AI breeding in hot summer conditions

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Brookhill Angus
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AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Brookhill Angus » Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:16 am

Two nights ago we bred this young cow to SAV America 8018.

340

Video:

http://bit.ly/2FR22yr

The heat was not easy to detect visually, just a little bit of sniffing. Here is what the Moo Monitor was showing us, which helped greatly in our decision to breed her.

339

The temps were high that day, cattle were barely moving, all of them under the trees until evening came around.

I spoke with our vet when I was picking up a bottle of GnRH and he told me that breeding in summer is very hard to do, the heats are tough to spot and the likelihood of it sticking was low. While I agree with him overall, we still have been able to successfully settle them and have a healthy calf on down the road. Hence the reason for going ahead with things.

Not sure if we got her, will know when we Biopryn test her in 28 days.

Would like to hear others input on breeding in hot summer months, successes, failures, general opinion. Thanks!


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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:50 am

I leave it up to the bulls to figure out.
You're not paranoid, they really are out to get you!

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Bcompton53 » Fri Jun 28, 2019 12:13 pm

everything is harder in the summer. The cattle don't want to cooperate, they don't show heat until after dark. I believe they are a little tougher to settle. This is a big reason why we have fall calves on our AI herd.

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Dsteim » Fri Jun 28, 2019 4:48 pm

Brookhill Angus wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:16 am
Two nights ago we bred this young cow to SAV America 8018.

340

Video:

http://bit.ly/2FR22yr

The heat was not easy to detect visually, just a little bit of sniffing. Here is what the Moo Monitor was showing us, which helped greatly in our decision to breed her.

339

The temps were high that day, cattle were barely moving, all of them under the trees until evening came around.

I spoke with our vet when I was picking up a bottle of GnRH and he told me that breeding in summer is very hard to do, the heats are tough to spot and the likelihood of it sticking was low. While I agree with him overall, we still have been able to successfully settle them and have a healthy calf on down the road. Hence the reason for going ahead with things.

Not sure if we got her, will know when we Biopryn test her in 28 days.

Would like to hear others input on breeding in hot summer months, successes, failures, general opinion. Thanks!
About how much does it cost to setup that moo monitor system? What all does the data show you besides heats?

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by WinterSpringsFarm » Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:16 pm

Epic failure here much past June 1 it seems. I bred 2 of my better cows and turned them out with the bull 3 weeks ago. As of this evening I'm certain he has serviced one and have a feeling he has done both.

Prior to that we have been running great 1x service conception rates as well as embryos sticking.

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Brookhill Angus » Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:12 am

Dsteim wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 4:48 pm
Brookhill Angus wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:16 am
Two nights ago we bred this young cow to SAV America 8018.

340

Video:

http://bit.ly/2FR22yr

The heat was not easy to detect visually, just a little bit of sniffing. Here is what the Moo Monitor was showing us, which helped greatly in our decision to breed her.

339

The temps were high that day, cattle were barely moving, all of them under the trees until evening came around.

I spoke with our vet when I was picking up a bottle of GnRH and he told me that breeding in summer is very hard to do, the heats are tough to spot and the likelihood of it sticking was low. While I agree with him overall, we still have been able to successfully settle them and have a healthy calf on down the road. Hence the reason for going ahead with things.

Not sure if we got her, will know when we Biopryn test her in 28 days.

Would like to hear others input on breeding in hot summer months, successes, failures, general opinion. Thanks!
About how much does it cost to setup that moo monitor system? What all does the data show you besides heats?
The base station is about $6k, each collar is about $200, you will need a dedicated DSL broadband connection for each base station. You could get started on a small scale for under $10k, or the costs could go up substantially as you increase collars and base stations. Depends on how big you want the system to be.

As for what else you can see besides heats, you see rumination, resting, feeding, and activity intensity in addition to behavior alerts and heat alerts. This can be invaluable because it allows you to quickly check your herd daily in a way that a visual check could never compare to. If you see rumination plummet, you had better be out looking at that cow ASAP to find out what’s wrong.
"When someone tells you it can't be done, it's more a reflection of their limitations, not yours"

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Brookhill Angus » Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:13 am

WinterSpringsFarm wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:16 pm
Epic failure here much past June 1 it seems. I bred 2 of my better cows and turned them out with the bull 3 weeks ago. As of this evening I'm certain he has serviced one and have a feeling he has done both.

Prior to that we have been running great 1x service conception rates as well as embryos sticking.
The heat wave has been brutal so I can understand where you are coming from.
"When someone tells you it can't be done, it's more a reflection of their limitations, not yours"

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Ebenezer » Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:39 am

In heat, the problem is not fertilization but attachment and retention within the two weeks after fertilization.

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:53 am

Ebenezer wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:39 am
In heat, the problem is not fertilization but attachment and retention within the two weeks after fertilization.
I sure we have good results. I intentionally held the bulls out until June 15th this year to try and escape calving in late winter.
You're not paranoid, they really are out to get you!

