Schools out!!

Got a calving or breeding question? Get an answer.
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El_Putzo
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Schools out!!

Post by El_Putzo » Mon Mar 13, 2006 11:44 am

Finished up with AI school yesterday and wanted to hear any tips and tricks from you AI Gurus on little things to do to help with conception rates. I know that heat detection is a major factor, but are there any small things you do that you think gets you a little better conception rate, such as massaging the repro tract and/or clitoris.......


James

Gun control means using both hands!

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LangCattleCompany
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Post by LangCattleCompany » Mon Mar 13, 2006 12:18 pm

Where did you do your school, and who through?

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El_Putzo
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Post by El_Putzo » Mon Mar 13, 2006 12:21 pm

Clark MO, which is just north of Columbia MO. The class was through Cattle Visions.

http://www.onlinebullstud.com/index.html
James

Gun control means using both hands!

lcupit

Post by lcupit » Mon Mar 13, 2006 9:36 pm

Heat detection is the most important and the rest is practice, practice, and practice. ;-)

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dun
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Post by dun » Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:36 am

As has been posted, heat detection is the single most crucial elemnt of succesful AI. We use a horny steer, but painting the tail head or K-Mar patches or some of the newer silver looking scratch off patches work good too. A half hour morning and evening is the minimum. Looking in on them during the day also helps. In many ways it's like calving. Noticing anything that's unusual behaviour for that animal, looking for swelling of the vulva, etc. I just bred 2 heifers for the neighbor that showed no active signs of heat, no riding, chinning, being ridden, nothing. He saw the vulva swelling and when I bred them the mucus poured out and the cervix was so open you could drive a truck through it. After breeding a couple of the other heifers came over, sniffed them and wandered off.
After heat detection the other elemnts are all equaly important. Quality semen that has been properly handled through out it's span from collecting to deposition in the cow, proper deposition and placement, cow not overly agitated, experience, patience and cow side manner.

dun

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jenna
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Post by jenna » Tue Mar 14, 2006 11:09 am

Hi,
I'm fairly new at this to. I graduated about a year and a half ago. I do most of the ai work on our farm. the best thing I have found that helps is practice. Good technique is also vary important of course. We bred 41 the day the picture was taken. Luckily my mom helped out :lol:
good luck

Image[/img]

AngusLimoX
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Post by AngusLimoX » Tue Mar 14, 2006 3:34 pm

Is this a doctored picture? What happened to your hand??

:lol: :lol:
If it isn't Scottish - it's CRAP!! ( Does not apply to CAB ).

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CattleAnnie
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Post by CattleAnnie » Tue Mar 14, 2006 6:42 pm

Jenna, you brave soul!

Where the sam hill are your coveralls (and wearing a white shirt - yoiks)?! :shock:

(Can you guess who does the laundry in our house? ;-) )

Seriously though, good to see another young person involved in agriculture.


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edb130
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Post by edb130 » Tue Mar 14, 2006 7:09 pm

It may or may not help but when I use to AI all our dairy cattle I always did it in the milk barn where I could give the cow grain to eat while I inseminated her. I had very good conception rates and I tend to think it was because the cows were happy at the time. I've been thinking about putting a post with a feed pan swing arm next to my squeeze chute to feed the cows while I breed them. My conception rates are still very good but any little thing that helps including calming the animal can by useful IMO.
I'd rather be farming!!!

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Post by buckaroo_bif » Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:52 pm

Jenna do you always pet cows from behind like that?
I would be careful she might kick!

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jenna
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Post by jenna » Thu Mar 16, 2006 8:30 am

Didn't even notice the hand right away, must of been mom. My brother took the picture for a project in his ag class. And actually by the time we were done, my shirt was fairly clean yet. (just a lucky day I guess) I bred about half and mom did the rest. Also, I wouldn't think of breeding the beef or heifers like this, but I have never been kicked yet by the older dairy cows (knock on wood).
Jenna

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Post by Bez! » Thu Mar 16, 2006 9:08 am

jenna wrote:Hi,
I'm fairly new at this to. I graduated about a year and a half ago. I do most of the ai work on our farm. the best thing I have found that helps is practice. Good technique is also vary important of course. We bred 41 the day the picture was taken. Luckily my mom helped out :lol:
good luck

Image[/img]


Jenna

I really appreciated the pic.

I am also really happy to se someone your age involved in the industry.

Keep practising, keep increasing your education - look at it as a potential business - who knows where you will be in 10 years.

Good on ya',

Bez!

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Post by Beef11 » Thu Mar 16, 2006 10:49 pm

I put alot of stress on careful and proper handling before you put it in the cow. If you kill it before you put it in there it doesn't matter how good you are. With AI you need to do it all well.
What can't you catch with a fast horse and a long rope?

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Susie David
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Post by Susie David » Fri Mar 17, 2006 8:02 am

Jenna, Great post...thanks for sharing. Hope that Dave doesn't start getting ideas...I have enough to do.
Susie
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"From Pasture to Plate 100% Natural Beef"

Diehard40
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Post by Diehard40 » Tue Mar 21, 2006 1:03 pm

Hi,
I'm fairly new at this to. I graduated about a year and a half ago. I do most of the ai work on our farm. the best thing I have found that helps is practice. Good technique is also vary important of course. We bred 41 the day the picture was taken. Luckily my mom helped out
good luck

[/img]

jenna,
watch out where you point.

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