Hairy Vetch

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Hairy Vetch

Post by Banjo » Wed May 01, 2019 12:58 pm

I see a lot of recommendations for hairy vetch in a pasture mix along with other stuff such as annual ryegrass, rye etc.
But according to some articles I've read....it says it is toxic to cattle and horses.
So, now i'm confused... is it toxic or not. i have a little bit voluntered in my pastures and I haven't had any issues with it.

what say you all....



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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by kentuckyguy » Wed May 01, 2019 1:50 pm

I’d like to hear about this also. We have lots of it this year and I was thinking I might plant some for it’s ability to build nitrogen.

Once I read about it not being palatable and poisonous to cattle I gave up on the idea. I would rather just plant clover if that’s the case.

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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by HDRider » Wed May 01, 2019 1:51 pm

I am sure you found this.

Though commonly found in pastures, hairy vetch can cause a systemic granulomatous disease, occasionally in cattle and rarely in horses. The disease prevalence is greatest when the major component of the forage is hairy vetch or when the plant is reaching maturity in mid to late spring. The plant is less likely to cause a problem in hay or when ensiled.

In cattle, the ingestion of Vicia spp. has been associated with three apparently different clinical manifestations. One clinical form is characterized by acute neurological signs compatible with the cyanogenic glycosides contained in the seeds. In another form, the animals may present with subcutaneous swelling, ulcers of the oral mucous membranes, purulent nasal discharge, cough, alopecia, weakness, and loss of appetite. The third form of V. villosa (and, to a lesser extent, other Vicia species) poisoning, which is the best studied and documented of the three forms, consists of pruritic dermatitis with alopecia (not restricted to non-pigmented areas as seen with photo-sensitivity), diarrhea, weight loss, drop in milk yield, and sporadic abortions and red-tinged urine. The body temperature is usually normal. Lymphocytosis and hyperproteinemia are typical clinical pathologic alterations in affected animals. In horses, reported clinical signs include generalized dermatitis, with alopecia, crusting and scaling, blepharitis, conjunctivitis, corneal ulceration, lymphadenomegaly, depen-dent edema, diarrhea, and wasting, accompanied by lymphocytosis and hyperproteinemia.

On postmortem examination of affected animals, there are multifocal to coalescing, gray-yellow, soft to moderately firm nodules disrupting the normal architecture of several organs, including liver, kidneys, spleen, heart, lymph nodes, and adrenal gland. Microscopically, the lesions consist of perivascular granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate composed of epitheloid macrophages, lymphocytes, plasma cells, occasional multinucleated giant cells, and, often, eosinophils.

The pathogenic mechanism associated with hairy vetch toxicosis has not yet been determined. It has been proposed that the vetch lectins induce a type IV, or cell mediated, hypersensitivity reaction that would account for the inflammatory reaction seen in this condition. Another hypothesis is that the vetch lectins might directly activate T lymphocytes, thereby initiating the multisystemic granulomatous disease. The facts that the plant is frequently consumed by cattle without any apparent problem, that several unsuccessful attempts have been made to experimentally induce the disease in younger animals, and that it was reproduced only once in a cow that had recovered from the disease one year earlier are claimed as further evidence to the hypersensitivity theory. A genetic predisposition is also suggested because vetch-associated systemic granulomatous disease occurs mainly in Holstein and Angus cattle.

In cattle, vetch-associated disease is prevalent and more severe in cattle > 3 years old. Affected younger animals usually have mild disease, but can still be fatally affected. Sex predilection is not apparent. Outbreaks are most common during the season of maximal vetch growth, although sporadic cases are observed throughout the year. Cattle that develop the clinical disease usually have been grazing pasture that contained hairy vetch for at least 2 to 6 weeks, and sometimes clinical signs can become apparent only after the cattle have been removed from the hairy vetch pastures. The interval between the appearance of clinical signs and death ranges from 3 days to 5 weeks, but is usually between 10 and 20 days. Morbidity rates vary from 1-68% (but in most outbreaks is approximately 10%); lethality rates are usually high (50-100%; therefore, recovery of animals that develop severe disease is unlikely.

