, the vulva is normal except that in some animals an enlarged clitoris and large tufts of vulvar hair exist. Freemartinism cannot be prevented; however, it can be diagnosed in a number of ways ranging from simple examination of the placental membranes to chromosomal evaluation. The cattleman can predict the very poor reproductive value of this heifer calf at birth and save the feed and development costs if he is aware of the high probability of freemartinism. In some cases, there are no symptoms of freemartinism because the male twin may have been aborted at an earlier stage of gestation.

Estimates of the percentage of natural beef cattle births that produce twins vary. One estimate (Gilmore) puts the percentage at about 0.5% or 1 in every 200 births. Another study, Rutledge et al, (1975) reported on the frequency of twins in beef cattle. This paper was in the Journal of Animal Science, Volume 40; page 803. They found small differences in the likelihood of twins in two different breeds of beef cattle. Herefords were reported to have 0.4% or about 1 out of 250 births to be twins. Angus had a slightly higher incidence of twins at 1.1% or about 1 out of each 100 births.

Approximately one-half of the sets of twins should contain both a bull and a heifer calf. The bottom line is: Don’t save heifers born twins to bulls as replacement females.

Source: Glenn Selk, OSU Extension Cattle Reproduction Specialist


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Post by milkmaid » Sat Apr 08, 2006 8:43 pm

Good article. Thanks.
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

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Post by rkm » Sat Apr 08, 2006 9:56 pm

If you have a set of mixed twins and the heifer is one the 10% that is fertile, is the bull twin to her infertile? I was told this many years ago. Also I have been told that breeding with bulls that were twins will not increase the frequency of twins in your herd. True or not ?

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Post by milkmaid » Sat Apr 08, 2006 10:14 pm

I heard it was always only the heifer out of any mixed set of twins that would (possibly) be infertile. In utero, the bull calf's reproductive tract starts developing sooner than the heifer calf's and if there is a common blood transfer between the two fetuses, his hormones prevent her reproductive organs from developing normally. If there is no blood circulation between the two developing fetuses, the heifer is fine. Either way the bull calf won't have problems.
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

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Post by dun » Sat Apr 08, 2006 11:44 pm

rkm wrote:I have been told that breeding with bulls that were twins will not increase the frequency of twins in your herd. True or not ?


The bull that was the twin won;t sire anymore twins, he doesn;t have an affect on that. But his daughters may be more prone to twinning.

dun

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Post by rkm » Sun Apr 09, 2006 8:54 am

Dun, I have to think about that for a minute. Are you you saying that he will pass the gene to his daughters and they could have twins.

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Post by dun » Sun Apr 09, 2006 9:16 am

rkm wrote:Dun, I have to think about that for a minute. Are you you saying that he will pass the gene to his daughters and they could have twins.


Correct.

dun

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