Baling Green Hay

Discuss grasses and how to grow and harvest them.
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CCCowman
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Baling Green Hay

Post by CCCowman » Fri May 17, 2019 6:21 am

Had a guy tell me tonight about baling green hay (like the Amish do) and wrapping it with plastic. He said if you cut it and then turn right around and bale/wrap it, it would be high protein and high sugar. Cows would eat it like grain. I'm sure you need good quality grass though.

Anybody do this or tried it??


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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by pricefarm » Fri May 17, 2019 6:36 am

A lot of people around me does it. They usually cut one day then bale the next day depending on weather. It does have to dry down some. It basically make silage out of. Makes good feed when you open the bale up it's almost like feeding them fresh green grass. You do have to have a roller designed to bale the wet hay and a bale wrapper to wrap it in plastic

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by sstterry » Fri May 17, 2019 7:22 am

CCCowman wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 6:21 am
Had a guy tell me tonight about baling green hay (like the Amish do) and wrapping it with plastic. He said if you cut it and then turn right around and bale/wrap it, it would be high protein and high sugar. Cows would eat it like grain. I'm sure you need good quality grass though.

Anybody do this or tried it??
It is referred to as Haylage or round bale silage in some places. I know that there is quite a bit of it done in other areas. Have a friend in GA that swears by it and says the cows eat it like candy.
https://duplin.ces.ncsu.edu/2018/04/haylage/

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by sstterry » Fri May 17, 2019 4:47 pm

One thing to bear in mind if you are using this type of silage, the bales are about 2 to 3 times heavier than a normal bale and you definitely can't use a spear to store it. It has to remain airtight or it will spoil.

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by chevytaHOE5674 » Fri May 17, 2019 6:20 pm

Do around a thousand for myself and customers every year. The only reason the feed is "better quality" than dry hay is because you can make it when the hay is at its prime not when mother nature allows. It is a lot more work as the bales are heavy, need to be hauled and wrapped asap, have to keep the plastic sealed, etc.

If mother nature allows I will take dry hay everytime.

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by gcreekrch » Fri May 17, 2019 9:30 pm

chevytaHOE5674 wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 6:20 pm
Do around a thousand for myself and customers every year. The only reason the feed is "better quality" than dry hay is because you can make it when the hay is at its prime not when mother nature allows. It is a lot more work as the bales are heavy, need to be hauled and wrapped asap, have to keep the plastic sealed, etc.

If mother nature allows I will take dry hay everytime.
I concur, plastic is cheaper than feeding black hay but it does cost extra for smaller bales. We moved from an individual wrapper to an in-line a few years ago. Speeded things up a bunch.
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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by 5S Cattle » Fri May 17, 2019 10:01 pm

Our local tractor house had a brand new bale wrapper sitting outside the other day. I was curious because they are not popular in our area. Asked how much it was, dang near 40k! Couldn’t believe it was that much.

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by sstterry » Sat May 18, 2019 5:33 am

gcreekrch wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 9:30 pm
I concur, plastic is cheaper than feeding black hay but it does cost extra for smaller bales. We moved from an individual wrapper to an in-line a few years ago. Speeded things up a bunch.
Pardon my ignorance, but with an-inline wrapper, how do you keep the hay airtight after you have opened the plastic on the first bale. It seems like an awful lot of wasted plastic over the course of a winter.

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by chevytaHOE5674 » Sat May 18, 2019 8:43 am

Once you start feeding out of a line of bales you have to use them quick enough so that the exposed end bale doesnt have a chance to get moldy.

For a small time guy only feeding occasionally or for somebody wanting the ability to sell bales, individually wrapped is good. For somebody who wants to wrap as much hay as cheap and fast as possible inline is the way to go.

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by T & B farms » Sat May 18, 2019 11:29 am

We bale close to 1000 silage bales a year. Like has been said, baling them wet and wrapping them does not add feed value to them. For us it allows us to get hay put up at the right time for quality. Another positive is there is no waste with balage that is put up right. No flat spot on the bottom of rotten hay.