In horses, systemic granulomatous disease is most likely multifactorial. Many cases of this disease occur in this species without known exposure to vetch pasture. Also in cattle, several clinically and pathologically similar (if not identical) diseases have been reported in animals that have not had access to vetch. These have been referred to as "vetch-like diseases", and have been associated with the consumption of rations containing diureido-isobutance (DUIB) in the Netherlands, the ingestion of silage preserved with Sylade (a commercial silage additive consisting of a combination of formalin and sulphuric acid) in Wales, and the consumption of citrus pulp in the United States, England, and Brazil.

-by Bethany Lovaas, Class of 2004

-edited by Dr. Ingeborg Langohr, ADDL Graduate student

https://www.addl.purdue.edu/newsletters ... /vetch.asp
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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by Nesikep » Wed May 01, 2019 3:19 pm

I've had hairy vetch as hay and didn't have a problem, but they also say it's not as much of a problem when hayed/ensiled

It can be a #$%#$ to hay though, heck to walk through
Image

It is EXCELLENT for building nitrogen though, it's fast growing and if you till the whole works under is an awesome green manure crop that will make the next hay crop grow really nicely.. I could clearly see the line in the field from where I'd had the vetch the previous year vs where I just plowed the old alfalfa down
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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by snoopdog » Wed May 01, 2019 7:37 pm

It is excellent for building nitrogen, and I would think you would have to have other things going on for it to be a PREDOMINANT crop, and then only an occasional sickness. I'll keep my vetch, and encourage it. When I was a kid and traipsing all over hill and dale, came up on a cabin and found a bunch of gov't pamphlets, and one of the first ones was about legumes, these were post dust bowl, and I wish I still had them.
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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by Banjo » Wed May 01, 2019 10:22 pm

Nesikep wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 3:19 pm
I've had hairy vetch as hay and didn't have a problem, but they also say it's not as much of a problem when hayed/ensiled

It can be a #$%#$ to hay though, heck to walk through
Image

It is EXCELLENT for building nitrogen though, it's fast growing and if you till the whole works under is an awesome green manure crop that will make the next hay crop grow really nicely.. I could clearly see the line in the field from where I'd had the vetch the previous year vs where I just plowed the old alfalfa down
Are you familiar with cicer milkvetch? I read an article that promoted it pretty highly.

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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by Nesikep » Thu May 02, 2019 1:36 am

I can find articles that'll promote putting urine in your eye...

All kidding aside, no, I've never used that, I used winter vetch and spring vetch.

One of the downsides of vetch is it's a big seed, works well in a broadcast seeder if you're putting oats/barley/rye in as well. It's also pretty expensive

I'm looking to try more crimson clover for an annual legume, I was just a little late planting it last year and coupled with a cold, dark fall it really didn't get a chance to bloom, I seeded it with barley, rye, and ryegrass and it made amazing fall forage

Munch munch!
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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by Banjo » Thu May 02, 2019 6:03 am

Nesikep wrote:
Thu May 02, 2019 1:36 am
I can find articles that'll promote putting urine in your eye...

All kidding aside, no, I've never used that, I used winter vetch and spring vetch.

One of the downsides of vetch is it's a big seed, works well in a broadcast seeder if you're putting oats/barley/rye in as well. It's also pretty expensive

I'm looking to try more crimson clover for an annual legume, I was just a little late planting it last year and coupled with a cold, dark fall it really didn't get a chance to bloom, I seeded it with barley, rye, and ryegrass and it made amazing fall forage

Munch munch!
Image
https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_asci4.pdf

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/let-cat ... eding/#top

What i have found about it.

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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by pdfangus » Thu May 02, 2019 1:58 pm

THERE ARE NAYSAYER OUT THERE THAT WILL SWEAR THAT ICE CREAM IS BAD FOR YOU...

AS AN OLDER FELLOW i USED TO KNOW SAID.....

"IF ITS GOOD TO YOU THEN IT IS GOOD FOR YOU."
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useful application for good.
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Re: Hairy Vetch

Post by jdg » Sun May 12, 2019 6:41 pm

Lost a bull to Hairy Vetch toxicity 3 year ago. I still plant it in mixes every year. It's the most productive winter legume I've ever encountered, and re-seeds aggressively. The bull I lost was in group of 30 bulls, he was the oldest, and was grazing it in mostly a monoculture for about 3 weeks. He was the only one affected.

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