How long after feet are sticking out?

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Dana Kopp
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calving

Post by Dana Kopp » Fri Mar 31, 2006 10:18 am

Another thing to take into consideration is how hard she is working and if she has been disturbed or not. A cow/heifer that has been laid back pushing hard and not making progress should send up red flags, especially if she can't stand up and/or is obviously tired. A cow/heifer that has been walking and up and down a lot but hasn't really given any good pushes may just need more positioning time and more time to dilate. And a cow/heifer that started calving and has been disturbed, either by other cows or people may take awhile to get back to business - especially if she is a little wild. BUT if it looks like they are giving up...hard pushes with no progress and then they get up and go start eating, lots of bellering, rolling totally on their side and you either haven't seen feet or feet are there but no nose, and they aren't moving in or out... I'd "dive" in!! We check for progress every 15 minutes unless we think there might be a problem, then we watch constantly. Time can be in a warp when you are watching them calve so make sure to check your watch - 2 minutes can seem like 10.


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Post by rgv » Fri Mar 31, 2006 12:47 pm

Question -

Say you have a cow that had feet showing, gets up they go back in, lays down & pushes, no progress etc ets. An hour goes by, check and everything is in place - two feet and a nose. After 1.5 hours you start helping pull the calf. At what point of delivery is the calve in danger. I had a giant calve I had to pull out of a cow I bought, had know idea what pop was like.
Even when she got out the front shoulders , had to keep helping to get out the remainder.
When I fianly got the head out (blockhead), Its tounge was hanging out, thought it was dead at first.

Happy Ending - Big black baldy bull calf on.

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Post by dun » Fri Mar 31, 2006 2:00 pm

When you feel around and see everything is in place you should be able to tell if it's bigheaded, heavy boned, etc. After I check them, if they lay down and push for 15 minuts or so and nothing gets rolling, I just pull them.
As to when they're in danger, that's a crap shoot. Depends on what's going on inside, if the placenta detaches, etc. Almost every calf I've pulled has had the tongue hanging out. Tickle/poke the inside of the nostrils with a straw and they'll come around if they're not dead. Usually!

dun

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Re: How long after feet are sticking out?

Post by alacattleman » Fri Mar 31, 2006 2:27 pm

ebkyle2 wrote:How long do you typically wait after you see the feet protruding before you provide assistance?

Assuming the heifer is large enough, in the proper BCS, bred to a PROVEN calving ease bull and the feet indicate it is a normal presentation.

I couldn't take the suspense so I pulled a calf the other day. Mom and baby are fine, but I am just wondering what you all use as a rule of thumb.
first calvers for me are aways a concern that is why i like to see them progressing . but to hang around them while there calving is going too delay it some they caint concentrate on the business at hand with you watching over them like a mother hen

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Post by Fred » Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:03 pm

I read that with first calf heifers if you go in and assist them they are better off even if they could have still delivered on their own with some difficulty. Seems the assisted heifers rebred quicker due to less calving stress. I believe in intervening quickly with first calvers.

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Re: calving

Post by 1848 » Sat Apr 01, 2006 10:08 am

Dana Kopp wrote:Another thing to take into consideration is how hard she is working and if she has been disturbed or not. A cow/heifer that has been laid back pushing hard and not making progress should send up red flags, especially if she can't stand up and/or is obviously tired. A cow/heifer that has been walking and up and down a lot but hasn't really given any good pushes may just need more positioning time and more time to dilate. And a cow/heifer that started calving and has been disturbed, either by other cows or people may take awhile to get back to business - especially if she is a little wild. BUT if it looks like they are giving up...hard pushes with no progress and then they get up and go start eating, lots of bellering, rolling totally on their side and you either haven't seen feet or feet are there but no nose, and they aren't moving in or out... I'd "dive" in!! We check for progress every 15 minutes unless we think there might be a problem, then we watch constantly. Time can be in a warp when you are watching them calve so make sure to check your watch - 2 minutes can seem like 10.


Good points Kopp!

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Post by cfpinz » Sat Apr 01, 2006 9:34 pm

When I find a cow in labor and all appears normal, I make it a point to leave her alone and go somewhere out of her sight for 1/2 an hour. If you stand around and watch, I feel like you're doing more harm than good. If after 1/2 hr there's no progress, it's time to make a dicision.

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Post by 1848 » Sun Apr 02, 2006 12:01 pm

cfpinz wrote:When I find a cow in labor and all appears normal, I make it a point to leave her alone and go somewhere out of her sight for 1/2 an hour. If you stand around and watch, I feel like you're doing more harm than good. If after 1/2 hr there's no progress, it's time to make a dicision.

cfpinz


Another good point. You can make an animal so nervous she will delay calving or have added stress at calving. Got to give them space. ;-)

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