Finally.....

Discuss grasses and how to grow and harvest them.
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Aaron
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Re: Finally.....

Post by Aaron » Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:15 am

Logar wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 4:53 am
Aaron wrote:
Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:20 pm
We need a month of dry weather here. About 15" of rain in the last month. High knolls are squishy when you step on them. Low land is floating. Thousands of acres of crops haven't been touched. I still have 70 acres of first cut, most have given up all together. Lots of people short of hay because they haven't been able to get it cut. Lots of hay wasted with flooding in fields saturating bales. It's a mess. This is why I hope for drought every single year. A wet year can ruin you much faster than a dry one.
We had the same issues some time back but tiled all the workable land - solved all our issues. Expensive but it works. Would it work in your area?

Cheers
Lots of acres tiled for crops here and those guys are barely getting by. Rain every day or every 2nd day for last 5 weeks has the tile lines fully submerged. I seen a tiled soybean field with over a foot of water in it. How waterproof are bean pods? Lots of feed grain junk that has to be run through dryers just to save it from turning to black mush. Definitely going to test the limits of crop insurance this year.


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Re: Finally.....

Post by Stocker Steve » Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:45 am

I question whether tile pays with the current grain prices. I plant reed canary.

Bean sprouts are valuable but tough to transport. Sounds like you are holding ducks?

Good grain crops locally, but I think the combines will not roll much until after freeze up.
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Re: Finally.....

Post by gcreekrch » Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:05 am

Stocker Steve wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:01 am
gcreekrch wrote:
Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:35 pm
I bought 500 tons of cow hay two weeks ago. It will land here for $185 per ton. Heavy bales make a big difference in ton price when hauling very far. Another 150 tons of second cut alfalfa to bump the protein on our poorest hay. Lick tubs will do the rest.

Some neighbors paying up to $240 for hay from brokers. Never liked making those guys rich.
Why is hay so high priced in the north ?
It's called supply and demand. There is a hay compression plant at Vanderhoof that is exporting to China.
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Re: Finally.....

Post by Nesikep » Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:47 am

Last spring I sold my hay to the brokers for $250

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Re: Finally.....

Post by Stocker Steve » Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:44 am

So the profitable 2019 move is to sell both cows and hay ?
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Re: Finally.....

Post by gcreekrch » Tue Oct 01, 2019 10:19 am

These old cows have been pulling us along for 40 years. I guess they will carry us further along the trail yet.
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Re: Finally.....

Post by ChrisB » Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:03 pm

Stocker Steve wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:45 am
I question whether tile pays with the current grain prices. I plant reed canary.

Bean sprouts are valuable but tough to transport. Sounds like you are holding ducks?

Good grain crops locally, but I think the combines will not roll much until after freeze up.
Steve, How and when do you plant the reed canary? Is it just on lower ground? Have you had issues of it getting overly mature before being able to bale? Able to get 2 cuttings? With all the mud the past few years, I've been thinking of planting one lower ground field into canary for feeding my fall calving cows before they can go out on corn stalks. Will it come back after getting mudded up a bit from feeding in the fall? Thanks

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Re: Finally.....

Post by Stocker Steve » Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:24 pm

Seed box on an old grain drill, with a lb of timothy or three lbs meadow fescue and some legume. Ladino persists the longest on low ground, BFT is second choice, Kura is unavailable.
Usually spring, but really wet spots many not work until August.
High or low ground, but it competes better on low ground.
Yes.
High yes, low sometimes. It does not like frequent cutting.
Yes, AFTER it establishes. Clip only the first year.

Reed canary usually beats tall fescue in the north. The big negative is that cows will not eat it if you try to stockpile. A nice long term low ground mix is MF, RC, WC, BFT. The RC establishes very slowly but it will take over as the others thin out.

I have grown RC with branch root alfalfa on high meadow. It makes better dry hay than the traditional clover mixes.
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Re: Finally.....

Post by gcreekrch » Tue Oct 01, 2019 9:24 pm

238, 50" bale plugging lumps later, baled yesterday and finished wrapping today. One 3 acre patch had 49 bales on it. The field that normally does the best was the poorest this year. Still a bumper crop by 90 bales. Now to send some off for a nitrate test.

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