Breeding

Got a calving or breeding question? Get an answer.
Bfields30
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Breeding

Post by Bfields30 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:25 pm

4yr old cow took to vet preg check was open was running with bull since May calved in feb.
Two vets checked said she had scar tissue inside but told me don’t be alarmed but I don’t know if should sell her good looking cow f1 brangus raised a big calf. Have another 7yr old cow calved in feb and was pregnant 2 months pregnant but feel like she should’ve been farther along she raised a biggest calf out of my cows. But loss condition she’s back in good condition now don’t know if i should sell both or keep both. This my first season having cows and there having to breed back bought all of them bred or as pairs. Should i sell them or give them a chance I’m not sure? How long usually should breed back window be?



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Re: Breeding

Post by ccr » Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:49 pm

i think cows should have a calf every 12 months, so breed back window would be maximum 90 days. our vet says it takes 60 days to breed back, but we have had them breed back in 30 days.

we keep bull with cows for 75 days, if not bred something is astray. just my thoughts on what we do (i'm no expert)
i know as much about this as anything else i don't know much about
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Re: Breeding

Post by Bright Raven » Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:53 pm

A cow should restart releasing an egg and thus have an estrus cycle about 30 days postpartum. I have seen my cows display estrus behavior as early as 14 days postpartum. Generally, I would consider a cycle that early as being false. A cow can routinely breed back as early as 40 days postpartum. As a rule, a cow should be permitted to have 60 days postpartum for the uterus to heal. If you expect to hold to a specific calving season, you would breed your cows approximately 90 days postpartum.

If cows get sufficient nutrition and are disease free especially with regard to diseases affecting fertility and the health of the fetus, they should have no problem breeding back.

When I hear circumstances that you describe, it comes to my mind that you may have a problem with your nutrition program or you have a disease in your herd affecting fertility or the health of the fetus.
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Re: Breeding

Post by bird dog » Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:58 pm

If the cows lose condition, mother nature will take care of them and they will sometimes not breed back on schedule to stay on the one calf a year program.

This is the main reason they tell you to have your cows at a body score of 5 or better when they calve. If less than that your odds to rebreed go down.

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Re: Breeding

Post by Bfields30 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:46 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:53 pm
A cow should restart releasing an egg and thus have an estrus cycle about 30 days postpartum. I have seen my cows display estrus behavior as early as 14 days postpartum. Generally, I would consider a cycle that early as being false. A cow can routinely breed back as early as 40 days postpartum. As a rule, a cow should be permitted to have 60 days postpartum for the uterus to heal. If you expect to hold to a specific calving season, you would breed your cows approximately 90 days postpartum.

If cows get sufficient nutrition and are disease free especially with regard to diseases affecting fertility and the health of the fetus, they should have no problem breeding back.

When I hear circumstances that you describe, it comes to my mind that you may have a problem with your nutrition program or you have a disease in your herd affecting fertility or the health of the fetus.
I asked vet is it nutrition he said both were in good body score especially the 4 yr old she looks really good. Can you elaborate on nutrition though Bull is out all year

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Re: Breeding

Post by Bfields30 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:47 pm

bird dog wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:58 pm
If the cows lose condition, mother nature will take care of them and they will sometimes not breed back on schedule to stay on the one calf a year program.

This is the main reason they tell you to have your cows at a body score of 5 or better when they calve. If less than that your odds to rebreed go down.
So would you sell or keep

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Re: Breeding

Post by Bfields30 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:48 pm

ccr wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:49 pm
i think cows should have a calf every 12 months, so breed back window would be maximum 90 days. our vet says it takes 60 days to breed back, but we have had them breed back in 30 days.

we keep bull with cows for 75 days, if not bred something is astray. just my thoughts on what we do (i'm no expert)
Bull been with the 7 yr old since March she calved in Feb
Last edited by Bfields30 on Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Breeding

Post by ccr » Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:52 pm

could it be a problem with the bull?
i know as much about this as anything else i don't know much about
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Re: Breeding

Post by Bright Raven » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:19 pm

Bfields30 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:46 pm
Bright Raven wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:53 pm
A cow should restart releasing an egg and thus have an estrus cycle about 30 days postpartum. I have seen my cows display estrus behavior as early as 14 days postpartum. Generally, I would consider a cycle that early as being false. A cow can routinely breed back as early as 40 days postpartum. As a rule, a cow should be permitted to have 60 days postpartum for the uterus to heal. If you expect to hold to a specific calving season, you would breed your cows approximately 90 days postpartum.

If cows get sufficient nutrition and are disease free especially with regard to diseases affecting fertility and the health of the fetus, they should have no problem breeding back.

