Fencing and methods used

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greggy
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Fencing and methods used

Post by greggy » Sun May 26, 2019 11:29 am

Hi All,

We prob do things a bit different here, or use different terms rather, but I guess fencing methods or requirements change everywhere.

I have standard height perimeter fencing, with net mesh on the bottom, is diamond shape, then on top 1 plain wire and a top barb, this keeps most things out and in.

I am about to do some internal fencing, and while it is not likely to face much pressure, I would like to know peoples thoughts.

On my external fencing and some internal, contractors have run the single wires through holes in the t posts, so far, so good, until you need to replace a post :)

Anyway, for my internal, I am going to use hinge joint, and unlike my other posts that are concrete, I will be using steel, and T posts between strainers at about 15ft intervals. Now, my questions are...

1 How do you face the T posts, so the netting meets with the flat section of the T or the pointy section, if that makes sense.
2 Do you run single line HT wire at top and bottom of net, or, do you just use the existing strands fixed to posts to hang the nettiing. On internal this is prob too much.
3 I have undulating land, I have a run that goes on a right angle, so 3 strainer posts, from the middle one is approx 100ft run each way, but one side of the middle post is pretty flat, the other is going up hill, I was told I can do this as one run, but thinking about it, this would probably only work if land was flat each way ? It also mean on the part going up (or down) hill, the net will not be lining up with the post that is level, but everyone say make sure the net lines up with the post....err, ok, I think they assume your land is flat ?

PS our T posts do not have the lugs I have seen that some of you use, so you must tie on with wire.



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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by callmefence » Sun May 26, 2019 1:47 pm

1...pointy section
2...yes but use barbwire.
3. Yes one stretch. No the stays on net Will not line up with plum post on unlevel ground. Nor should it.

Why hinge joint.? It's not that much cheaper and far inferior to a solid stay net.
If it ain't tight , It ain't right.




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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by wbvs58 » Sun May 26, 2019 7:02 pm

Yes the correct side to tie off to is the pointy side but the fence I am currently doing I have put the wire on the flat side intentionally as my neighbour will be running a hot wire close to the ground to stop dogs digging under and it makes it easier to just attach the insulators on the pointy side and will give a bit of space to the wires as long as all remains tight.

Ken

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by greggy » Tue May 28, 2019 2:15 pm

callmefence wrote:
Sun May 26, 2019 1:47 pm
1...pointy section
2...yes but use barbwire.
3. Yes one stretch. No the stays on net Will not line up with plum post on unlevel ground. Nor should it.

Why hinge joint.? It's not that much cheaper and far inferior to a solid stay net.
mmm...was just about to drive them so would rest on flat side.....

on 2, no I mean, a HT wire at bottom and top, you could tie the net to that wire then, just as they do with netting, and if that wire and others are not run through t post holes, you could replace or add posts anytime without cutting or unrolling.winding wire.....was my thinking anyway.

with 3, so if the forward 100 is straight in front of you and the angle goes to the right uphill, there will be enough stretch to get the net to sit tight against that middle pole which is the corner ? I guess I will find out, I can try it :)

Why hinge joint, well it is very common here, and I have a roll of it already, we work in cm, it is 8 rows or 90cm (3ft something) and 30cm (1 ft) vertical spacing, it is internal, I will add some plain wires on top maybe, will have electric on both sides, I find or have found knee height keeps my sheep and cows away from fences, at the minuet I have 4 strands of very thin electric poly, but some cunning sheep know how to exploit it & some sheep when hit accidentally by touching wire will panic and sometimes run the wrong way, sometimes snapping a wire, or dragging posts out that are only tread ins, it served its purpose for a year though, was put in temp to determine if this was a good fencline.

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by greggy » Tue May 28, 2019 2:18 pm

wbvs58 wrote:
Sun May 26, 2019 7:02 pm
Yes the correct side to tie off to is the pointy side but the fence I am currently doing I have put the wire on the flat side intentionally as my neighbour will be running a hot wire close to the ground to stop dogs digging under and it makes it easier to just attach the insulators on the pointy side and will give a bit of space to the wires as long as all remains tight.

Ken
The more I look, the more I think it is not as important, unless maybe you know fence will be under regular intense pressure ?

I just realized, that the fencing which is in great shape around much of my perimeter, done by contractors 40+ years ago, has posts facing both ways.

Only think I do not like is how you cannot replace any 1 post easily as all wires pass through the posts apart from top barb.

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by callmefence » Tue May 28, 2019 2:28 pm

Tpost don't have holes in them
If it ain't tight , It ain't right.




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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by wbvs58 » Tue May 28, 2019 8:43 pm

callmefence wrote:
Tue May 28, 2019 2:28 pm
Tpost don't have holes in them
Ours do Fence. They go under many names, T posts, Y posts, star pickets, Stock posts. We have insultors that slip over the "rib" and a nylon pin pins them to the post through the hole.

Ken

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by greggy » Wed May 29, 2019 4:24 am

Most of ours do, most people know them as star posts or pickets down here as they are more triangular.