All our dry hay is baled 5’x68” and they will weigh 16-1800 lbs.
On silage hay, I bale them 5’x 50-55” and at 65% moisture they will usually weigh 2000-2200.

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by gcreekrch » Sat May 18, 2019 3:15 pm

sstterry wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 5:33 am
gcreekrch wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 9:30 pm
I concur, plastic is cheaper than feeding black hay but it does cost extra for smaller bales. We moved from an individual wrapper to an in-line a few years ago. Speeded things up a bunch.
Pardon my ignorance, but with an-inline wrapper, how do you keep the hay airtight after you have opened the plastic on the first bale. It seems like an awful lot of wasted plastic over the course of a winter.
The end bales have some spoilage from wrapping to when fed but when you are feeding 15 to 20 of them per day spoilage is not an issue once the stack is opened.
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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by True Grit Farms » Sat May 18, 2019 6:21 pm

T & B farms wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 11:29 am
We bale close to 1000 silage bales a year. Like has been said, baling them wet and wrapping them does not add feed value to them. For us it allows us to get hay put up at the right time for quality. Another positive is there is no waste with balage that is put up right. No flat spot on the bottom of rotten hay.

All our dry hay is baled 5’x68” and they will weigh 16-1800 lbs.
On silage hay, I bale them 5’x 50-55” and at 65% moisture they will usually weigh 2000-2200.
So you need to feed 4 rolls of the silage hay to get the same amount of dry matter as one 5x68?
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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by Hogtiming » Sat May 18, 2019 6:47 pm

It is popular in our area. But I have wondered at the end of the winter so you feed more or less haylage versus dry hay?

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by T & B farms » Sat May 18, 2019 10:33 pm

True Grit Farms wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 6:21 pm
T & B farms wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 11:29 am
We bale close to 1000 silage bales a year. Like has been said, baling them wet and wrapping them does not add feed value to them. For us it allows us to get hay put up at the right time for quality. Another positive is there is no waste with balage that is put up right. No flat spot on the bottom of rotten hay.

All our dry hay is baled 5’x68” and they will weigh 16-1800 lbs.
On silage hay, I bale them 5’x 50-55” and at 65% moisture they will usually weigh 2000-2200.
So you need to feed 4 rolls of the silage hay to get the same amount of dry matter as one 5x68?
I would say that is pretty close. I actually like that better. Most all my hay is fed by unrolling. Lots of small herds, 20-30 cows. I will unrole 1 bale of that and they will pick it clean. Then they will go off and pick for the rest of the day. I do things differently if weather is real nasty, or if the pasture is picked real short.

Edited to add;
After thinking about that some more, 4 to 1 doesn’t seem right. That’s what the math says, but watching the consumption it seems it’s more like 2 to 1. At the places I feed in rings seems a good dry bale lasts about twice as long

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Re: Baling Green Hay

Post by gcreekrch » Sat May 18, 2019 10:51 pm

T & B farms wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 10:33 pm
True Grit Farms wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 6:21 pm
T & B farms wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 11:29 am
We bale close to 1000 silage bales a year. Like has been said, baling them wet and wrapping them does not add feed value to them. For us it allows us to get hay put up at the right time for quality. Another positive is there is no waste with balage that is put up right. No flat spot on the bottom of rotten hay.

All our dry hay is baled 5’x68” and they will weigh 16-1800 lbs.
On silage hay, I bale them 5’x 50-55” and at 65% moisture they will usually weigh 2000-2200.
So you need to feed 4 rolls of the silage hay to get the same amount of dry matter as one 5x68?
I would say that is pretty close. I actually like that better. Most all my hay is fed by unrolling. Lots of small herds, 20-30 cows. I will unrole 1 bale of that and they will pick it clean. Then they will go off and pick for the rest of the day. I do things differently if weather is real nasty, or if the pasture is picked real short.

Edited to add;
After thinking about that some more, 4 to 1 doesn’t seem right. That’s what the math says, but watching the consumption it seems it’s more like 2 to 1. At the places I feed in rings seems a good dry bale lasts about twice as long
We try to dry ours down to between 20 and 30%. Feed pretty much 1 to 1.

There are haying season where that choice is not ours to make.
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