When I hear circumstances that you describe, it comes to my mind that you may have a problem with your nutrition program or you have a disease in your herd affecting fertility or the health of the fetus.
I asked vet is it nutrition he said both were in good body score especially the 4 yr old she looks really good. Can you elaborate on nutrition though Bull is out all year
Nutrition is a function of more than body score. There are micronutrients such as copper, selenium, zinc, phosphorus, etc that improve fertility. I use VitaFerm ConceptAid. It assures good reproductive performance. Vitamins are also formulated into VitaFerm. I operate 100 % AI. I think good mineral contributes to my success. My calves are very thrifty. My cows pass the placenta right after partum. They breed back promptly.

It could be the bull but if your cows have adequate nutrition, my next step would be to run a blood panel to test for disease such as Neospora. Leptospira, BVD, etc.
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Re: Breeding

Post by bird dog » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:24 pm

Bfields30 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:47 pm
bird dog wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:58 pm
If the cows lose condition, mother nature will take care of them and they will sometimes not breed back on schedule to stay on the one calf a year program.

This is the main reason they tell you to have your cows at a body score of 5 or better when they calve. If less than that your odds to rebreed go down.
So would you sell or keep
Normally I would say cull the 7 Y.O. but she would go to the packers and that price is not very good. The 4 Y.O. is a tough choice and would depend on how well you like the cow.
Last year I had 8 out of 60 calve late plus one that did not calve at all. Looking back at it, I let them get to thin because I was not certain I had enough hay. The next calving period (this Year) I fed better hay and more of it and I have only one that is late. I still have 11 to go.

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Re: Breeding

Post by Bfields30 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:43 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:19 pm
Bfields30 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:46 pm
Bright Raven wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:53 pm
A cow should restart releasing an egg and thus have an estrus cycle about 30 days postpartum. I have seen my cows display estrus behavior as early as 14 days postpartum. Generally, I would consider a cycle that early as being false. A cow can routinely breed back as early as 40 days postpartum. As a rule, a cow should be permitted to have 60 days postpartum for the uterus to heal. If you expect to hold to a specific calving season, you would breed your cows approximately 90 days postpartum.

If cows get sufficient nutrition and are disease free especially with regard to diseases affecting fertility and the health of the fetus, they should have no problem breeding back.

When I hear circumstances that you describe, it comes to my mind that you may have a problem with your nutrition program or you have a disease in your herd affecting fertility or the health of the fetus.
I asked vet is it nutrition he said both were in good body score especially the 4 yr old she looks really good. Can you elaborate on nutrition though Bull is out all year
Nutrition is a function of more than body score. There are micronutrients such as copper, selenium, zinc, phosphorus, etc that improve fertility. I use VitaFerm ConceptAid. It assures good reproductive performance. Vitamins are also formulated into VitaFerm. I operate 100 % AI. I think good mineral contributes to my success. My calves are very thrifty. My cows pass the placenta right after partum. They breed back promptly.

It could be the bull but if your cows have adequate nutrition, my next step would be to run a blood panel to test for disease such as Neospora. Leptospira, BVD, etc.
Bull has other cows heavy bred 3 heifers calving next month and have other cows due feb March

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Re: Breeding

Post by Bfields30 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:44 pm

ccr wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:52 pm
could it be a problem with the bull?
He’s a 28 month old bull besides those two everything else is bred heavy or medium bred.

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Re: Breeding

Post by Bright Raven » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:51 pm

Bfields30 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:43 pm
Bright Raven wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:19 pm
Bfields30 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:46 pm


I asked vet is it nutrition he said both were in good body score especially the 4 yr old she looks really good. Can you elaborate on nutrition though Bull is out all year
Nutrition is a function of more than body score. There are micronutrients such as copper, selenium, zinc, phosphorus, etc that improve fertility. I use VitaFerm ConceptAid. It assures good reproductive performance. Vitamins are also formulated into VitaFerm. I operate 100 % AI. I think good mineral contributes to my success. My calves are very thrifty. My cows pass the placenta right after partum. They breed back promptly.

It could be the bull but if your cows have adequate nutrition, my next step would be to run a blood panel to test for disease such as Neospora. Leptospira, BVD, etc.
Bull has other cows heavy bred 3 heifers calving next month and have other cows due feb March
A blood panel is cheap. Fill 2 to 3 vials with blood collected from the caudal vein under the tail. They run a test for antibodies to the common pathogens that cause abortions or failure to conceive. After the first test, you will know what your cows might have contracted. If you vaccinate, then you might need to run a second panel to determine if the antibodies are due to clinical disease or an immune response to vaccination.
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Re: Breeding

Post by ccr » Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:01 pm

blood panel sounds good.

i think it would be good to know what is happening before deciding to sell or not.

we usually take the advice of our vet. discuss with them and see what they think.
i know as much about this as anything else i don't know much about
happiness is healthy cattle

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Re: Breeding

Post by Bfields30 » Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:04 pm

ccr wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:01 pm
blood panel sounds good.

i think it would be good to know what is happening before deciding to sell or not.

we usually take the advice of our vet. discuss with them and see what they think.
The vet told me don’t sell the 4 yo give her more time. Two vets checked her today.

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