Holes mean you can run wires (prob a bad idea but very common), also there are a range of things you can bolt onto the posts, such as offset insulators for running hot wire, or you can bolt on insulators direct as well.

https://www.thefencingstore.com.au/shop ... ckets.html

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=star ... 20&bih=965

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by callmefence » Wed May 29, 2019 6:34 am

greggy wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 4:24 am
Most of ours do, most people know them as star posts or pickets down here as they are more triangular.

Holes mean you can run wires (prob a bad idea but very common), also there are a range of things you can bolt onto the posts, such as offset insulators for running hot wire, or you can bolt on insulators direct as well.

https://www.thefencingstore.com.au/shop ... ckets.html

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=star ... 20&bih=965
Interesting..a similar post was popular here probably 50 years ago. Also called star post. The holes where used to run tie wire through.
They where made of very poor low quality steel.
If it ain't tight , It ain't right.




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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by greggy » Wed May 29, 2019 6:50 am

Yep, tie wire, or actual wire runs (not barb of course)

You can get these in all sorts of steel, cheap chinese garbage, Aust steel and even reclaiming old ones is worthwhile as the steel was very good quality, the ones on my perimeter would be hard to match today.

I also have some of the Chinese ones that wer gal plated, well, they are rusty....so cheap steel and poor gal plating...lol

The one I buy now are prob Chinese, but through a steel company, not from a cheap bulk warehouse, anyways, it will end up stronger than my poly wire strands and plastic posts, I will use electric offsets, I think my internals are prob most likely to be damaged by me or other humans using cars or machinery, if it was my perimeter, I would be looking closely at all materials.

Ironically perimeter gets pressure from roos, and it is diamond netting, I am surprised at how well it has done after 40 years with goats, and sheep, cattle do not come near the fence at all and are new to property AFAIK, but the hotwire keeps them off no prob & I do not plan on any wild cattle... It is pretty easy to patch too.

If I was to re do perimeter, I would put a strong pre fab on outside & prob diamond netting behind that, keep small stuff out and most larger stuff too, although roos can be persistant buggers if they are used to taking one particular path.

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by greggy » Wed May 29, 2019 7:03 am

callmefence wrote:
Sun May 26, 2019 1:47 pm
1...pointy section
Can I ask why pointy section ?

I was thinking the flatter side may offer more strength, so should maybe face the highest likely pressure ?

I suppose, there is no real reason not to bring spacing closer and alternate them.

I was thinking of 5m (15-16ft) spacing between, but this may be too close seeing I have 2 steel strainers at ends and about 50m run and will still have electric to keep animals off.

Like to know everyones thoughts, I have seen people get away with very long spans with pre fab, it would be a prob for 5 horizontal wires, but prefab ?

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by callmefence » Wed May 29, 2019 7:07 am

greggy wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 7:03 am
callmefence wrote:
Sun May 26, 2019 1:47 pm
1...pointy section
Can I ask why pointy section ?

I was thinking the flatter side may offer more strength, so should maybe face the highest likely pressure ?

I suppose, there is no real reason not to bring spacing closer and alternate them.

I was thinking of 5m (15-16ft) spacing between, but this may be too close seeing I have 2 steel strainers at ends and about 50m run and will still have electric to keep animals off.

Like to know everyones thoughts, I have seen people get away with very long spans with pre fab, it would be a prob for 5 horizontal wires, but prefab ?
I was referring to the pointy section of a American tpost. I'll try to post a picture and it will be obvious we're talking about different things. I concur on the STAR post ,can't see it making much difference.
If it ain't tight , It ain't right.




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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by greggy » Wed May 29, 2019 7:14 am

Yeah, ok.

I can only think logically that the flatter side may be stronger, but maybe not as that means the side with holes will take more force....

may be over thinking it all too seeing animals are pretty mild and electric trained :)

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by greggy » Sat Jun 01, 2019 7:21 am

So, I think your posts have those nubs for hanging the fence from, or too hold clips ?

I put my posts in, but used different size posts, and brands, anyway, my pre fab is 90cm high, which is 3ft something, I leveled out a lot of the runs, and I sized things so posts will hold fence an inch approx off the ground. Will put 2 wires on top, prob a plan and a top hot wire, as is internal, no point using barb, if anything is under that much pressure, would rather a shock than ripped skin :)

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Re: Fencing and methods used

Post by callmefence » Sat Jun 01, 2019 7:26 am

greggy wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 7:21 am
So, I think your posts have those nubs for hanging the fence from, or too hold clips ?

I put my posts in, but used different size posts, and brands, anyway, my pre fab is 90cm high, which is 3ft something, I leveled out a lot of the runs, and I sized things so posts will hold fence an inch approx off the ground. Will put 2 wires on top, prob a plan and a top hot wire, as is internal, no point using barb, if anything is under that much pressure, would rather a shock than ripped skin :)
Yes the nobs are what I was referring to the pointy section lol....
We call the nubs tits.
If it ain't tight , It ain't right.




You can all go to he// . I'll go to Texas.
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