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by bse » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:30 am

I bred 25 this morning, put $25 worth of patches on them, 22 I know had been in heat the other 3 felt good. Repatch in 17 days and with the bull will know. 50 bucks for 2 patches, less than blood test alone.
Gonna do more next week, i havent done to many this late before, the cattle are responding well.

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by TennesseeTuxedo » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:49 am

bse wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:30 am
I bred 25 this morning, put $25 worth of patches on them, 22 I know had been in heat the other 3 felt good. Repatch in 17 days and with the bull will know. 50 bucks for 2 patches, less than blood test alone.
Gonna do more next week, i havent done to many this late before, the cattle are responding well.
I hope they all stick. It gonna be hot from here on out.
You're not paranoid, they really are out to get you!

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Dsteim » Sat Jun 29, 2019 2:59 pm

Brookhill Angus wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:12 am
Dsteim wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 4:48 pm
Brookhill Angus wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:16 am
Two nights ago we bred this young cow to SAV America 8018.

340

Video:

http://bit.ly/2FR22yr

The heat was not easy to detect visually, just a little bit of sniffing. Here is what the Moo Monitor was showing us, which helped greatly in our decision to breed her.

339

The temps were high that day, cattle were barely moving, all of them under the trees until evening came around.

I spoke with our vet when I was picking up a bottle of GnRH and he told me that breeding in summer is very hard to do, the heats are tough to spot and the likelihood of it sticking was low. While I agree with him overall, we still have been able to successfully settle them and have a healthy calf on down the road. Hence the reason for going ahead with things.

Not sure if we got her, will know when we Biopryn test her in 28 days.

Would like to hear others input on breeding in hot summer months, successes, failures, general opinion. Thanks!
About how much does it cost to setup that moo monitor system? What all does the data show you besides heats?
The base station is about $6k, each collar is about $200, you will need a dedicated DSL broadband connection for each base station. You could get started on a small scale for under $10k, or the costs could go up substantially as you increase collars and base stations. Depends on how big you want the system to be.

As for what else you can see besides heats, you see rumination, resting, feeding, and activity intensity in addition to behavior alerts and heat alerts. This can be invaluable because it allows you to quickly check your herd daily in a way that a visual check could never compare to. If you see rumination plummet, you had better be out looking at that cow ASAP to find out what’s wrong.
Is there anything that you notice is different data wise between your most fertile cows and an average cow in the herd?

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Brookhill Angus » Sat Jun 29, 2019 4:59 pm

Dsteim wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 2:59 pm
Brookhill Angus wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 3:12 am
Dsteim wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 4:48 pm


About how much does it cost to setup that moo monitor system? What all does the data show you besides heats?
The base station is about $6k, each collar is about $200, you will need a dedicated DSL broadband connection for each base station. You could get started on a small scale for under $10k, or the costs could go up substantially as you increase collars and base stations. Depends on how big you want the system to be.

As for what else you can see besides heats, you see rumination, resting, feeding, and activity intensity in addition to behavior alerts and heat alerts. This can be invaluable because it allows you to quickly check your herd daily in a way that a visual check could never compare to. If you see rumination plummet, you had better be out looking at that cow ASAP to find out what’s wrong.
Is there anything that you notice is different data wise between your most fertile cows and an average cow in the herd?
Yes, the strongest and most fertile females show up stronger on the heats than the older gals who are slowing down as age takes hold. There are a few in the herd that would have a strong heat if it were over 100, and they settle on the first try. Those are the females that we are going to flush in the future and try to get daughters from. The heat issue in the cattle business is just starting in my opinion and is going to get worse. I talked extensively to two different vets on this issue and they told me that fertility issues are popping up constantly in conversation as of late with their clients.
"When someone tells you it can't be done, it's more a reflection of their limitations, not yours"

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Dsteim » Sat Jun 29, 2019 6:02 pm

Is there a correlation with the most fertile ones cycling back the fastest post calving? Talking in number of days not necessarily the first one to calve being the first to cycle.

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Re: AI breeding in hot summer conditions

Post by Brookhill Angus » Sat Jun 29, 2019 6:11 pm

Dsteim wrote:
Sat Jun 29, 2019 6:02 pm
Is there a correlation with the most fertile ones cycling back the fastest post calving? Talking in number of days not necessarily the first one to calve being the first to cycle.
Absolutely, in my case that is, there are certain mommas that will cycle back very quickly. However with that said, I don't like to start breeding them back until about 75-100 days. My vet explained a lot to me about how the reproductive system in a cow needs time to repair, and that was all I needed to hear in order to not rush the process. It also allows me to get a very good idea of when her cycles are and then I can plan for AI.
"When someone tells you it can't be done, it's more a reflection of their limitations, not yours"

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