Fall Lime to Prep for Frost Seeding Clover

Discuss grasses and how to grow and harvest them.
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Stocker Steve
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Fall Lime to Prep for Frost Seeding Clover

Post by Stocker Steve » Tue Aug 02, 2005 2:41 am

My soil tested 6.2 ph. This is in the recommended range for clover, but a 6.5 ph is said to be better.

Any experience with seeding success or clover stand longivity with minimum recommended vs. ideal ph?

I am trying to decide if I should buy P&K or lime plus P&K. :?:


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Post by Conagher » Wed Aug 03, 2005 7:53 am

SS, my ag ext agent is fond of saying, "If you can afford to only do one, lime or fert, always choose to lime." You may want to check with your local agent and see what they would recommend.

Good Luck!

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Post by dun » Wed Aug 03, 2005 9:52 am

Has it ever been limed/ If so, how long ago? I have a couple of fields that were limed 4-5 years ago and the ph has increased every year since.

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Applications

Post by Stocker Steve » Thu Aug 04, 2005 1:39 am

The land has never been limed but it has been fertilized. N2 will lower your PH.
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Re: Applications

Post by dun » Thu Aug 04, 2005 2:26 am

Stocker Steve wrote:The land has never been limed but it has been fertilized. N2 will lower your PH.


Any of the chemical based fertilizer components will lower the ph. If you boost the ph you'll be surprised at how soime of the other things will change for the better.
I have an advantage of multiple years of soil tests so it's easier to see the changes.

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Ph but no D

Post by Stocker Steve » Thu Aug 04, 2005 2:32 am

What ph do you shoot for in clover and grass seeded pastures?
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Post by dun » Thu Aug 04, 2005 2:48 am

I worry more about the ph that the grass requires and just let the clover tag along but anything over 6 works ok for us. The recommended range for most of the forages run 5.6 -7.0 and red clover is 6.0-7.0, that's why we don;t worry about getting it much over 6. When the ph drops or the first year that it doesn;t show an improvment is when we lime. We had one pasture that had been neglected and it called for 3000 lbs per acre. We put on 1500 ansd when we retested 2 years later it didn;t call for any. That's why we take it easy, raising the ph frees up other soil components that affect the release of the lime neutralizing agents, which-- etc.
We curretnly only have 1 field that's below 6, but there's no way to get the lime truck or the buggy in there so we just graze it and brush hog it when we pull the cows off. It grows very good fescue and clover but orchard grass doesn;t do a thing.
Even within fields there will be a variation because of the soil type so we take multiple samples from the different parts of the field based on what is growing and how well it's growing. Since it's hard to get the exactly right amounts on any given odd section, we take the average of the entire field and apply enough of whatever, based on the worst part to bring the worst part up to the average of the entire field. Not sure if I explained that very well.

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